95

This is a peculiarity as a result of the federal nature of the USA and the exceptional position of Puerto Rico as a territory but not a state. Within the States and Territories of the USA, your voting rights depend on residence. If you leave the States and Territories your voting rights depend on former residence or inheritance. In general most citizens of ...


66

Each time a new state is admitted to the Union, a new star is added on the following 4th of July (Independence Day in the USA). This was last done on 4th July 1960, following the admission of Hawai'i in August 1959. Prior to that, the flag had 49 stars for just 1 year, as Alaska joined in January 1959. The update in the flag is required by the US code and ...


40

The US doesn't have a presidential election. Get that idea out of your head. Instead, all 51 states* have their own presidential elections on the same day. This selects a set number of electors for each state. Those electors get together weeks later, and they decide who is President. To be eligible to vote, you have to be a US citizen resident in one of ...


39

The main point of objection by the boycotters is that the referendum essentially does not accomplish anything. It is not legally binding and would not significantly advance the movement for statehood or independence; therefore, opponents feel that boycotting it emphasizes its ineffectiveness. Part of the rationale for the opposition parties is that Congress ...


30

It was used in 2016 as a symbol of protesting the US’s passing of PROMESA, a law making a board control parts of the island’s economy and having unpopular measures such as decreasing the minimum wage by three dollars. A group painted over a famous mural of the flag with black: After this, it became used all over to protest budget cuts and the weakening of ...


22

What does a black-and-white Puerto Rican flag signify? It's a resistance flag. Described in this Mother Jones article, How a Change of Color for the Puerto Rican Flag Became a Symbol of Resistance, July 4, 2019: Just past 2:00 a.m. on July 4, 2016, four women arrived in front of a rustic wooden door in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... But the women felt the ...


13

Puerto Rico would officially ask to become a state (customary but not explicitly constitutionally required). Congress could pass a law admitting it as a state. You can read more about that here, which was previously posted in a comment. It's unclear how this would have changed aid. In theory, states have more influence on the political process than do ...


12

There is no official language in the US and the fact that Puerto Rico's official language is Spanish will not have any bearing on its becoming the US state in the future. Whether to designate a certain language as an official language is not a federal issue, but a state issue. According to the Wikipedia article on Languages of the United States The United ...


10

The House and the senate can set their own rules. There is nothing in the Constitution about non-voting representatives in the House or the Senate. The Puerto Rican delegates are there at the invite of the House. The House is intended to represent the people/citizens of states of the USA. It is a small step to also wanting to represent citizens of the USA ...


10

The only two certainties in life are death and taxes. While Puerto Ricans do pay some federal taxes such as FICA (Social Security), for the most part, Puerto Ricans currently do not pay federal income taxes. Becoming a state would immediately subject all Puerto Ricans to the federal income tax. There would most likely be enhanced benefits to Puerto Rico ...


6

"What is the legal reason why an American visiting Timbuktu can vote for president but an American resident of San Juan cannot?" An American who is a resident of San Juan, and who is visiting Timbuktu, can not vote for president. The US has a concept of "states" and a concept of "territories". There are various differences, ...


5

There is very little historical precedent. Only two such referendums have been held, for Alaska and Hawaii, with large majorities in favour of statehood in both cases (more than 80% in Alaska, more than 90% in Hawaii) Prior to this there were votes to ratify a proposed constitution, with 71% approval in Oklahoma, though its not clear how many of the 29% ...


4

Your question seems to be built upon an understanding of the Jones act that doesn't mesh with reality. The act has nothing to do with tarrifs, but with requirements for any ship engaging in Cabotage in the United States. It is obviously still protectionist in that it requires the ships to be american made, the crews to be primarily american, and the ...


4

Residents of Puerto Rico are not entitled to vote because Puerto Rico is part of the United States commonwealth. A territory part of the US Common wealth is "An organized United States insular area, which has established with the Federal Government, a more highly developed relationship, usually embodied in a written mutual agreement", according to ...


3

@Brythan is correct in terms of the practical process that would likely be followed. Constitutionally, there is a specific requirement: New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts ...


3

We can look at the 2012 voter turn out for a similar turnout 1 . In this we can see that Statehood had won with 61%. In this election we can see that over 500,000 blank votes were submitted in protest due to a more developed version of their current status not being on the ballot. So what's happened since 2012. Well the improved current status is still ...


3

According to the article in Wikipedia, the last two titles have the same function in the United States. Wikipedia appears to say that the usage of the two terms is for historical reasons, but that they are currently identical in function. Wikipedia states at Resident Commissioner The Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico does not reside there but ...


3

They would almost certainly fold into the national parties. It would be very difficult to remain independent once national politics come into play. Puerto Rico would gain a House seat and two Senators. Candidates would take major party funding to campaign (thus assuring they caucus with that party). Those politicians would likely then draw their political ...


3

The language barrier there isn't merely an inconvenience. The English-Spanish debate has been contentious there before In 1991 the government of Puerto Rico, under the administration of PPD's Rafael Hernández Colón, made Spanish its sole official language through a law that was commonly called the "Spanish-only Law." In recognition of the ...


1

Because Americans in Timbuktu pay federal income tax, unlike those in Puerto Rico, and there's "no taxation without representation." D.C. residents get to vote for president for the same reason.


1

Congress has been toying with Puerto Rico since just after the second world war, by dangling the carrot of statehood in front of them, but always finding a reason not to grant it. The usual reason given is there just is not enough support for it among the residents. This election ended up with a 97% support for statehood. This, combined with an over 60% ...


1

The only two similar cases are the two you have already noted. The D.C. case is widely regarded as a success, but not because of improvement in the economy. The purpose of both that oversight board for D.C. and Puerto Rico are to resolve the governments budgetary problems. Both governments had/have enormous debts far in excess of their ability to repay. ...


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