Hot answers tagged

169

What point was she trying to make when she claimed Native American heritage? There's a few things to consider here Native Americans are a pretty well defined minority group, complete with an actual culture. Warren either sold herself, or heavily implied, that she was a minority, despite the fact that she was clearly not a member of that minority. She has ...


55

The trivial answer is that its a political issue because she's a politician and a public figure, so its in several parties' interest to make a big deal about it. Unfortunately, that also means its in a lot of people's interest to pretend things are much simpler than they are. I think its really important to start here with some basic facts. The main one ...


43

Politically, it is a very fruitful issue for those who wish to have the most bang for their attack-ad dollar. The fact is, she checked Native American in addition to White in some post-hire Harvard survey to determine if their staff met diversity goals. While we can only guess at her motivation, the fact that it was done post-hire suggests it was not done ...


39

Yes. Currently gerrymandering has no effect on US Senators. However, before the ratification of the 17th amendment to Constitution, Senators were elected/chosen by the state legislature. The state legislature, including its senators(at least in my state), have and have had districts. So, since gerrymandering started "officially" in 1812 and since the 17th ...


39

Yes, the Senate can hold a trial, but they would have to change their rules first in order to do so. There's no Constitutional requirement that the Articles of Impeachment be somehow "sent" to the Senate. The only parts of the US Constitution regarding impeachment are Article I, Section 2, Paragraph 5: 5: The House of Representatives shall chuse ...


38

In official proceedings of the United States Congress, members are expected to maintain a high degree of decorum. The repeated "thanks" (even though he may not mean it), and "my good friend, the Senator from ..." (even though she hates him), may not be sincere, but is done anyway out of common decency and respect for the institution. So, they're not really ...


37

The other answers indicate that Trump has appointed an unusually large number of judges, but they don't quite get to how Trump was able to nominate so many more judges than previous presidents. Vox: What Trump has done to the courts, explained One reason is that the Senate under the final two years of Obama's term was controlled by Republicans, and under ...


31

It’s for “procedural reasons to preserve his right to bring the bill up again”. This article from the Washington Post explains why former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid always seemingly vote against his own party. It's that somebody on the winning side of the cloture vote — in this case, the side voting against cloture — has to file a "motion to ...


30

A short piece on PolitiFact published at the time in 2016 put Biden's 1992 speech in its political context: Biden's floor speech was on June 25, 1992, more than three months later in the election cycle than it is now. There was no Supreme Court vacancy to fill. There was no nominee to consider. The Senate never took a vote to adopt a rule to delay ...


29

Let's get academic about it. I think the term racism is often used to address a basket of discriminatory positions. The folks over at Oxford Dictionary on Racism Prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one's own race is superior. So then we follow up with Race Each of the major ...


27

Basically, most of Trump's nominees are still awaiting to clear the respective Senate committees. As seen from The Washington Post graphic that you cited, most of the nominees are only referred to the respective Senate committee in May, which is just a month ago. Nominations must be formally submitted to the relevant Senate committee before a vote in the ...


27

Each senator is in one of three classes, and at each election all the senators in one class are elected. In the 2018 race, for example the "class 1" senators were elected. That regular elections for different classes happen at different dates is not merely a convention, it is mandated by Article one of the Constitution. In addition to the regular elections ...


27

In the 2004 senate election, Obama was pitted against Jack Ryan. In the middle of the campaign, papers were released as part of Ryan's divorce that suggested he had taken his wife to sex clubs and asked her to have sex in public. Moreover, he had lied privately to the Republican committee, saying that there was nothing potentially embarrassing in the ...


25

Because it was a compromise struck at the Constitutional Convention between the large colonies like Virginia and New York, and the smaller colonies like Connecticut and Rhode Island that all states would get an equal say in the Senate to prevent the large states from forcing their policies on the Smaller states. It was known as the Connecticut Compromise. ...


25

Yes it is unusual. Per this Vox article Trump has appointed 48 courts of appeal judges. Here is a comparison with other recent presidents at a similar point in their presidencies and their total number of appointments in parentheses: Trump: 48 Obama: 24 (55) Bush : 30 (62) Clinton: 27 (66) Bush Sr.: 31 (42) Reagan: 23 (83) ...


24

This is a common legislative tactic. Although Sen. McConnell didn't explicitly describe his plan, he was likely planning on gutting the bill (removing all of its current content) and eventually replacing it with new, immigration-related content. This isn't an amendment: it's replacing the current text of the bill with all-new text. This saves time for the ...


24

Because the current perception is that both sides see more advantages to being able to campaign on what they'd do if only the voters would hand them control of the House, Senate, and Presidency than they do in compromising and campaigning on the fact that they got something done. If no bill passes, Democrats can campaign on the need to overhaul policing and ...


23

The earliest reference I know of is 1986, when she was first listed as a minority professor [S]he acknowledged that for years before she joined the faculty at Harvard, she had been classifying herself as a minority professor in a directory of the Association of American Law Schools. That directory included Warren on a list of minority professors from 1986 ...


22

It is true that at one point you did have to talk continuously to block a vote, but it hasn't been true for ages. Skip a few paragraphs if you don't care about the history: Originally, the Senate had a way for the majority to vote to end debate on a matter, by voting that it's time to vote (yes, really) on the matter at hand. In 1806 the President of the ...


22

Yes the Senate bill can be framed as an attempt by the U.S. to influence China. Whether that is a bad thing or not depends on your own beliefs. The U.S. commonly uses trade restrictions and sanctions to attempt to bring about change in other nations that it believes are acting against the interests of the U.S.. Iran continually faces sanctions for their ...


20

While the state-wide nature of gerrymandering would make one think that it has no effect, it certainly could. Elections are run at the state level, so a state-gerrymandered election could alter that balance of power in the state legislature, which would effect things like voter-suppression measures, enactment and enforcement of campaign finance regulations, ...


20

When thinking about political power and influence it is important to distinguish between formal and informal power. While the law explicitly provides some powers, often times the most significant powers are entirely informal (not defined in law). The Vice Presidency is a position that largely relies on informal power. Who Runs the Senate? According to ...


19

Are her opponents just trying to catch her in a lie, that she falsely claimed Native American ancestry to try to garner support from that constituency? No. The claim is that she did so to get better employment opportunities, not for political reasons. Her claim was made well before she entered politics. In addition, there are very few Cherokee in ...


19

The Senate confirms the nominees (mostly, Judicial including the Supreme Court, but also cabinet and other administration positions). If the Senate is flipped, then it is significantly more difficult for nominees to be approved. (In practice it's unlikely they would be willing to approve any of Trump's nominees - Gorsuch received 3 votes from Democrats, ...


19

While the other answers address the legal issues better than I can, there’s some important context to this issue that is missing from the other answers which I’d like to discuss. As everyone knows, the Impeachment process has 2 stages: first, the House writes and votes on Articles of Impeachment, then the Senate holds a trial on them. Since the Articles of ...


19

That story is from 2 days ago before it passed and is no longer a relevant point. The issue was that 4 republican senators stalled the bill to try to weaken unemployment benefits. Sanders made a counter-threat to stall the bill if they didn't withdraw their objections, to prevent the Senate from giving in to their objections. Sanders objected to an ...


18

Any Senator can move for the Senate to go into closed session; as soon as the motion is seconded, and until a majority votes to resume public debate, the galleries are cleared, the doors are locked, and guards are posted to keep the public out. Anything said during a closed session is in the Congressional Record, but is kept under seal until such time as the ...


18

Simple Answer: The Constitution Says So The simplest answer is because the Constitution requires the Senate's approval before certain officials are hired, but doesn't mention them being fired. From Article 2, Section 2: ... and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and ...


17

The Wikipedia article answers your question. A majority of Senators (i.e., 51 of the 100) is required to obtain a quorum, and only three senators out of 100 were present when the bill was voted upon. However, the Senate (and the House) conduct their respective businesses under the presumption that a quorum is always present, unless or until a completed ...


17

The Senate Judiciary Committee is in charge of holding hearings prior to the confirmation of Supreme Court nominees. Since Republicans control the Senate, the 20-member committee would consist of 11 Republicans and 9 Democrats. This means that the Republicans hold a majority in this committee, thus they would have enough votes to grant or withhold consent ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible