46

The US relationship with Pakistan is complicated, but for decades it was viewed as an ally. In the 1970's and 80's, India was somewhat friendly towards the Soviet Union (while remaining nonaligned). That encouraged a relationship between Pakistan and the US. After India developed a nuclear weapon, the US (as I understand it) looked the other way while ...


27

You can't bypass the dollar without having a comparably sized economy that is not dependent on the dollar. There are two big main factors that make replacing the dollar difficult. The practical one is you need a market that has the same volume as the dollar, moving billions of dollars is trivial (for moving billions). Secondly you need a market independent ...


25

To quote UK Essays. (November 2018). Geopolitical Position Of Pakistan History Essay, " Pakistan has a significant geopolitical position as it is situated in a region that is of high grandness due to its political, economic, and strategic position. " The primary reasons for the incentives that Pakistan enjoys from the US despite the repeated ...


23

As you can read on the wikipedia article on the topic, the direct reactions from most governments was mostly symbolic in form of official statements condemning the assassination, calls for investigations and statements of intend regarding future dealings with Saudi Arabia. Some countries, especially but not only in the Arab world, did actually take the side ...


10

There were some direct sanctions against individuals The United States imposed economic sanctions on 17 Saudi officials on Thursday for their role in the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, as Saudi Arabia’s public prosecutor sought the death penalty for five suspects in the murder. The measure was unusual for Washington, which rarely imposes ...


10

Some reasons why a CDBC (be it called "digital rouble" or more improperly "crypto-ruble") might not actually be that effective at bypassing US sanctions-- basically because simply using it will raise red flags and possibly attract US investigations and sanctions: the ability of a crypto-rouble to help Russia evade U.S. sanctions is ...


10

Executive actions can be changed by Biden without consulting Congress. So, for example the restrictions on travel from mainly Muslim countries was done by executive order. This order can be reversed on Jan 20th. Legislation passed in the last four years can't be repealed except by Congress, and repeal bills can be filibustered in the Senate. So, for example ...


8

Check out the old Aesop's fable The North Wind and the Sun if you're not already familiar with it. The point is that if you want someone to do something, threats are not the best way to make them do it. People in general do not like being coerced. They will do everything in their power to not acquiesce. They will complain about your bullying. It's not to say ...


7

Not a complete answer, but this is too long for a comment. Note that Google writes Google Workspace is available in most countries and regions. However, Google restricts access to some of its business services in certain countries or regions, such as Crimea, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Syria. You might note that all five examples given by Google have been ...


6

The US considers China a rising rival. In the case of Huawei there were 3 major factors to it being targeted: Political Clearly, the previous US administration made a big show of "standing up to China" and Huawei was a convenient pressure point. Claims that Huawei bypassed sanctions to Iran, which is the core of the Meng Wanzhou extradition case ...


4

Doubt it. China never traditionally bought much weaponry from the Europe/USA so it is very hard to see what important systems a 1989 embargo would have stopped being sold. China has had several weapon procurement phases since 1949: Soviet-supplied. This ran all the way up to the China-USSR skirmishes in the late 60s. (bad Russia relations): Indigenous ...


3

Yes, it is applied. It is impossible for Cuba to trade with the USA. The USA makes it difficult for other countries to trade with Cuba - not impossible but difficult. As an example, a communication from the Cuban government on the difficulties in coffee trade https://www.ico.org/documents/cy2020-21/ed-2355e-communication-cuba.pdf That may be dramatised for ...


3

Sanctions are a little like collective punishment in school, e.g. the teacher finds out that cheating took place on a test, so they dock everyone's grade regardless of culpability, in order that the students who cheated will face pressure from other students not to do so in the future. The collateral damage is the point. If you don't like it, and enough of ...


3

Chavez and Maduro's incompetence because the sanctions were only put in place after things got bad (one could argue that before fracking-led energy independence the US was more willing to turn a blind eye on bad behaviors within an oil producing country). 2014 - first protests that trigger sanctions. due to the country's high levels of urban violence, ...


3

Here is an overview about the process the EU uses for sanctions. But keep in mind that sovereign states are not required to allow trade with each other (unless they signed treaties to that effect, and in theory they could withdraw from treaties). So it comes down to the political will of the EU, and the EU is the union of sovereign states. Some are more ...


3

Potentially, yes. It would be interesting to find out how China draws the list of associated entities, and if a major US bank would rather retain their ties with China or with a former administration official. The US used such sweeping sanctions in a few cases, like Iran and North Korea, but then forgoing business with North Korea is usually no big deal. As ...


3

A (very) qualified 'Yes' There are actually two things to consider, first direct sanctions by the US against China, and second indirect sanctions through third parties, either because they have been convinced to go along or because they have been pressured to go along. Unilateral sanctions are not much different from the 'trade wars' we have seen time and ...


2

What is the timeframe of the question? Today China has a large and capable military. A generation ago it was even larger, but much less capable. Basically, they were forced to catch up on their own, which can be a mixed blessing. The RAND Corporation, an American think tank, has produced this report to show how far China has managed to narrow the gap. China ...


2

By selling oil to countries that don't care about US sanctions. The USA is not the entire World market. It's only a little bit of it.


2

There are several kinds of sanctions on Iran: Sanctions passed by the UN security council, which the UN considers binding on all nations. Those where rolled up into Resolution 2231 and the JCPOA, which the US unilaterally left. Sanctions passed by the US, and supported by other nations by US pressure tactics. Sanctions on a similar pattern passed by other ...


2

A US embargo is close to a worldwide embargo because the US assert their power all over the world and claims that any foreign business having at least one branch or office in the US is subject to US laws. For example they fined for dozen of Billions all the major European banks for violating US sanctions with Iran. [1] Thus not only few businesses dare to ...


2

A lot of things could happen if there was widespread sentiment to do it. Once upon a time, slavery was legal. Then some nations banned it. Then the military forces of some countries enforced that ban, pretty much worldwide. Over decades and centuries, what was once normal business practice became universally banned, but it was a long and uneven process. ...


2

Depends. Either C has enough influence in B to make B drop the matter, or B has enough influence in C to make C enact similar sanctions, or B sancions an entity in C, weakening the alliance, or B accepts that the sanctions are less than perfect. This tends to be significant mostly when B is the United States, since most other countries realize that their ...


1

While the cuban economy has its greatest enemy on its government, the US embargo is in practice, a global embargo. The responsible of that is the Helms-Burton law, which declares: International Sanctions against the Cuban Government. Economic embargo, any non-U.S. company that deals economically with Cuba can be subjected to legal action and that company's ...


1

The EU can't be too strong against Russia because they rely on Russia for oil and gas provided by pipelines. Russia can shut down pipelines leading to Eastern Europe if they so choose, so the EU has to remain somewhat friendly to Russia at all times. This is why the EU generally supports U.S. sanctions on Russia, because they can pass the blame to the U.S. ...


1

What draws attention (or not) from the international community and/or the media is a difficult question. Unavoidably, some issues get more coverage and/or more international reactions for many reasons. Here are some of the main factors: Novelty: sadly, when some event drags for a long period of time or the same kind of event happens repeatedly, the ...


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