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3

When the constitution talks about 'executive powers' it means the administration of federal law and policy, not the administration of all government activities. The House, Senate, Supreme Court, and other branches, institutions, and agencies of the federal government take care of their own 'in-house' administrative needs. The White House is not involved in ...


6

Indeed, following the English, and later UK Parliament, most state legislatures appoint a Sergeant-at-Arms, to keep order and provide for security for a deliberative body. Colony legislatures had appointed these prior to 1776, and almost the first act of the US congress was to appoint officers, including a Sergeant-at-Arms. The office of Sergeant-at-Arms is ...


1

The specifics of legality are more the realm of Law Stack Exchange, so I will focus on the policy concepts in play that support the South Dakota Lawmaker's stance that it is legal, these are discussed in this blog post albeit for the Federal government but the same principles apply. Revenue is an unqualified good thing for a state government. The more money ...


6

Any individual in the US — including the president — can make a citizen's arrest for certain crimes committed in their presence. That aside, the power to make an arrest is vested in certain official positions. These positions are established by federal, state, or local statute — i.e., by Congress, state legislatures, or local committees — and individuals are ...


25

I'd expect that if you asked the framers, they would say that they were pretty clear about who can suspend habeas corpus-- Congress. The only reference to habeas corpus in the Constitution is in Article 1, which establishes the legislative branch, Section 9 (Powers Denied Congress) which reads The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be ...


0

The legislative branch is in charge of deciding the rules. The executive branch is, as the name says, in charge of executing those rules. If Congress wishes to end a war, they can simply pass a bill doing so. This would be subject to the president's veto power, so if the president is determined to continue the war, Congress would need 2/3 majority in both ...


12

There's quite a lot of verbiage about POTUS war powers, but it's otherwise unclear exactly how Congress stops a war, even if is the one that has to declare it. If it was considered urgent enough that Matt's defunding solution would be too slow, Congress could impeach the President, though that would be stretching the definition of high crimes and ...


9

Congress controls funding for the military. In an extreme situation, Congress could choose to defund the military budget entirely. In practice, this will probably never happen because members of Congress have numerous incentives to keep the military funded.


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