132

This relates to the Russian government's controversial decision to declare that the majority of workers should not go to work in April due to the COVID-19 pandemic, while also mandating that these workers should still be paid by their employers. As this Reuters article puts it: “They say ‘pay the salaries’, but no one explains where you’re supposed to ...


67

This is how I see it: The joke works just as well in English as it does in Russian. It is making fun of Putin (and maybe at the same time complimenting him), but how? Suppose a rich man walks into a bar. If he is the right sort of person, maybe he says “Drinks on me!” and buys for everyone. Suppose another case, the owner of the bar gets some good news. ...


55

First, who is #2 is highly subjective, if you discount nuclear arsenals. Second, this question is like asking Compared to a Ferrari a Mustang outruns tons of Priuses, Civics and SUVs. And it costs a lot less. Does that mean a Mustang is anywhere close to a Ferrari in speed? The US is, by virtue of its spending, #1, no question. It deliberately has ...


54

I'm not sure there's anything more than expert opinion as an answer: Levada sociologist Karina Pipiya told BBC Russian: "There is growing nostalgia for the Soviet period and Stalin as a leader. Stalin is seen as the main figure who defeated fascism, who gets the honours for victory in the Great Patriotic War. And that war victory is a symbol of national ...


53

Disclaimer: I'm no expert, this answer is based on my modest understanding of the situation at play. The OPEC decision to cut oil production was meant to keep prices high: if every OPEC country were selling all the oil they could, it would drive prices down since there would be more supply than demand. So if every OPEC country agrees to sell only a limited ...


38

The processes regarding the Russian government are described in Chapter 6 of the Constitution of the Russian Federation. The articles which are most relevant to this question are 111 (appointment of the government) and 117 (resignation of the government). In Russia, the government consists of the Prime Minister and the ministers. The ministers are appointed ...


35

I have no experience in the Russian or US military, but my impression is that Russian weapons manufacturers face much greater pressures to charge lower prices. US weapons manufactures consider the Pentagon a bottomless pit of money and face no pressure to reduce prices. 200 TOW missiles? Let's add a 3 extra zeros to the bill. Raytheon can charge whatever ...


26

The reason Russia didn’t want to do a production cut is because the US is not participating in this, since the US is also not part of OPEC and actually leaves all the oil production to market forces and in the decisions of private businessmen rather than state-controlled oil like most of OPEC. While it's true that Russia needs a higher oil price for their ...


25

According to wikipedia, this is the first time. Even in the 1990s, after the Cold War ended and when Russian political power was greatly reduced, the US and Russia never vetoed together.


24

Probably because his reign brought them into the position of 'world power'. The USSR may have fell apart, but that happened well after Stalin was no longer on charge. The USSR was a force to be reckoned with, but now, Russia has fallen off to the sidelines. They probably want their country to be the powerhouse it used to be. I'm not an expert, and this is ...


21

Obvious answer: the sanctions don't cover everything. And they probably don't have enough signalling effect on what they don't cover. However, that it took 5 years to reach 2014 levels again, is also not negligible, i.e. the sanctions were not entirely toothless either. There is probably more to be said about the world economic context in which this ...


20

You are coming at this from the wrong angle. Ask yourself: why do the French approve of Napoleon? They actually have extremely similar histories: A revolution happens, overthrowing the ancient monarchy -> in the course of it, some hick from a far-away mountain region of the empire, not of the native stock (Corsican/Georgian), seizes the reins of the ...


18

Another issue is PPP (purchase power parity). You're comparing the budgets in Forex equivalents, which is generally thought to seriously underestimate the Russian defence budget. Keep in mind that when it comes to selling arms, Russian companies need state approval. So the prices that they can sell internationally vs domestically can be substantially ...


17

Some short-term models of the economic effects of global warming do point to benefits for the Northern countries. In the long run however, the models tend to point to "everybody loses". But like with all long-run projections, it's harder to be certain of country-specific effects. From https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-018-0282-y


17

If we use the Democracy Index to quantify the level of democracy in a country, the answer would be no in the time from 2006 till today. The main problems nowadays in Russia are: limited freedom of press suppression of opposition no protection or even prosecution of minorities missing equality of people, for example prosecution of homosexuals probably rigged ...


16

The head of Rosneft, Igor Sechin, has long been convinced that the OPEC deal "plays into the hands of the United States" by making its shale oil industry profitable. Allegedly he finally managed to convince Putin to decline the deal in order to drive the US oil producers out of business.


15

Presumably yes: shift of climate should move more productive climate zones to those countries the carbon dioxide does not simply increase temperature, but instead retains heat, thus result is disproportionally strong in winters and nights (seems fine...) Northern sea routes become viable, thus shortening the trade route between Asia and Europe one exports ...


15

Vladimir Putin's personal opinion of Lenin seems overwhelmingly negative. It is often alleged this is owing to a personal desire to avoid stoking revolutionary sentiment. The national holiday observed during Soviet times in honour of the revolution was rebranded in 1996, and then discontinued in 2004. The 2017 centenary of the revolution was celebrated ...


14

I am a student learning the Russian language and interested in the Russian history and culture, and I have read many Russian articles, blogs, and materials about Russia, including discussions on Russian forums. I will now write my impressions and observations relevant to your question, and I hope that Russian users of SE will correct all inaccuracies in my ...


14

This is partly why some people have switched to "climate change". Warming sounds good, but the transition in the ecosystem can be pretty rough. For example, much worse forest fires in Russia. Russia also built cities and resource extraction infrastructure on permafrost. This is now melting, causing considerable damage.


13

There is no problem with democracy here. The US cannot forbid German citizens or companies to deal with Russia. The US can forbid US citizens or companies to deal with German citizens or companies who deal with Russia. That applies US law to US citizens who do something the US government and congress dislike. It might be a violation of trade agreements ...


12

Basically, as the article you mentioned explains further, it's part of the Putin-era effort to [re]glorify the Stalinist legacy, and in particular the WWII aspects thereof. Also, the trend appears to have been exacerbated by the post-2014 events (standoff with the West over the Crimean annexation etc.) The re-evaluation of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact ...


11

I live in Northern Canada, so I have a dog in this hunt, so to speak. We already see effects of global warming, and while some of them are presumably more pleasant (no, we don't see as much extreme cold in the winter anymore), you might be surprised at some of the unexpected consequences. We are seeing milder winters, but they're also much snowier and ...


11

If you look at history, there were Russian/Soviet bases on German soil in the recent past. While Germany was divided into the FRG and the GDR, there was the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany in East Germany. The repatriation of these forces was still ongoing during the German Reunification and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, which made them Russian ...


10

In their answer, Fizz has already provided the main reason: Obvious answer: the sanctions don't cover everything. Still, it's surprising that investments have already reached the level which the had before the sanctions were introduced. I looked for information on who is investing in Russia. In April German business newspaper Handelsblatt published an ...


9

The BBC also has an article on that documentary. Barring any translation errors, what Putin said was a less obvious admission of the methods, at least those prior to the events...: Mr Putin said on TV he had ordered work on "returning Crimea" to begin at an all-night meeting on 22 February. [...] "I invited the leaders of our special services and the ...


8

If Turkey has both the S-400 air defence system and the F-35, it will be able to test the two together. The US is worried that the opportunity to gather extensive data on detecting the F-35 with the S-400 system will allow Russia to improve its ability to detect and track that aircraft, and potentially other US aircraft too.


8

It bears looking at what exactly is being sanctioned. It is mentioned in the Wikipedia article you linked: On 16 February 2015, the EU increased its sanction list to cover 151 individuals and 37 entities. Australia indicated that it would follow the EU in a new round of sanctions. If the EU sanctioned new Russian and Ukrainian entities then Australia ...


8

If you're interested in an opinion from Russia, I'd say that: part of that approval is the rise of USSR indeed; part of that is neocommunist propaganda; part of that is forgetting those murdered ca. 1937/38; still another part migh be remembering Jugashvili ("Jewson" in Georgian) ousting Trotskists. For an average American to understand the last item more ...


8

One other point not mentioned is Syria. With Russia and its allies gaining the upper hand over Saudi supported forces, this could be considered an opening up an economic front in that conflict.


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