21

From a legal perspective: Israel hasn't signed the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. Iran did sign the treaty and got the benefits from it - so Iran trying to get a nuclear weapon or not cooperating with the International Atomic Energy Agency to prove otherwise is a breach of the treaty. From a political / practical point of view: ...


20

As Geobits said, It's generally accepted that Pakistan has had nuclear weapons for over 20 years. The problem with Iran is that their statements to the effect of "We're going to destroy Israel" are well-documented. Pakistan, on the other hand, isn't friendly but isn't overtly hostile. Moreover, their record on this is pretty good- when have you heard of ...


8

You are incorrect to say, that there are double standards. You see, the is only one standard, INTEREST. Outcries, outrages, condemning, and expressing worry, are more or less, tools to secure and promote interests. They are not standards in themselves. Iran, is percieved hostile and defiant to the West. So, they would not want Iran to get a nuclear ...


8

Various international treaties often forbid countries from selling ready-made nuclear weapons to other countries. For example, the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty reads: Each nuclear-weapon State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to transfer to any recipient whatsoever nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or control over such ...


6

What are the implications of the poisoning of Alexey Navalny with respect to the proliferation and use of banned chemical weapons? Implications emboldened below. Why Putin deliberately uses Novichok to poison his enemies, even though it often fails to kill them Russian President Vladimir Putin continues to use the infamous Novichok nerve agent to poison ...


5

There are several reasons: Need for constant service and replacement. Nuclear weapons decay. The warhead is actually a constantly-running nuclear reactor. Plutonium-239 decays to Uranium-235, increasing critical mass, therefore the warhead is losing its power. A typical modern warhead is guaranteed to be in service for 30 years. Even a standby warhead is ...


4

The issues involving Iran are quite exceptional, focusing primarily on these issues gives a rather misleading picture about the NPT. So, let's start with considering what the whole point of the NPT is. When nuclear technology was developed after WWII, it was clear that the vast majority of the countries in the World would not be able to develop this ...


4

Here's my answer, but it's really just a collection of thoughts for someone with more knowledge to build on: What action, if any, will the signatories take The brazen way with which these agents have been deployed demonstrates the impotence of the OPCW. It is possible that it will be restructured, or superseded. Direct interference is unlikely, not least ...


3

Another point to add: The knowledge how to build an atomic bomb is a very old and common one, and you can in fact retrieve it from the internet. In fact, the principle is very simple: A mass of uranium/plutonium greater than the critical mass will detonate on its own. Just split it into two halves lower than the critical mass and push them together, for ...


3

Yes, Iran previously threatened withdrawal from the NNPT in 2018. See, for example, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/24/iran-threatens-to-withdraw-from-nuclear-weapons-treaty-npt


2

The design of nuclear bombs is well known by now. It's the enrichment facilities to separate the scarce (and fissionable) U-235 from the much more common U-238, and the reactor needed to make plutonium that are hard to do. With uranium bombs, just bring enough U-235 together, maybe add an extra shot of neutrons with an initiator, and it goes bang. The ...


2

Additionally to @oranges' answer, DPRK was specifically known for using its weapons know-how and products as a cash cow (notably, chemical weapons technology to Syria, and missile technology to Iran. Source: Arms Control Wonk). Leaving aside Eric S. Raymondesque philosophizing over how open source can still generate money via providing services, in ...


2

According to Wikipedia, China was rejected in 2004: In 2004 China applied to join the MTCR, but members did not offer China membership because of concerns about China's export control standards. Checking the cited sources shows the Arms Control Association saying: In the weeks preceding the MTCR meeting, the United States imposed proliferation ...


2

What makes you believe nobody is worried about Pakistan? The international reactions back in 1998 were similar to those to Iran today, including sanctions: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chagai-I#International The simple fact is that that was then and this is now. 20 years of reality don't leave others much choice but accept the fact.


2

Politics is not conducted on the basis of rational scientific methods, it's based largely on irrational preferences. The reality is that the Pakistani nuclear weapons pose a much greater threat to World security than any Iranian stockpiles of nuclear weapons would, let alone Iranian enrichment facilities under strict IAEA inspections. The reason why ...


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