91

The premise in your question, about Muslims preferring Europe over rich Middle-Eastern countries, is false. In fact, Syrian refugees prefer neighbouring Middle-Eastern countries over rich ones. More than 6 million Syrians are internally displaced within their own country, accounting for about half (49%) of all displaced Syrians worldwide. More than ...


50

Implicit in your question is the assumption that Muslims should have some kind of kindred sympathy toward their Muslim brethren in other countries. We have to dispense with that kind of thinking; it's not really true of any race, culture, or religion anywhere in the world. Western Europeans dislike immigration from eastern European countries (in fact, EU ...


32

An important factor here is the treaties a country has signed up to. In this case, a relevant one is the 1951 Refugee Convention. From UNHCR: The 1951 Refugee Convention is the key legal document that forms the basis of our work. Ratified​ by 145 State parties, it defines the term ‘refugee’ and outlines the rights of the displaced, as well as the legal ...


29

There were apparently no laws for asylum seekers in any Gulf countries until autumn 2018. Qatar: Gulf’s First Refugee Asylum Law [...] Qatar passed Law No. 11/2018 on Organizing Political Asylum on September 4, 2018, alongside two other laws regulating residency in the country. One abolished exit permits for most migrant workers, and the other allows people ...


28

First let's take a look at the definition of the word Realpolitik: Politics based on practical and material factors rather than on theoretical or ethical objectives Under that definition there are two possible reasons: Avoiding a situation where European soldiers/border guards shoot unarmed men, women and children Helping prevent further destabilization ...


27

It's probably part of the pressure/negotiation tactics of Ankara, as they have a long history of threatening Europe with this: Turkish government representatives, and even President Recep Tayyip Erdogan himself, have regularly threatened to withdraw from the deal and "open the gates" over the past several years. In fact, Erdogan began making such ...


25

The key convention is the 1951 refugee convention. The key points to this instrument is that refugees should not be returned to a country where they are under threat. Technically a person only becomes a refugee when they cross a border. "Under threat" means "having a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, ...


23

Really the compulsion is a moral and practical one, rather than something enforced by international law: refugees tend to arrive in large numbers, turning them away is both difficult and tends to get them killed. It may be difficult to deport people to a war zone, e.g. if there are no functioning airports. The shadow of the Holocaust hangs over 20th-century ...


18

There are several rich "Muslim" states in Middle East: Kuwait, Qatar, UAE, Bahrain and so on. It seems that none of them want to receive Syrian, Iraqi, North African and other Muslim refugees. Muslim refugees mostly do not go to rich Middle Eastern countries because they are going to middle-income or poor ones. Lebanon is very nearby, and arguably has a ...


16

The primary reason why countries take refugees in the first place are humanitarian concerns. The EU Charter of Fundamental Human Rights Articles 18 and 19 say: Article 18 The right to asylum shall be guaranteed with due respect for the rules of the Geneva Convention of 28 July 1951 and the Protocol of 31 January 1967 relating to the status of refugees and ...


15

”Free movement” in the EU primarily applies inside the EU, i.e. it regulates relationships between EU countries. Regarding the free movement of people, it means that it applies to EU citizens themselves (and only incidentally to their family or to long-term residents). There are EU rules pertaining to third-country nationals but they have always been much ...


14

He didn't. Although this quote is often misattributed to Benn, including recently in the House of Commons itself by Bell Ribeiro-Addy MP (Hansard), the quote actually comes from the Scottish journalist and writer Neal Ascherson. Writing for the Independent in January 1996, Ascherson describes his take on the al-Masari affair in an article entitled If we ...


13

No, there are no limits, simple as that. Countries typically don't want more refugees than they absolutely have to accept (and, in spite of what you might have heard, that very much include Germany) but there is nothing preventing them from providing protection to anybody who meets the definition if they want to. Case in point: You might have heard of the ...


11

TL;DR: Europe is a) merely being pragmatic about the situation and b) acting in its long-term self-interest. First off, keep the numbers in perspective. However massive the recent influx of migrants looked to European eyes, the scale of the problem is even larger. Arab countries are dealing with an order of magnitude more migrants than Europe. Next, ...


11

The right to asylum is an inherently moral issue, and removing that aspect of it is nonsensical. But as that is your question: Ignoring the countless moral arguments, there are a couple of realpolitik benefits that are sometimes named. Direct benefits to the country taking refugees: Increased economic growth (German source): Refugees do not save up any ...


11

There are many refugees stuck in camps inside their own country or somewhere close but if you can escape that fate, developing countries have never been very attractive. Going there really only makes sense from the perspective of the developed countries who would like to get rid of the problem (“If you are really fearing for your life, why isn't Turkey good ...


11

Hopefully the analysis I have found is current. Quite possibly, they will be or will have already implemented new measures for dealing with integration. German integration following a 2005 law uses a "two track approach". First, immigrants are offered integration courses. These courses include "600 hours of instruction in German as a foreign language, and a ...


11

The difference is where you are. There is no contradiction. In the country you are fleeing from, you are a deserter. In the country you are fleeing to, you are an asylum seeker. The same is true for many other reasons people flee governments. E.g. if you say things the ruler dislikes, you are a "subversive dissident" to that country, and would be ...


10

I don't think the Palestinians have a special status in the general sense. People born in refugee camps are usually counted as refugees. The Nakivale refugee camp in Uganda was established in 1958 for Rwandan refugees and the people living there are still tended to by the UNHCR. The Geneva Conventions definition of refugee: A. For the purposes of the ...


10

There is a vast difference in the immigrant and refugee acceptance in those two parts of the world. It has both cultural and economical grounds. EU and friends (Turkey included, edit: to lesser extent, but still here: Lebanon and Jordan): most of the society's wealth comes from people working and creating products and services. The fact is recognized at ...


10

To quote from your question [bold emphasis mine]: The Canadian government have started processing the refugee applications for Afghanistan whose lives are being endangered by the increasing advances of the Taliban. If they are not in Afghanistan, their lives are not being endangered by being in Afghanistan, ergo, they don't require any protection. A lot ...


9

Starting in March 2011 there was a major civil war in Syria, many people were displaced by the fighting and tried to escape, to Turkey and to Europe. There were a great number of refugees, many living in miserable conditions. Many countries across Europe offered to accept refugees, as part of their humanitarian duty. Refugees often go on to make a positive ...


9

A refugee is someone fleeing a war-torn country. A migrant is someone seeking to move to a country for economic (or familial, etc) reasons. The EU accepts refugees for compassionate reasons. If the refugee were to be sent back to their country of origin, they are likely to be killed. There often isn't time to take a language course if bombs are falling on ...


8

There was the case of Horst Mahler, a former far left activist and lawyer (and member of the terrorist group Red Army Faction) and now far right intellectual. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison for holocaust denial and fled to Hungary, seeking asylum for political persecution. It was denied (sources in German). As @chirlu pointed out in the comments, ...


7

For Germany, article 16a of the constitution in general guarantees asylum to those victim of political persecution. Furthermore, Germany (and Sweden) is a party of the Geneva refugee conventions of 1951 and 1967. Finally, they are both EU members and thus subject to directive 2011/95/EU which handles subsidiary protection for people who do not qualify for ...


7

Within the Schengen area there are supposed to be no identity checks when you travel across borders. Hence once someone is physically within the area there is nothing to stop them travelling to any other part of it (with the possible exception of travel across the sea, where you might need to show ID to get on a ferry or airplane). There might be a legal ...


7

8 years ago (in 2012) when this refugee crises started, the streets of cities in Turkey were full of Syrians. They were cutting your way asking for money, collecting food from trash. Today (in 2020) you can not see anybody in the streets. Somehow they were absorbed into the system. The official number is 4.7 million people. And Turkey is not a rich country. ...


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