83 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

Multiple, proportionally weighted, representatives per district. Gerrymandering is only an issue because a 50.001% majority for a precinct and an 80% majority are considered equivariant. We also ...
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  • 1,662
46 votes

Why doesn't the UK Labour Party push for proportional representation?

Because Labour gets more seats with regional representation. Even the famed Tony Blair landslide majorities were never actually a popular majority. In 2005, Labour won 55% of the seats with 35% of ...
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  • 2,244
39 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

Note: This answer was written when the question was on Worldbuilding SE, the site for building consistent fictional worlds. The German System (simplified): Germany uses a form of Mixed-member ...
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  • 81.9k
33 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

Mediaeval Iceland style: Throw out the geographical restrictions entirely. Anyone who gets the backing of a certain number of people becomes a representative entitled to speak and vote at the ...
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  • 685
26 votes

Why doesn't the UK Labour Party push for proportional representation?

There is a strategic reason, and a philosophical reason, but they are related: With something like the current range of views in the UK, it is very unlikely that Labour could ever win a majority under ...
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  • 92.7k
17 votes
Accepted

How do political parties maintain local representation within proportional representation system?

Germany has a complicated mixture of direct and proportional representation, but the problems apply there as well. For the party list part of the system, the parties can assure reasonable regional ...
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  • 81.9k
15 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

Drop the election, adopt demarchy Vote is not the only way to reach democracy. In fact, some argues that it prevent real democracy, and lead to oligarchy, because by selecting representetives, you ...
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  • 329
14 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

The most interesting approach to this I've heard of was during the Alternative Vote referendum in the UK, where "oh but local representatives" was a major opposition argument. The proposal ...
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  • 693
13 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

Drop the two party system you seem to assume, and first-past-the-gate principle. In much of Europe it is proportional representation. Gerrymandering is not usually an issue. For example, here we have ...
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  • 1,024
12 votes

Why doesn't the UK Labour Party push for proportional representation?

Something else to consider: People vote differently in different voting systems. Right now, a lot of people vote for either Labour or the Conservatives not because they actually want to vote for them, ...
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  • 458
12 votes

How do democracies other than the US handle changes to district maps?

Many countries (in Europe and elsewhere) use some sort of proportional representation with multiple seats per district. Districts are very stable, possibly as large as a US state or even just a single ...
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  • 29.7k
11 votes

In an MMP system, why don't parties game the system by splitting into two parties?

This has actually happened. Lesotho is one of the four or so countries to use the MMP system. In the 2007 general election, the ruling party voluntarily split in two, fielding only electorate ...
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  • 381
11 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

No system can perfectly solve this problem mathematically, fundamentally it is an issue of aggregation and discretisation. When you aggregate a voter pool, you necessarily lose information about the ...
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  • 210
9 votes

Does the introduction of proportional representation lead to extremists getting elected to parliament?

PR is often promoted as being more representative because it results in greater plurality, i.e. a greater variety of views and parties in government. The alternative you mention, First Past the Post, ...
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  • 17.1k
9 votes

Why doesn't the UK Labour Party push for proportional representation?

This may be a ridiculous suggestion, but it's possible that not all politicians are cynical. 😉 The question's premise is that Proportional Representation would be in the Labour Party's selfish ...
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  • 484
9 votes
Accepted

In open-list voting systems, how do political parties ensure their leaders (and key figures) get elected?

They cannot guarantee that their leader will be the first person elected in their party. However, there are a few things they can do to improve those odds (though it's hard to quantify the effect ...
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  • 27.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Who is counted for representation in the US Congress?

Everyone who resides in the 50 states of the United States is counted, including noncitizens. U.S. Armed Forces personnel and federal civilian employees stationed outside the United States are also ...
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  • 45.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Do any theories justify majoritarian election outcomes?

The IDEA book, has among the advantages of first past the post one that might answer your question (on majority-biased outcomes): [b.] It gives rise to single-party governments. The ‘seat bonuses’ ...
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  • 104k
8 votes

How could I build a political system immune to gerrymandering yet still giving local representation?

I actually built a system like this: Full description, including examples and notes. Is it any good? Don't know, but it's exactly what you asked for. The condensed version follows: Benefits: Immune ...
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7 votes

In an MMP system, why don't parties game the system by splitting into two parties?

Leaving aside the obvious illegitimacy and dishonesty in this course of action (which would cost some votes and more reputation) and the ability of courts in common law countries to mitigate patent ...
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  • 813
7 votes

In a PR/STV system, is there any point in voting for a candidate I don't like to fight against one I like even less?

Morally, I agree with the message of the other current answers that in the absence of more information on the intentions of your fellow voters, it is often worth honestly stating your full ordering of ...
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  • 20.3k
7 votes

How do democracies other than the US handle changes to district maps?

In the UK, while elected politicians do have the final decision, they make that decision in a context where a non-partisan Boundary Commission has already made public its recommendations as to whether ...
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7 votes

How can parliament members in party-list systems faithfully represent their voters?

If you have been elected on a party platform, the voters have chosen you based on that platform, and the traditions of your party. So if you have been elected on a platform that promises tax ...
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  • 92.7k
6 votes

Why did most European countries adopt the proportional voting system?

While it is the case today that most European countries have a form of proportional representation, that apparently was notthe case when they first introduced democracy/elections, as described in a ...
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  • 104k
6 votes

What are the reasons behind discriminating between votes inside the country and those from diaspora in regard of proportional representation?

I think most countries do not allow expatriates to vote at all. The idea is that you are not affected by most of what the government of your home country does, so you should have little or no say ...
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  • 258
6 votes

Does the introduction of proportional representation lead to extremists getting elected to parliament?

Look at places like Israel or Germany, compared to the US. From this limited sample: PR leads to some smaller fringe/extremist parties in parliament. PR keeps large center-right or center-left ...
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  • 81.9k
6 votes

In a PR/STV system, is there any point in voting for a candidate I don't like to fight against one I like even less?

Assuming you are talking about the Irish General Elections that are coming up (seeing your account states you are Irish) That works as follows: The 160 members of Dáil Éireann will be elected by ...
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  • 1,635
6 votes

In a PR/STV system, is there any point in voting for a candidate I don't like to fight against one I like even less?

If you intend to do your utmost to ensure that this candidate does not get elected, it would be wise to rank every other candidate higher than them. It is possible to think of an STV election as a ...
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