100

According to South Korea's National Security Chief, Chung Eui-yong, speaking to the press after a meeting about North Korea with President Trump on March 08, 2018: "I explained to President Trump that his leadership and his maximum pressure policy, together with international solidarity, brought us to this juncture. I expressed President Moon Jae-in’s ...


81

The key assumption you have made is assuming people in the US act sensibly, and that they would base their answer in the poll on facts. This assumption might not be accurate. A recent (Jan 2019) study shows that facts might not be too important in this matter [1]. Inaccurate views of scientific consensus and the willful rejection of scientific consensus. In ...


55

Simply because abandoning territorial claims will do nothing: It will neither eliminate the military threat of the "North" Korea, nor would it relax the tensions. It requires enormous amounts of legal work, including adopting amendments to the Constitution of Korea. This is why: Both governments claimed sovereignty over the whole Korea, however in a ...


54

The Chinese government has spent the last decade and more very actively pursuing the extension of their territorial waters into what is commonly accepted to be international waters, or even the territorial waters of other sovereign nations. Mostly within the South China Sea. They do this by arbitrarily claiming islands, or by creating artificial islands ...


53

Trump has definitely had some influence, perhaps by accident or perhaps by design. Because of his nature and our collective inability to understand Kim Jong Un's inner thinking, it's hard to say for certain. My opinion is that most of the credit for the historic diplomatic breakthrough probably goes to China and Xi Jinping. Kim recently travelled to China ...


31

As a German the message By now it's completely obvious that the Korean peninsula won't be reuniting any time soon. has no merit for me at all. I can assure you as contemporary witness that nobody expected a German reunification as far as 1988, two years before the final reunification. It was a big stroke of luck that Russia had no interest to aid the old ...


30

According to Chinese scientists, the last nuclear test in North Korea provoked the collapse of the mountain under which the testing base was built, basically crushing it. Kim's surprising change of policy and his statement about ending nuclear tests would then likely be due to his physical incapacity to pursue them. In case this get confirmed, one could ...


29

Yes, the general consensus is that the war ended after the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement. Both countries signed the armistice, thereby ending the war in a truce. The Korean War, which began on June 25, 1950, when the North Koreans invaded South Korea, officially ended on July 27, 1953. At 10 a.m., in Panmunjom, scarcely acknowledging each other, ...


27

Perhaps because the laws originate in military dictatorships: the South Korea government engages in active Internet censorship based on three laws: the Nation Security Law [1948], the Basic Press Act [1980], and Article 21 [of the 1987 Constitution]. Democracy or freedom of speech doesn't have deep roots in South Korea: Censorship was almost forgotten ...


20

It is the official government policy of both North Korea and South Korea to unify. This is due to the historical fact that Korea was unified before World War II. Both countries were unified for more than a thousand of years, under various names, including the Greater Korean Empire from 1897 to 1910, Joseon from 1392 to 1897 and Goryeo from 918 to 1392. Both ...


17

From what I understand the main issue is that this tips the balance in the equations of Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) in favor of the United States. The radar systems in the THAAD system would allow the U.S. to detect any missile launches in China a bit earlier than they could now, essentially meaning that China's nuclear deterrence is being undermined. ...


15

There is not much more to say than refer to you this wiki page about the Korean Unification Flag, which also happens to be the first page you would find when googling "flag korea olympic games". The flag represents the Korean peninsula in blue on a white background. You can see it held by athletes from both Koreas in Turin 2006 Winter Olympics games on a ...


12

Technically yes The law that describes this is the National Security Act. The relevant passage from the wiki states (emphasis mine): In other words, it made communism illegal; recognition of North Korea as a political entity; organizations advocating the overthrow of the government; the printing, distributing, and ownership of "anti-government" ...


12

In response to Michael_B's answer, just this past week Chrintine Ahn, founder of Women Cross DMZ, was on the podcast Citations Needed. Here's a short snippet from their conversation, which I think is a worthwhile perspective from someone who is actively involved in the peace movement in Korea. Christine Ahn: It's so amazing to me how much the media just ...


12

According to commentator Patrick Chovanec, what's going on is a complex multiparty affair in which President Trump has played a key role, but not necessarily a central one. (I posted his Twitter thread at https://twitter.com/prchovanec/status/989895930727026689 on this topic as a response to an earlier answer and was asked to post a summary of his arguments.)...


12

This isn't necessarily a full answer, but it's part of the answer that has been addressed yet and is way too long for a comment. I don't necessarily disagree with the other answers about the misperceptions held by Americans but: America is big. It's also more diverse than someone simply consuming American media might guess. The states, even in today's ...


10

The last monarch of the short lived Korean Empire (preceded by the Kingdom of Korea) abdicated under occupying Japanese pressure in 1910. Now, 107 years later, one of the key issues would be how to decide who to make the king of a reinstated constitutional monarchy. Reinstating a descendant of the last monarch of Korea's great, great grandchild or ...


9

Why doesn't South Korea give up its claim on North Korea? Let me ask a rhetorical question. Why doesn't the north give up its claims on the south? By now it's completely obvious that the Korean peninsula won't be reuniting any time soon. No it isn't. Obviously Germany split around the same time as the Koreas but still reunified. If there is any ...


9

Why does the US have military bases in friendly countries? Logistics: The US has military bases all over the world. This, in addition to things like aircraft carriers and air patrols, allows the US to respond quickly to unexpected threats. Show of friendship: Many allies of the US depend on its military, in whole or in part, for their defense. Keeping a ...


9

This probably isn't the answer, but you have to remember that there's a major information imbalance here. Local news focuses on the details of the response at the state and local level, and also includes some coverage of the national-level response. Stories are done about other countries, but they're usually just an overview and focus on multiple countries....


9

I thought my footnote to top answer (which I added while the question was closed) might be all I have to say here (i.e. that political polarization largely explains the US poll), but since a rather misleading claim about actual deaths (per day) was made in the now 2nd most upvoted answer (Hatman's), here's a graph from a March 31 BCC video to debunk that ...


8

Not only that there is no perceived need by the people of South Korea to restore its monarchy, but also there is really no one that is a good potential monarch out there. After the Japanese annexation of Korea, the Korean imperial House of Yi became members of the Japanese imperial house (House of Yamato), and the deposed Korean Emperor were accorded the ...


8

There is a similar question on this site: Why doesn't South Korea give up its claim on North Korea? The answer is the same as there: both countries have constitutionally-fixed sovereignty claims over the entire Korea, with minor differences; the first article of any peace treaty is usually a formal designation of borders and an acknowledgement of each ...


8

Disclaimer: counterfactuals are hard to answer period and I'm certainly not a professional - but I'll give a crack at it! Would South Korea want to? The starting context you need here is that Korea being split is a modern phenomenon and a historic aberration. Imagine it: the Asian peninsula was mostly left alone till the 19th century and then in a period ...


7

Pornography and (online and on-site) gambling are illegal in South Korea. The country is very conservative and it takes what it considers to be issues very seriously. For example, South Korean citizens cannot even visit casinos abroad and citizens that are guilty of gambling abroad may be prosecuted when they return to their country. The ban on pornography ...


7

The Wikipedia article you linked actually links a source which attempts to explain it a bit: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2017/01/120_221302.html It is a 6-month extension of the previous ban that was scheduled to end Jan. 31. The move was aimed at protecting South Korean people's lives and property from those countries and regions suffering ...


6

Chinese state news agency Xinhua has a microsite, titled "China urges halt of THAAD deployment in ROK", dedicated to news articles regarding its opposition to the deployment of THAAD. It's worth checking out as it explains China's opinion regarding the deployment in their own words. Basically, China's main argument is that "it will disrupt ...


6

I am a South Korean born South Korean citizen. Democracy was given to South Koreans, just one day. They didn't fight for it. No such civili uprising for freedom and equality as in France was present. Democracy came with the liberation from Imperial Japan through the winning of World War II by the United States. Befor the liberation, Korea was still a ...


6

National pride, and limited benefit of moving. There is a tradition of Seoul being the capital of Korea, dating back to the 1400s, indeed it's current name means "Capital". To move the capital (i.e. to move the government) would be a defeat. There would be limited benefits, just moving the seat of government doesn't move the people. Even if Busan had been ...


6

An armistice is a cease fire not an end to a war. From what I have read a war is not over until a peace treaty is signed. So while it may be said that the conflict is frozen, the war is not over just hostilities. So I believe that yes, the war is not over and so must still be ongoing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_Armistice_Agreement http://www....


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible