132

This relates to the Russian government's controversial decision to declare that the majority of workers should not go to work in April due to the COVID-19 pandemic, while also mandating that these workers should still be paid by their employers. As this Reuters article puts it: “They say ‘pay the salaries’, but no one explains where you’re supposed to ...


67

This is how I see it: The joke works just as well in English as it does in Russian. It is making fun of Putin (and maybe at the same time complimenting him), but how? Suppose a rich man walks into a bar. If he is the right sort of person, maybe he says “Drinks on me!” and buys for everyone. Suppose another case, the owner of the bar gets some good news. ...


5

As I see it, the point of the joke is not who pays for the drinks, but what is being paid for... Under "normal" circumstances, someone going into a packed bar and saying, "The drinks are on me", or (a landlord saying), "The drinks are on the house" is an offer of generosity. Under COVID-19 lockdown, with bars closed, this is very much an "empty gesture", ...


4

Technically speaking, there is nothing that stops the US from getting data on Russia from US allies. But note that this creates difficulties. As a signatory, the US can begin a flyover into any other signatory state, with nothing but 72 hours notification, and can send its plane wherever it likes within that state. If it withdraws, the US will become ...


3

Absolutely nothing prevents allies from sharing information obtained during Open Skies flights with other nations. Furthermore, other NATO member nations are now better equipped than the US to operate Open Skies flights. Germany for example has spent on the order of 60 million euros to equip and certify a modern Airbus A319 jet for use under the treaty, ...


3

Given the benefit of hindsight, it is now clear that this was not a formal use of the veto as it was not a resolution put to a formal vote, and was instead a so-called 'hidden' veto. A similar occasion where both the US and Russia have threatened to veto a resolution, resulting in it not being put to a formal vote, occurred in April 2019, when a British-...


2

While Russian 'closed cities' really do not and have not existed in the United States, there are cities through U.S. history that have been restricted from the public. In 1943, three cities were created for the Manhattan Project, including the city of Oak Ridge, TN. More than 125,000 scientists and technicians who were part of the Manhattan Project lived ...


2

The Soviet Union had the Central Committee and the Politburo. The Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was the executive leadership of the USSR while the Politburo was a political bureau and the highest policy-making authority in the Communist Party that was founded in October of 1917 and people in the bureau were elected by the ...


1

To add to the answers above, the Democracy Index ranks Russia as an authoritarian regime. Basically, Russia ranks as a 3.11 as of 2019, making it an authoritarian regime by the indexes' standards and below a flawed democracy like the United States or even a hybrid regime like Liberia. The index is based around "60 indicators grouped in five different ...


1

Whatever Trump's actual positions on Russia, and they seem more benign than Hillary's would have been, a massive benefit is his lack of credibility with his allies. IF Trump wanted to take a hard line with Russia, for whatever reason, his chances of convincing the already normally timid Europeans to do so are much less than almost any recent American ...


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