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8

The Single Transferable Vote system was specifically designed to handle this situation. A low keep-factor on several candidates means that it was a very good decision to use the STV system for this election. In STV, the voters can usually rank as many candidates as they want. There are multiple variants of how to count votes in an STV elections, but usually ...


6

I think the fact that you never eliminate candidates could be a problem - in same cases you won't even get a result. Let's say you have 10 candidates trying for 5 slots, and 1000 votes. Each candidate gets between 50-150 votes. But 150 is less then the quota (using the Droop method, the quota would be 1000/[5+1] + 1 = 167) Nobody meets the quota - so ...


6

The biggest problem that I see with this is that it is possible to get different results in a recount. So I would never recommend it for a government election. You'd have politicians trying to game the system to get the "right" recount. One might argue that there are often random tiebreakers, but these operate at the end of the process. So everyone can ...


5

Yes. Consider the following (somewhat contrived) scenario. There are 300 voters and 5 candidates. The election uses the formula (number of votes) / (seats to fill) to determine the quota. Votes are as follows: AD - 100 BE - 100 CE - 25 CD - 15 DC - 35 EC - 25 (Where "XY - Z" means Z people voted X as their first choice and Y as their second choice) ...


4

One key feature of elections is trust in the counting method. Which makes choosing your own system a bit of an issue - not least given the flaws people are picking up on. There are bodies (such as the UK Electoral Reform Society) with >100 years experience of doing this. They publish a guide on using STV including detailed instructions on how to run a count....


4

Here is the wikipedia article on STV vote transfers in general, and here is a webpage describing the method for Ireland in particular. I don't want to post a link-only answer, but the description for Ireland is rather long, and that's just one method. In short, yes, Ireland transfers a fraction of the votes proportionally. If a country were try to do it by ...


3

It might be worth noting that parts of the UK already use preferential voting systems in local governmental elections, including STV in Scotland and Northern Ireland, and the supplementary vote (a somewhat reduced version of the alternative vote/instant runoff scheme) in mayoral elections and the (heavily ignored) elections for police commissioners. These ...


3

When a candidate gets a majority in the first round, there is no difference. It is also usually possible to determine that all but the top two candidates did not win, even if it is not possible to immediately determine which of the top two candidates did win in IRV (although it is often possible to make a very good guess about that point based on the ...


3

This is a matter for the judgement of the returning officer. The key principles are given by the electoral commission 3.20 The decision of the (Acting) Returning Officer is final, subject only to review on election petition. 3.21 Establishing voter intention is crucial when determining doubtful ballot papers. Where there is a clear intention apparent, for ...


1

As a programmer, the initial count should be available as soon as all the votes are scanned. It's really an easy thing to program, and the data is all electronic. The limiting factor isn't the voting type, it's scanning the votes into the system.


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