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50

"Can it happen"? Sure, the laws of the EU are set by the members of the EU, if the members want to change the rules they can. They can re-admit the UK or not. If there is a law against it, the EU can just change the law. With sufficient political will on both sides it is possible. "Will it happen"? After years of causing problems, how likely is it that the ...


49

It is a bug in the process, but it's one that has been present (and un-addressed) for more than a quarter century. When the National Emergencies Act was passed in 1976, it originally said that an emergency would be terminated if each house of Congress voted to do so. Thus a simple majority of both houses was supposed to be able to revoke the emergency. ...


26

No. But the UK can apply for membership according to Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union. This normally takes years. The article text: Any European State which respects the values referred to in Article 2 and is committed to promoting them may apply to become a member of the Union. The European Parliament and national Parliaments shall be ...


17

E.g. is it within actual powers of the government under the circumstances Absolutely not. The Civil Contingencies Act 2004 is extremely clear in defining the kind of circumstances in which its provisions can be invoked. 19. Meaning of “emergency” (1) In this Part “emergency” means— (a) an event or situation which threatens serious damage to human welfare ...


16

The President has that power because the authority to veto legislation is an enumerated power from the Constitution. The conflict exists now because the Congress has surrendered an excess amount of legislative and pecuniary authority to the Executive Branch. the National Emergency Act gives the President some narrowed powers compared to the previous ...


16

There are three types of "Emergency" in the French system. The first two are constitutional, the third is statutory law, and it was the third type that was used in 2016/17. The first can be declared when the territory, people or constitution of France are in grave danger. The President can take emergency actions to protect France. But the "Emergency" can ...


14

According to an NPR article, a secret bunker (Project Greek Island) was built in West Virginia's Greenbrier Resort in the late 1950s. It was large enough for both chambers of Congress to hold sessions, contained 1100 beds and a 6 month supply of food, and was to be used by Congress in the event of a nuclear war or some other emergency. It was exposed by the ...


13

Votes that congresspeople know won't be signed, or even pass both chambers are voted on all the time Efforts to repeal ACA. Often it's symbolic or a way for members to have their opposition to something official that they can use on campaigns. In this specific case, Congress in general feels that the President has overstepped his authority moving around ...


11

The problem with "what if" is that anything goes. If they find unobtanium under the hills of Wales which clearly would yield trillions of euro of profit every year but requires ten trillion euros to invest first which clearly requires an all European effort, you bet everyone would very, very quickly find which half of the toast is buttered. Amend the Lisbon ...


10

The Civil Contingencies Act 2004 provides, in: an event or situation which threatens serious damage to human welfare in a place in the United Kingdom, in particular, (a) loss of human life, (b) human illness or injury, [...] (h) disruption of services relating to health powers for Her Majesty via an Order in Council, or a senior ...


6

Because the expenses to provide A transport helicopter. A backup pilot for the surveillance helicopter. A backup ferry. A small boat on the lake owned by the police. A backup security official for the one who was killed. Enough phone operators to handle the call volume. A plan for compensating for the lack of these things. had been deemed ...


6

Details influence the exact outcome, but these pieces of information are relevant: The public ceremony is not required for the president elect to become the president. If January 20 falls on a Sunday, the president will be sworn in that day by taking the oath privately, but will then re-take the oath in a public ceremony the next day, on January 21. At ...


6

The short answer: there are such facilities, but where they are and what capabilities they afford is unclear. The long answer: the US Congress is not bound to any particular location, and could use any of a number of facilities that are part of the US government continuity of operations apparatus, but which exactly is not public knowledge. According to ...


5

International law generally assumes that sovereign states have relationships and treaties. That's the concept of Westphalian Sovereignty, named after the negotiations to end the 30 years' war. In recent times, various actors have pushed for limits to this sovereignty in the name of universal principles, notably the Responsibility to Protect. How these two ...


5

The short answer: It depends. It's not like declaring martial law. There's no generic "national emergency" under the National Emergencies Act and in the past national emergencies have been declared for "Prohibiting the Importation of Rough Diamonds from Sierra Leone" or "Continuing Certain Restrictions With Respect to North Korea and North Korean Nationals."...


5

The theory seems to be (IMHO) that if the President tried to do something too outrageous, he would not be able to get the support of even 1/3 of the Senate. The Legislative Branch doesn't want its power to be totally usurped. So the broad scope of the NEA doesn't really give him carte blanche, the checks and balances are still there. If most of the party ...


5

Federal The CDC, under the Health and Human Services Secretary, has some authorization to do quarantines (emphasis mine) Under section 361 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S. Code § 264), the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to take measures to prevent the entry and spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into ...


4

The general answer to this, which applies in most democratic countries, is that governments are not legally responsible for "bad" decisions, whether made during a state of emergency or not. The main reasons for this are: Who is to say what is a "bad" decision? It's rarely obvious, even with 20/20 hindsight, and the general view is that the electorate is ...


4

After reading some background material, it seems Saied's argument(s) for doing this is that the existing constitution, which was semi-presidential in nature, was not really working. Besides the political deadlock which is actually somewhat common is such systems, Tunisia had more serious problems in that regard, in that a Constitutional Court, which was ...


3

Yes; this order is a declaration of a public emergency in accordance with §7–2304 of the Code of the District of Columbia. This is the same type of declaration as was made in response to COVID-19 by Mayor Bowser in Mayor's Order 2020-045 in March 2020 that you mentioned in your question, although not a public health emergency as was declared in Mayor's Order ...


3

No, they won’t. Even if they had been wrong. Like we can see in Italy the spreading of the virus explodes if it isn’t stoped by rigorous isolation of the population like lock down, closing restaurants, factories, shops, keeping social distance. The number of beds the intensive care units is limited, the hospitals and the medical personal won’t be able to ...


3

The police in Norway did not expect a terrorist incident because such things were, and are, extremely uncommon in that country. Wikipedia lists three lethal terror attacks in recent decades. It is quite difficult to keep an organization prepared for high-impact, low-probability events that do not happen for decades. Ask yourself how your hometown would deal ...


2

The president, through executive orders, does express conclusions justifying extension of existing state(s) of emergency. But there are such emergencies still being extended that started earlier than 2001. Oldest state of emergency. A state of emergency relating to Iran, first signed in 1995 by Bill Clinton, was extended by Donald Trump on March 12, ...


2

Not to change the topic but I believe there are potential legal impacts of a majority (but not super majority) passed Joint Resolution. Specifically with respect to the appropriations the Administration would attempt to take under 10 U.S.C 2808 "Construction authority in the event of a declaration of war or national emergency" the targeted funds were first ...


2

If you are talking about the United States, the difference is the type of powers and how they are used. War Powers are defined by the War Powers Resolution of 1973. It says that the president would be allowed to send Armed Forces into action, but only under a declaration of war by Congress,"statutory authorization," or in case of "a national ...


2

These things tend to be pretty out of date given the rapidly evolving situation, but Frontex put out an EU map like that some weeks ago (March 26) By March 17 almost all US states (48) had declared some sort of emergency related to Covid-19, so a US map like that would a little superfluous unless more detailed as to what the measures were (how they differ), ...


2

ERCOT has the list, but it's in the most data-processing unfriendly format possible (a PDF table). I've only converted it as much as I needed to sum its data columns. I get a total of 32,196.93 MW max winter rating and 8,716.21 MW min winter rating from the (two) relevant order columns. Given that Texas has about 125,117 MW in total generating power ...


1

This is the text of the request that ERCOT sent to DOE: https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2021/02/f82/ERCOT%20202%28c%29%20Emergency%20Order%20Request%20-%2002.14.2021.pdf This is the DOE order: https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2021/02/f82/DOE%20202%28c%29%20Emergency%20Order%20-%20ERCOT%2002.14.2021.pdf The DOE order basically copies the ...


1

The oath of office doesn't take long to administrate and can be done quickly if needed the entire public ceremony is what takes time. If there was some sort of issue that would cause problems doing as expected they would likely do it as they moved him to a safer location.


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