New answers tagged

46

True, but. This is a classic case of being true on paper but needing extensive qualifiers to be properly understood by a modern day audience. At the time when Jim Crow laws were introduced – 150 to 100 years ago, approximately – the US political arena was very different from what it is today. While the two main parties had been the Republican and Democratic ...


74

Yes. Following the American Civil War, the Democratic party was the primary haven for America's most machiavellian racists, (some of which set also included active criminals and terrorists), who labored tirelessly to subvert, frustrate, and stymie many of the postwar reforms, in a too often successful effort to continue a de facto slavery by other means and ...


2

It obviously depends on the definition of racism. If we take Oxford dictionary's definition Prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against a person or people on the basis of their membership of a particular racial or ethnic group, typically one that is a minority or marginalized. racism - Oxford dictionary Also take the definition of affirmative ...


6

There's a lot of evidence, but the two strongest and irrefutable ones are: Discrimination in employment. It's been shown in studies that, all else being equal, an applicant with whitish names like "Greg" will receive more callbacks than a blackish name like "Lakisha". https://cos.gatech.edu/facultyres/Diversity_Studies/...


8

The New York Times ran this story in April (before George Floyd) As the coronavirus continues to spread, infecting and killing African-Americans at disproportionately high rates, black men find themselves facing two concerns: the virus and those who see their covered faces as threatening. It later notes this In March, before the C.D.C. issued its ...


3

According to the Black Lives Matter website, one of the partner organizations that Black Lives Matter supports is called the Movement for Black Lives. The Wikipedia article on the Movement for Black Lives includes a discussion of this coalition's original platform. It's six general points are: End the war on black people Reparations Invest-Divest Economic ...


4

There is one problem that is at the base, before even starting machine learning. It does not necessarily have a large practical effect, but it is unavoidable. For illustration, imagine a face image of a low-resolution CCTV camera, or a face image that is small and hard to recognize in general. Under low light conditions, there is less contrast between ...


8

The fears of racism associated with facial recognition technology aren't just in relation to the fact that early examples worked better on Caucasian faces. In fact, in An Other-Race Effect for Face Recognition Algorithms, Phillips et al. show that the racial bias extant in humans, in that people are generally better at recognising members of their own race ...


5

tl;dr– Those who think that law-enforcement is racist are liable to be concerned that anything that'd empower law-enforcement would further its perceived racism. Some are concerned that empowering racists would further racism. The concern's probably just: Police do racist things. Facial-recognition would help the police. Therefore, facial-...


12

In addition to the other answers, there's also the issue of using facial recognition to predict criminality of an individual. For example: this The Intercept article. For clarity, the research paper was specifically published to highlight these fears, not as a serious attempt to predict criminality, but still serves to highlight the origin of fears around ...


73

People often have the mistaken belief that computers are inherently objective and unbiased – and while they may not hold prejudices themselves, the results that they produce reflect the biases and assumptions of their programmers. This is particularly clear with machine learning systems, where the predictions they give out are dependent on data set used to ...


23

Every new technology used for policing is thought to lead to racist results, because it is assumed that policing as currently practiced leads to racist results. Here's a blog post from 4 years ago that discusses a number of technologies that law enforcement was considering using in Northern California: https://www.aclunc.org/blog/together-we-can-put-stop-...


39

Let me set aside, for the moment, the question of whether current facial recognition technology (FRT) accurately distinguishes the facial features of non-whites. There is some evidence that it does not, but that is a technological problem which could (assumedly) be ironed out. The more pressing problem is that technology does not think at all in the sense ...


0

A question like this is actually better suited for the skeptics then politics, luckily skeptics have already covered the question here: Are African Americans victims of a disproportionate number of police killings? The short version is that it's complicated, there are definitely a higher proportion of police shootings of black then white individuals once ...


2

I think some of the confusion here stems from what is meant by the term "racism". Consider the following reasonable and not even mutually-exclusive definitions of racism: Racism is an intention to cause harm or a judgement of inferiority solely on the basis of ethnicity. Racism is an implicit bias for or against particular ethnic groups based on ...


5

I'm not sure this is a politics question, but my advice would be to look for actions, especially those that come at a potential cost to the organization, not just words: Donating money is a start, and the simplest and most universal thing an organization can do. Depending on the company, even symbolic actions can be significant. For example, NASCAR banning ...


7

Some of the strongest evidence we have about currently existing racial bias with economic consequences comes from resume studies and other kinds of carefully controlled field experiments. It has been shown again and again over decades that if you send employers the exact same resumes with either stereotypically white or stereotypically black names on them to ...


5

This question seems to stem from some amount of confusion, that discrimination operates on two mutually exclusive axes, one describing race and one describing class. In reality, the two are closely related. A quick example from wiki The Pew Research Center's analysis of 2009 government data says the median wealth of white households is 20 times that of ...


2

The killing of George Floyd was a disgusting act caught on video and widely published. The video produced a strong emotional reaction which spurred many people to action (to do something, anything, right now), and the emotion seemed to sustain itself. Soon, the focus of the protest moved almost completely beyond the facts of the case involving Floyd. ...


12

tl;dr: The death of George Floyd was not an isolated incident, it's the larger system people want to change. These 4 officers were charged, but convictions in police misconduct cases are exceedingly rare. See for example Five Thirty Eight's statistics, and the riots after the police charged with use of excessive force on Rodney King were acquitted (back ...


Top 50 recent answers are included