33

From your CNN link: The law bans state-funded or state-sponsored travel by employees of state agencies and departments as well as members of boards, authorities, and commissions. Note the critical words. This only applies to state employees using state funds or under state sponsorship in some way. They're just setting limitations on use of their ...


9

The ban covers using state funds to travel to other states. As UCLA recently proved, all you have to do is claim the funds came from non-state funds Late last year, UCLA announced it would not schedule any athletic contests in states with anti-LGBT laws. Earlier this year the State of California went a step further, banning all state-funded or state-...


9

In the US, state and local legislatures can choose to be bicameral, unicameral or something else. As of today, all state legislatures are bicameral, except in Nebraska, which is unicameral. Most local governments are unicameral. The US Congress has no structural flexibility. It must be bicameral, as mandated by the Constitution. Why are most state ...


8

To answer the question that OP asked ("Can California ban its citizens from traveling to other states?"), which I should note is a purely hypothetical question (i.e. California has not actually attempted to do this, as explained in other answers), we can look to the Constitution. Article IV, Section 2 begins as follows: The Citizens of each State ...


7

This answer is specific to the Maryland legislative process. Bill Introduction & Committee Process The first step of the process is to have the bill introduced. In my state, it's considered poor taste to deny a bill introduction (although I can't say for sure that norm extends to other states). Maryland has some restrictions on bills based on when ...


7

Yes, many constitutional rights are limited upon conviction and imprisonment. Most notable among these is the right of liberty. The major constitutional clause is the "due process" clause of the fifth amendment that requires due process of law for limiting certain rights: ... nor shall any person ... be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without ...


6

TL;DR: In the state capitol. State senators and state representatives have nothing to do with the federal government. They are part of the state government. They can only pass state level laws. In the United States, the state governments are separate entities from the federal government. Each state has its own state constitution (although they may ...


5

There are numerous studies that look at bicameralism in public choice economics. One general conclusion is that more houses make legislation more difficult to pass, requiring a super-majority of support for legislative change. This can make Tyranny of the majority more difficult, but also lets less legislation pass in general. However, just having two houses ...


5

do any states have plans to introduce legislation which would enable a deduction similar to QBI, which was enabled by federal legislation? To the best of my knowledge, in a field I keep fairly close track of, no (although it is always hard to prove a negative and surely there must be some state legislator somewhere who has considered doing so). This said,...


5

Short Answer There was no actual policy dispute between the IDC and mainline democrats. The split occurred because of John L. Sampson causing distrust amongst a faction of democrats. Long Answer John L. Sampson has participated in several instances of bad behavior as the New York Times depicts. The examples leading up to the split are: Casino Bidding ...


5

Yes. A State Legislator is the state equivalent of a Federal Legislator such as Representative or Senator. Most states model their legislature like the federal Congress, while Nebraska and Washington D.C. do not.


4

I'm going to assume that by "State Senator" you mean people like Jeff Merkerly, who represents Oregon in the US Senate. (This is an incorrect use of terminology, but otherwise you question doesn't make sense.) A Senator will normally have multiple offices. For example Jeff Merkerly has offices in DC, Portland, Eugene, Medford, Salem, Bend and Pendleton. ...


4

The short answer is: no. Ultimately the situation resolved itself when the Democrats basically gave up, saying they didn't have the votes to pass the measure anyway now. The Republicans then returned before the proposed bill would have otherwise expired. This is not even the first time Republicans (or Democrats) have done such a quorum denying walkout in ...


4

In UK law, the government is treated like an unsecured creditor. A debt can only exist when there is a demand for payment. In the case of tax the legal basis for this demand is not the fulfilment of a contract, but the decision of the representatives of the Commons to consent to the payment of a tax: I.e. You voted for those MPs, and they voted to allow the ...


4

The constitution of each state in India is determined by the state (within some boundaries). There are some advantages to a unicameral system (simpler, cheaper, less bureaucracy) and some disadvantages (less effective scrutiny, only one system of representation). It has been a matter of the state to decide whether the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. ...


3

The linked article in the original article relies for this assertion on Steven F. Huefner, "The Neglected Value of the Legislative Privilege in State Legislatures", 45 WM. & MARY L. REV. 221, 221 (2003). This article provides a state by state summary in an appendix starting at page 308 of that volume of the law review. See also pages 235-237 summarizing ...


3

No coordination, no leadership, no talking, nor governor intervention is required. The existing channel for applications for a Constitutional Convention is the Congressional Record. The Supreme Court has already ruled on the matter of ratification timing in Coleman v. Miller, finding: A proposed amendment to te Federal Constitution is considered pending ...


3

County-based districts The same consideration does not seem to exist on the state level. While that is true now, it did not used to be true. Prior to the court case Reynolds v. Sims, it was not strange for states to base one of their chambers on counties. So each county would get a fixed number of representatives (e.g. one) much the way the federal ...


3

The first and most obvious problem is minority rule. If there are five different candidates and the results turn out like this: (A - 20%; B - 17%; C - 23%, D - 21%, E - 19%), then C would turn out to be the winner. This seems fair at first, until you notice that 77% of the voters didn't vote for candidate C, but wanted somebody else to represent them. The ...


2

The accepted answer covered the 5th amendment pretty well, so I'll focus on the 1st and 8th. First amendment rights, as far as the practice of religion, are somewhat well​ protected. Prisoners are allowed to practice the religion of their choice, religious texts are often provided and diet restrictions mostly respected. Free speech on the other hand is ...


2

It would be simpler to list the rights they lose. The most obvious rights lost by people convicted of a felony are the rights to vote, the right to bear arms, and to a degree, the right to be free of unreasonable search and seizure. On occasion, a convicted felon can petition to have some of those rights restored, but said restoration is not automatic. If ...


2

From what I do know about other states, typically, a member of a parliament can propose legislation, and while whoever has the "speaker" or "chairperson of the parliament" position, or heads committees, can slow down the progress of the bill, they cannot prevent it from moving forward if it has proponents, and if majorities vote to move it forward. ...


2

NOTE: I could not follow your link due to some firewall banning my geographic area1, and could not google any additional information on the web (there are only a few references to "Kirsten Jhonson candidate minnesota", and none seems recent enough to include the information you relate). I am basing my answer completely in your recollection. First, one link ...


2

In America, there are two countries who elect their judges via elections: United States and Bolivia. Their experiences are similar with (in my opinion) negative terms. In Bolivia, this change was lead by Evo Morales, which in the frame of the new Constitution (2009) and, considering the "refunding" of the country gave the people the power to choose ...


2

Legal case information is generally easy to come by if you poke around a bit. In this case, I just googled for the "Ventura County court" (per the article's description of where it happened), and then plugged the last name (Conti) into their search. That produced the following links: Reece Cole Smith vs Dominic Conti Reece Smith VS Lawrence Conti Gianna ...


2

There are some grey areas because there haven't ever been conventions for amendments. The first part is pretty straightforward, if two thirds of state legislatures call for a convention then Congress is responsible for setting up a place and time for the convention. From that point presumably each state could individually decide to attend and select a ...


2

Unless you're hoping to dredge up Trumpian conspiracy theories here (which he advanced wrt NH before), the simple explanation is the "first past the post system". The popular vote swing was not substantial (+4% more D votes) compared to 2016, but it did put the Democrats over the 50% "bar" on average, in 2018.


2

NCSL 50-State Searchable Bill Tracking Databases Find the most comprehensive and complete 50-state information in NCSL's searchable bill tracking databases. Select a topic listed below to find complete bill information. The status of bills listed in these databases is updated every week. Search by subtopics, year, status (e.g., pending, enacted, to governor,...


2

TL;DR: No state that has allowed the people to vote for President and Vice President has ignored the popular vote in that state. There is a slight problem with electors who ignore the outcome of the popular vote in that state. The modern practice1, which has been adopted by all 50 states and the District of Columbia, is to delegate the selection of electors ...


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