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1

As a Spaniard, and one quite into political and economical issues, Spain's political system is broken from the bone. It was created in 1978 with our Constitution after the death of Francisco Franco, and people call it a democracy although it is far from it. Why? In a representative democracy, you have to elect and vote for your local representatives AND the ...


4

You can add political instability. There have been 4 general elections in 6 years. The two main traditional parties have lost significant shares compared to the new (more or less populist) parties that have arisen in the past decade, but alliances insofar have been pretty short lived. The current government, although it's a coalition, it's a minority ...


9

Some plausible possibilities: Two significant regions of Spain (Basque Spain and Catalonia) are seeking independence and facing strong resistance for the central government. Catalan independence movement disputes precipitated a constitutional crisis in 2017. A recent pardon of nine Catalan independence leaders left neither side happy with the way the ...


-4

Actually, when you take into account that the unemployment rate in Spain in 2021 was 14.0%, nearly twice the rate for the Euro-zone at 7.6%, and, per the chart posted on this financial website is second only to South Africa, Spain's government has/is obviously suffering from fiscal irresponsibility. In America, the Federal Reserve System monitors the ...


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