239

Why couldn't they pass a single one of their many, previously-successful proposals under a Republican president? The simple answer is that you're measuring "successful" by how many votes were garnered in Congress. This is a slippery measure. Voting to repeal the Affordable Care Act when the sitting President (Obama) is guaranteed to veto your repeal is ...


183

The Democrats were in favour of appointing Garland in 2016, but now that the Republicans have set a precedent that Supreme Court Justices should not be appointed in an election year, the Republicans are being asked to stick to it. The Democrats are simply asking the Republicans to stick to the principles they used four years ago. The Republicans are the ones ...


135

Because polling data and Trump's approval rating do not tell the whole story. As right-wing political commentator Ben Shapiro is fond of saying, two things can be true at once: It's entirely possible to both despise President Trump's character, bombastic personality, and divisive rhetoric AND simultaneously appreciate what he has done and is trying to ...


131

Why are the Republicans being criticized? Because in 2016 they didn't simply say it was party politics as the reason to oppose Obama's choice, nor even that they disagreed with his choice. They chose to portray this as a matter of principle. On principle, they declared that they believed a new Justice should not be appointed in an election year, because it ...


97

The predominant explanation, especially since President Trump's victory in 2016, has been that the recent Republican presidential campaign efforts aren't even attempting to win the popular vote, and instead focus on winning the electoral college. For example, Trump himself, a week after winning the election, claimed that he would have campaigned differently ...


96

The answer is First Past The Post. The nature of the voting system is such that many people who would rather support a 3rd Party feel compelled to vote against the party that they like the least, rather than for the party they support the most, because their preferred candidate is unlikely to win the race anyway and thus they are simply removing support from ...


95

It may seem like a tautology, but Trump is popular where he is popular. Such is the case with divisive figures. In order to remain in office, politicians in those areas where Trump is popular feel the need to heed the will of their own personal constiuency and embrace Trump. To be fair, an opinion I share is that some of the popularity that Trump receives ...


78

A better way to look at this question is to ask why Democrats do have such an expansive superdelegate system (Republicans kiiiiiiiiind of have superdelegates, but far less and bound to the results of state primaries). In 1968, the Democratic Party's primary system was exposed as more or less a farce. Due to a lot of unforeseen circumstances-- such as ...


76

I think the misunderstanding comes from how conservatives complain about bias in media and tech. Conservatives often don't call for government action, they just want to shed light on the injustices. For example: “Some of us tell the truth about our government, they call us treasonous and say we’re speaking out of line and they’d like to punish us, and I ...


74

American political parties are essentially standing coalitions that do their coalition building before elections instead of after What is typical in Europe and other parts of the world is for a collection of smaller parties to win to varying degrees in elections, and after the elections are over, form the whatever coalition is necessary to govern. Here in ...


73

Rather than trying to address the claim of who is to blame, I will focus on the part of the question asking for the spefic actions that were taken and give you timeline of events to let you decide for yourself who deserves how much of the blame. 19th December, 2018: Senate passes without any dissent by voice vote a bi-partisan short-term spending bill ...


72

As Kevin Drum found (from the Washington Monthly), from 1976 to 2004, the incumbent party's coloring alternated. As it happened, from 1976 through 1996, this meant that the Republicans were the blue party five of six times (1988 was the exception). But no one particularly noticed. In 2000 and 2004, the Republicans were the red party by that system. And ...


67

"They had things—levels of voting that, if you ever agreed to it, you'd never have a Republican elected in this country again." Donald Trump on Fox and Friends “Just what America needs, another paid holiday and a bunch of government workers being paid to go out and work ... [on Democratic] campaigns,” he snarked on the Senate floor. “This is the ...


65

Using the Cooperative Congressional Election Study 2018, we can test your hypothesis that non-African Americans skew as far to the Republicans as African Americans do to Democrats. Let's limit ourselves firstly to voters in the deep south, which I'll define as Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, & South Carolina. This gives us a survey population ...


65

The main reason for this is down to one question: who won the argument in 2016? Because the Republicans had a majority in the Senate in 2016, it was them who decided how Obama's nomination would be handled. The position of the Democrats would not have affected the outcome in any way. Similarly, in 2020, as the Republicans have a majority in the Senate, they ...


63

Short Answer What is legally required to partition a U.S. State? Under the U.S. Constitution, a partition of a state must be approved by Congress in a simple law, and by any state whose territory is impacted by the partition. That's it. Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution is controlling and it says: New states may be admitted by the ...


61

Because they can't credibly convert Trump supporters. The popular narrative is that Donald Trump's election represents some sort of "whitelash" against Democrats, Obama supporters, human decency, etc. But rich racist white people voted for Romney and McCain too. We just elected a liberal intellectual African American president. Twice. The people who voted ...


58

It's not that the Republicans couldn't pass the AHCA, but that they didn't want to. It is difficult to just repeal the ACA, which is why the Republicans went from a repeal-only to a repeal-and-replace approach. The AHCA was what Trump and Ryan wanted to use as replacement, but it was widely unpopular among Republican and Democratic politicians as well as ...


55

Rural voters aren't afraid to go to the polls to keep a conservative state supreme court justice in power. The April 2020 ballot does include the U.S. presidential primary, but that will have little effect on state politics. After I first posted this answer, the New York Times echoed many of the points I make below, starting with: Former Vice President ...


53

I think the best is for you to dive into the following two podcasts (both have a transcript) of Chris Hayes interviewing Dale Ho, one of the attorneys who filed the lawsuit (and won) against the Trump administration: Uncovering the Trump scheme to rig the census with Dale Ho Discussing the census decision with Dale Ho For what reason do Trump and the ...


53

Republicans prevented this change because at the core it is beneficial to their electoral prospects. There are many layers to fully understanding this issue, but to address it in brief I think a few facts are sufficient. One, the proportion of Republican voters is larger in rural areas than urban areas, see here. The dangers of COVID-19 are more ...


49

No, Trump is not the official nominee until the Republican National Convention says so. A number of things could go wrong (or right, depending on your politics) to prevent Donald Trump from becoming the Republican party presidential candidate. The first thing to realize is the rules for "pledged" delegates vary by state. In the Republican Party system ...


49

Gerald Ford came close to losing to Ronald Reagan in the Republican Party presidential primaries of 1976. For a variety of reasons it could be argued that's not precedent, but it certainly shows a challenger can put up a fight. So I'd conclude there is no obligation to renominate, or prohibition of alternate candidates. The convention tally reported ...


48

The issue is the mis-characterization of Obama as "very friendly". The fact that a country signs a treaty with other does not mean that they are "friends" per se. Obama (together with 4 other parties) signed a treaty with Iran to dismantle Iran's nuclear program, and in exchange removed some of the sanctions that the USA and other countries were applying to ...


46

Americans on the Right tend to be Evangelical Christians. As Jerusalem is holy to Christians (as well as being central to several Christian prophecies), there is a decently broad base of Christians who support Israel. This is evidenced by the demographic that tends to tour Israel At the moment, with security worries since the last Gaza war eased, the ...


46

which seems symmetrically inconsistent No, they're not. The Republicans are asking that precedent established by them be disregarded because it benefits them. Democrats are asking that precedent be respected. So it's not symmetric. There is a difference between arguing for A, then arguing for B, versus arguing for (A and B). Suppose your company offers you ...


44

@tim has given a good answer in terms of the specific vote. However it's also worth looking at the reason why the Republicans couldn't get behind a replacement. The problem that the Republicans face is that the key elements of Obamacare were actually Republican ideas. This paper from the Heritage Foundation outlines the main points which were later ...


42

The high level reason is fairly simple. DNC poses more of a threat to libertarian ideals and way of life than GOP. The main philosophical concern of Libertarians is reduction of violence (or a threat of violence) and coercion in political life. All of the other things that characterize libertarians stem from that high level point. In practice, the main ...


41

I’m sure there is something that I am missing (certain vote percentages, loopholes, who knows), but to me the logic seems that if Republicans had the ability to pass the funding measure and then didn’t, wouldn’t the shutdown be the Republicans fault? I think there are a couple things: first, the new Democratic majority; and second, the filibuster/cloture ...


40

Sanders ran on a platform promising to shake up the elites that take wealth away from the people, serve corporate interests and provide limited services to poor people. He definitely ran as an outsider, separate from regular Democrats. His message resonated well with younger people and I assume that it was more appealing to people who would benefit most ...


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