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176

What point was she trying to make when she claimed Native American heritage? There's a few things to consider here Native Americans are a pretty well defined minority group, complete with an actual culture. Warren either sold herself, or heavily implied, that she was a minority, despite the fact that she was clearly not a member of that minority. She has ...


59

The current US Senate includes two Independent Senators who do not belong to either party but Caucus, which means to align with for counting purposes, with the Democrats. The Independent Senators are Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine. Despite being an Independent Senator, Bernie Sanders was in the Democratic Presidential Primary in 2016 and ...


57

It is not possible for Democrats to filibuster the nomination under the current Senate rules, due to Mitch McConnell's use of the 'nuclear option' in 2017 which allowed a nomination debate to be ended by a simple majority vote. In 2013, the Senate voted 52-48 to change the number of votes needed for a successful cloture vote (a vote to end a filibuster) on ...


56

The trivial answer is that its a political issue because she's a politician and a public figure, so its in several parties' interest to make a big deal about it. Unfortunately, that also means its in a lot of people's interest to pretend things are much simpler than they are. I think its really important to start here with some basic facts. The main one ...


54

Because the US Supreme Court does not have the authority to rule on whether an impeachment is constitutional. That power lies solely with the US Senate, as part Article I, Section 3 of the US Constitution: The Senate shall have the sole Power to try all Impeachments. It is worth remembering that the President is not the only position that is subject to ...


53

According to news reports, this has led to "power sharing agreements" needing to be made between the Ds and Rs. Why is this necessary? First, it's important to note that the VP is not a Senator and hence cannot vote unless the Senate is tied. A 50 seats + VP "majority" is not the same as an unequivocal 51 seats majority. This is an ...


51

No, the House of Representatives does not have the power to overrule a Senate veto. Article I, Section 7 is quite clear that a bill needs to pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate in order to become law. The two-chamber Congress was designed as a compromise between those founders who wanted every person to have an equal say in American ...


50

To pass, a bill needs to pass in the House and Senate and be signed by the President. Since the last election, Democrats took control of the House, so while the Obamacare repeal bills that failed in the Senate in 2017 might pass the Senate today, there's no way they would make it through the Democrat controlled House.


50

Why is the constitutionality of the issue not settled by these votes? Because Senate votes don't determine constitutionality and how the Senate conducts impeachment trials and why it does so in that manner is its own business. And if these votes are insufficient to settle the issue, how can it be resolved and why hasn't this avenue been pursued? It can't ...


46

Under normal circumstances, there is no difference. However, the Senate is not always full - Senators die or resign, or simply fail to make it to a vote. These were even more common situations when the Constitution was written. In situations where the number of voting Senators is not an even number, then granting the VP a full normal vote could produce a ...


44

Politically, it is a very fruitful issue for those who wish to have the most bang for their attack-ad dollar. The fact is, she checked Native American in addition to White in some post-hire Harvard survey to determine if their staff met diversity goals. While we can only guess at her motivation, the fact that it was done post-hire suggests it was not done ...


44

In the Senate, there is the so-called "Nuclear Option" that permits the rules of the Senate to be changed with a simple majority. These rules include the 60-vote rule to close debate, which functionally ends a filibuster. In recent memory the Nuclear Option was employed to end filibusters of judicial appointments of the Democrat controlled Senate ...


44

@divibisan but this question isn't about reviewing impeachments. It's about whether impeaching a former president is constitutional. @divibisan I do not understand your question. OP asks why it is the Senate voting on the question as opposed to the Supreme Court. The supreme court never rules on the constitutionality of anything unless that question has a ...


43

Votes have to be taken in the Senate chamber during an offical sitting of the Senate. A senator can't just pass a bill when they are alone in their office. They can't creep into the chamber in the dead of night and start passing laws. All the senators know when a vote is being held, and can attend or not. It is a public debate and a public vote. In the ...


39

Yes. Currently gerrymandering has no effect on US Senators. However, before the ratification of the 17th amendment to Constitution, Senators were elected/chosen by the state legislature. The state legislature, including its senators(at least in my state), have and have had districts. So, since gerrymandering started "officially" in 1812 and since the 17th ...


39

In official proceedings of the United States Congress, members are expected to maintain a high degree of decorum. The repeated "thanks" (even though he may not mean it), and "my good friend, the Senator from ..." (even though she hates him), may not be sincere, but is done anyway out of common decency and respect for the institution. So, they're not really ...


38

The other answers indicate that Trump has appointed an unusually large number of judges, but they don't quite get to how Trump was able to nominate so many more judges than previous presidents. Vox: What Trump has done to the courts, explained One reason is that the Senate under the final two years of Obama's term was controlled by Republicans, and under ...


35

It’s for “procedural reasons to preserve his right to bring the bill up again”. This article from the Washington Post explains why former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid always seemingly vote against his own party. It's that somebody on the winning side of the cloture vote — in this case, the side voting against cloture — has to file a "motion to ...


35

What is the reason for the date of the Georgia runoff elections for the US Senate? Law. Georgia Code Title 21. Elections § 21-2-501 (3) In the case of a runoff from a general election for a federal office or a runoff from a special primary or special election for a federal office held in conjunction with a general election, the runoff shall be held on the ...


32

Let's get academic about it. I think the term racism is often used to address a basket of discriminatory positions. The folks over at Oxford Dictionary on Racism Prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. So then we follow up with Race Each of the major ...


32

A short piece on PolitiFact published at the time in 2016 put Biden's 1992 speech in its political context: Biden's floor speech was on June 25, 1992, more than three months later in the election cycle than it is now. There was no Supreme Court vacancy to fill. There was no nominee to consider. The Senate never took a vote to adopt a rule to delay ...


32

Most of the Republican portion of the Senate are objecting to the second Impeachment trial as unconstitutional because it is taking place after Trump has left office. They contend that because Trump is no longer the President he cannot be tried for impeachment by the Senate. The Senate appears to have actually voted twice on this issue. Initially on Jan 26th,...


31

There are no restrictions at the federal level for running for multiple offices at once. However, at least six states have imposed restrictions on running for multiple offices concurrently: Colorado (Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-4-501) Florida (Fla. Stat. Ann. § 99.012) Illinois (Ill. Ann. Stat. § 10-7) Louisiana (La. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 453) Oregon (Or. Rev. Stat. §...


28

According to a report by Smart Politics, 15 states (plus Georgia) currently have a partisan split between the Governor and the Senators. Four states have Democratic governors and two Republican U.S. Senators: Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina Two states have Democratic governors and one U.S. Senator from each major party: Pennsylvania and ...


27

Basically, most of Trump's nominees are still awaiting to clear the respective Senate committees. As seen from The Washington Post graphic that you cited, most of the nominees are only referred to the respective Senate committee in May, which is just a month ago. Nominations must be formally submitted to the relevant Senate committee before a vote in the ...


27

Each senator is in one of three classes, and at each election all the senators in one class are elected. In the 2018 race, for example the "class 1" senators were elected. That regular elections for different classes happen at different dates is not merely a convention, it is mandated by Article one of the Constitution. In addition to the regular elections ...


27

In the 2004 senate election, Obama was pitted against Jack Ryan. In the middle of the campaign, papers were released as part of Ryan's divorce that suggested he had taken his wife to sex clubs and asked her to have sex in public. Moreover, he had lied privately to the Republican committee, saying that there was nothing potentially embarrassing in the ...


27

With Democrat control of the House such a bill would have no chance of becoming law. Yehuda points out that bills are sometimes introduced for show, even if they have no chance of becoming law, to demonstrate a party's commitment to making something happen, or so that opponents are forced to vote for or against something that can be used against them later. ...


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