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1

By looking at statistics on primary voters in 2018, as recorded by the Cooperative Congressional Election Study, we can investigate this. Rather than a tendency for mail-in voters to be more conservative ideologically, I suggest that the observed tendency to support incumbents may be due to mail-in voters identifying as stronger supporters of their party. ...


1

For the period you describe in the question, we can use the MEDSL dataset which covers recent county-level presidential election returns since 2000. There are three counties which have consistently voted for the candidate which lost the popular vote, all three within the same state - Kentucky. Bath, Carter, & Magoffin County have all voted for Bush, ...


1

Looking at the precinct-level data provided by the D.C. Board of Elections, we can find the Republican candidate vote share in the 2012 & 2016 presidential elections. With a bit of manipulation, we can obtain a few statistics about the distributions. 2012 Minimum: 0.19% (Precinct 100) 2.5th percentile: 0.35% Lower quartile: 1.26% Median: 3.36% Upper ...


-1

The purpose of a protest is two-fold: To expand awareness of and public support for a particular problematic issue To challenge the legitimacy of established institutions and undercut the authenticity of those who condone, support, or enforce those institutions Since the nature of these points implies that a significant portion of the populations is (at ...


3

Historical sociologist Charles Tilly had a well-known mnemonic for the 4 sources of power used by mass popular movements since the early modern period: WUNC. It stands for "Worthiness, Unity, Numbers and Commitment". So numbers are important, but are moderated by these other variables. A very large but spontaneous and self-interested mob which is ...


0

The 2012 results are here. Full results by precinct (there are 143 precincts) are here. The approximate breakdown by ward is shown here: The 2016 results are here. Full results by precinct (there are 143 precincts) are here. The approximate breakdown by ward is shown here: You can use this data to figure it out yourself if you are so inclined.


3

In fact, the official exit poll, as well as some post-election analyses of the state seem to indicate that - rather than Latino voters turning out to vote against Trump - he actually performed better with that demographic than Romney. FiveThirtyEight argues: In the lead-up to the election, there was a lot of talk about how Latinos would turn out in record ...


5

To examine this, I've used the CCES data from 2016. I've identified ticket-splitting voters as those who, given the option, didn't vote for a straight Democrat or Republican ticket for the offices of President, Senate, House, and other state offices. Of the 64,600 respondents to this edition of the survey, after weighting to take into account demographics, ...


8

I found one 2018 study finding that policemen who were former military veterans had fired their weapons more often than non-veteran policemen. The study does have a somewhat narrow geographical scope... https://www.themarshallproject.org/2018/10/15/police-with-military-experience-more-likely-to-shoot Researchers at the University of Texas School of Public ...


1

It's better to ask about about what strategies or rubrics people use when choosing a candidate than about a specific outcome like ticket-splitting. Ticket-splitting can be a strategy — a deliberate choice with the intention of creating a power-balance between party interests — but more often it's a result of the application of different rubrics, some of ...


3

Not a comprehensive answer but three main reasons: First, the United States has not had an established religion and competing religious sects for hundreds of years. This means that religious denominations in the U.S. have had to compete to survive with little room for anything that makes them less relevant to their members. In contrast, the vast majority of ...


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