22

Prohibition did not come about because people were seeking to ban anything and decided to select alcohol. Rather, prohibition was the culmination of a temperance movement that had developed in the US for decades. People had been seeking to ban alcohol for well over a century because its use was widespread and so were its effects. No other substance came ...


19

Alcohol was banned by Congress through Amendment 18 in 1917 because of Protestant protest groups and grassroot campaigns from several Woman's Rights Movement organizations. The Wikipedia article sums everything up fairly well. LSD was discovered by a man named Albert Hofmann in 1938, so it came afterwards. Extasy was invented in 1914 in Germany, so America ...


16

Our cousin site, History.SE had an answer by @Athanasius covering this in-depth. I won't copy/paste the whole answer, but the executive summary is that Constitutional amendment had the following 3 benefits: It avoided the questions of constitutionality of regulating intrastate commerce (as-is, federal law would have had constitutional difficulties with ...


13

In the early 1900s, many American Protestants strongly supported Prohibition, but in order to outlaw alcohol (or anything), the only option Congress had was to wait for the States to amend the Constitution. Congress obtained the power to lay and collect taxes on anything (including labor) in 1913 with the newly established 16th Amendment, and immediately ...


8

Perhaps because (at least in the US) marijuana has a much greater number of users than other drugs, and a still larger base of people who regard it as basically harmless even if they don't care to use it themselves. That has led to increased popular support, which over time has become strong enough in some states to get legalization initiatives on the ...


5

Cocaine and heroin became illegal in 1915. LSD and XTC did not exist, at least not as something used recreationally. The main reason that they chose alcohol over other drugs was how widespread its use was. Virtually everyone knew of at least one drunk. The number of dope fiends was far smaller and after all, those drugs were often already illegal. ...


3

First you must understand why it was made illegal in the first place. Previous questions along related topics can help. This and this both speak to some of the political reasoning behind making it illegal in the first place. Further support show potentially racist motivations. Further reading here can help. This establishes that cannabis was made illegal ...


2

So there are two parts to the answer. First, why ban anything? At the time, women were just starting to see the possibilities of voting. At the time men created the laws, they approve them, they enforced them. Women had no part in it except to have to follow those laws. Now women were just starting to "get the vote". This was very important, as it meant ...


2

To build on a summary in Phoog's answer: Alcohol was considered the root cause of spousal abuse (the driving reason behing Women's temperance league). Almost everyone drank alcohol, for historical and hygienic reasons, making impact of alcohol immeasurably higher. Saloons led to political corruption.


2

The demographics of the United States are changing, and the Boomers are now our elderly. The elderly, not coincidentally, are the age bracket that is most likely to vote in elections. But first, some backstory. We have known for decades if not hundreds of years that cannabis sativa/indica was useful (hemp) and unlikely to cause crime (consumed), but the ...


1

Advisors advise, minsters decide. In Australia the goverment employs an advisory council "Australian National Advisory Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs" to provide it with advice on drug classification. The membership of the council consists mostly of experts in pharmocology, psychology and sociology, but is chaired by a politician (Kay Hull from the ...


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