305

Yes, there was the case of Netflix and Comcast for example. The events were basically these: Comcast noticed that Netflix is responsible for a lot of traffic of their private internet customers. Comcast asked Netflix to pay for a better quality of service to their customers. They refused. Comcast started throttling Netflix. The bandwidth available between ...


157

Here's a comment that's been circulating on reddit discussing the answer to this question. I didn't write it, but I thought it had excellent information. It was originally posted (as far as I can tell) by u/The_Brutally_Honest in an r/OutOfTheLoop thread about Net Neutrality. Here's the link to the comment. Also for anyone who tells you that "Net ...


90

No. There is no regulation that prevents a citizen from repairing themselves any kind of electronic device. The problem is that there is also no regulation that requires electronics companies to provide documentation or standardization of parts for the repair of these devices. This means that your company (let's say a company making TVs) can obfuscate ...


86

Labels like "conservative" versus "liberal" or "left" versus "right" are often applied to larger-scale political movements, parties or ways of thinking, without every single detail being thrown into the mix. The labels mean different things in different environments anyway: what is called "right wing conservative capitalist" in some European countries might ...


82

There have been a few examples, in part, these examples have pushed this more into the spotlight. It's often under the term 'traffic shaping' if you are interested, here is Sandvine, a company that offers those shaping services. If you are interested in the peer2peer domain (which is heavily bringing this issue to the forefront) here is a national list of ...


76

Citing Economist.com coverage The state’s deregulated power market is also fiercely competitive. ERCOT oversees the grid, while power generators produce electricity for the wholesale market. Some 300 retail electricity providers buy that fuel and then compete for consumers. For years the benefits of Texas’s deregulated market structure were clear. At 8.6 ...


68

You also can take a look at mobile internet products in Portugal: Now assume you have the VIDEO pack because you watch Twitch a lot. If you now decide to get some streaming service, will it be Netflix where you already have the traffic covered in your package or will it be e.g. Amazon Prime? If this then really a "free market" where you freely decide ...


63

As a general rule, regulation transfers costs from consumers to producers, while deregulation transfers costs from producers to consumers. In this specific case, that works out like so: With regulation, energy producers would be required to take precautionary steps to ensure the security and viability of the power grid, and could be held accountable for ...


45

This mostly had to do with (as usual, confusing) political terminology and branding. "Liberal" in USA has several meanings, mainly, either (1) "classical liberal" (which in USA is typically branded as "libertarianism" - although it's still called plain "liberalism" in Europe where the term originated); and, wholly independently, (2) "political liberal" - ...


36

Comcast, in the face of cable cutting, is now applying usage caps on their data services, but continues to provide unlimited access to their video feeds. Comcast loses ~$38 in "contribution margin" per cord-cutter Since their service has been all-digital (everywhere?) for a decade or so, it's clear that they are penalizing their data-only customers in order ...


29

As an example of something Net Neutrality rules have effectively blocked, Verizon lawyers admitted in court of law that given the opportunity, they probably would throttle or even completely block content. ... the judges asked whether the company [Verizon] intended to favor certain websites over others. “I’m authorized to state from my client today,” ...


26

I'm not American, and would only sometimes vote Republican if I were, so your question is not directly addressed to me. Nonetheless the debate about climate change crosses national borders so I believe I can still contribute a useful answer on one of your points. You write, "...they support the laissez faire (economics) but they don't accept the green ...


26

I don't think there's any one law or regulation that does this. Instead, we have old laws being used in new ways. While the Electronic Frontier Foundation is in the US, they describe the problem as this [U]ntil it breaks and you want to fix it yourself (or take it to a local repair shop you trust). Or you think of a way to make it work better that requires ...


22

Your assumption of a US-EU treaty to enforce fines seems like it is one of two intended enforcement methods, the other being the required establishment of representatives to ensure non-EU entities have at least some physical presence in the EU. The GDPR requires non-EU entities handling EU data to appoint a representative in the EU, and this representative ...


22

I'll point out here that the cheaper-than-average electricity prices that TX sees (according to the answer based on the Economist) is actually somewhat of a recent thing. Despite TX avoiding "the feds" for decades, for the 2000-2010 decade their prices mostly tracked the national average. And as a difference graph: (If someone can find ...


21

There's a particularly important phenomenon at work here: things are harder to believe in if they're costly. For example, someone may say "I'm 100% sure my sportsball team will win that game," but that same person will probably be unlikely to make a $1000 bet at 100:1 odds against them that their team will win. When believing something has costs people ...


20

The current regulation 2018/848 has: 1.5.2.1. Where animals become sick or injured despite preventive measures to ensure animal health, they shall be treated immediately. 1.5.2.2. Disease shall be treated immediately to avoid suffering of the animal. Chemically synthesised allopathic veterinary medicinal products, including antibiotics, may be used ...


15

In 2005, Telus, a Canadian telecom, censored a union's website from its Internet subscribers when its workers went on strike. (While that wasn't an action to favour its business partners, it was certainly an action to hurt its business enemy.)


14

Homeopathic products are essentially water (or some other solvent). While they don’t do anything useful beyond a possible placebo effect (which may or may not exist for animals), they aren’t directly harmful either; in particular not to humans who eat meat or dairy from animals “treated” by homeopathy. This food safety aspect is probably all the regulation ...


13

At the start, your analogies don't work. You're errantly assigned the majority of the opposition to the liberal viewpoint to conservatives. Abortion: While the liberal position is about extending the personal freedom of the woman involved, the conservative viewpoint is about protecting the freedoms of the unborn. In this argument, the liberal opinion ...


13

To complement Giter's excellent answer, procedures to collect internationally already exist through the typical judicial channels. In a nutshell, the judge issuing the fine in the EU would forward the case to a judge in the company's country, and the latter would then consider whether to enforce the collection or not. Fined companies could fight the ...


13

In the general sense, yes -- the US Govt. has many laws and regulations all corporations doing business in the USA must comply with and conform to. But there's no evidence that YouTube et al giving Alex Jones the boot was an instance of some legal or regulatory imperative, and no need to speculate about secret reasons when the public reasons are cogent ...


12

Not just guns In the United States, liberals believe in higher taxes and spending on social priorities. Conservatives want lower taxes and social spending. In campaign finance in the US, liberals want restrictions to how much campaigns can raise from individuals. Conservatives are against restrictions. Even in areas like gay rights, the freedom/...


12

In the best scenario, a government won't regulate an industry until there is a clear and distinct problem that requires regulation. First, a demonstrable public ill related to the activities of the industry must come into evidence. Second, the industry itself must show an inability or unwillingness to address that public ill. Then (and only then) will ...


12

Honestly I think some of what you heard was posturing from people who were upset that social media was moderating their content or the content of people that they supported. Evidence of this would be the drive to remove section 230 of the communications decency act that shields social media platforms from the content that the users publish. https://www.eff....


11

It might be a result of the edit, but your question appears to be missing a key element. Everything else you listed are things that individual people can pay more to get. The internet equivalent would be paying more to your ISP for a higher tier of broadband to your home. The discussions of "internet fast lanes" are for companies paying ISPs for a faster ...


11

You don't need that exact statement, but per 52 USC § 30120(d)(1)(B) you do need to have a statement that identifies the candidate and states that the candidate has approved the communication. Such statement— (i) shall be conveyed by— (I) an unobscured, full-screen view of the candidate making the statement, or (II) the candidate in voice-over, accompanied ...


11

For a whole host of reasons (reasons that are best suited being listed in an answer to a different question), conservatives congregate in suburban and rural settings. Liberals are in urban and metropolitan areas. Princeton Historian Kevin Kruse, made this point succinctly: "There are certain things in which the physical nature of a city, the fact the ...


11

Another example would be AT&T's Sponsored Data program. Engadget talks about the fcc accusing them of Net Neutrality violations here. The list goes on and on you don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure anytime a corporation wants something it can't be for the benefit of the public, unless they are a non-profit.


11

Attorneys General of 47 states sent a letter to Congress in July of 2013 recommending that the civil and criminal immunity in Section 230 be removed. So there is broad support for doing something to address internet companies' responsibilities, but it is hard to find agreement on what should be done. The ACLU came out in opposition to weakening the law's ...


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