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4

Ease of Subversion Governments throughout history have earned a tidy profit through currency debasement. In the modern era of fiat currencies this has been pushed to ludicrous levels. Depending on which numbers you go with, for example, the US Dollar has been reduced in value by as much as 98% since 1900, with the surplus cash going directly to the ...


52

The other answers discuss taxation in the UAE but omit the elephant in the room. The UAE is a collection of monarchies (that's what "United Arab Emirates" literally means). The monarchs collectively own the natural resources of the UAE, including its mineral rights and most of its land, personally (and the proceeds of past oil and gas wealth ...


20

Enforcement It's much simpler to determine whether a mining activity is occurring at all or that certain equipment exists (and can be seized) than to measure its quantity in a way that's hard to cheat. Highly taxing it would require either extensive and expensive monitoring, or accepting that it will be circumvented because the equipment and the activity ...


14

I have seen many claims that Dubai has no income tax ... This is not quite true (emboldening added). See, Taxation in the United Arab Emirates. The United Arab Emirates is a federation of seven emirates, with autonomous emirate and local governments. The United Arab Emirates does not have any federal income tax. An income tax decree has been enacted by ...


15

Dubai isn't a country but I am guessing that you are talking about the UAE. The UAE has a couple of taxes which generally tax Companies. It also uses a fee system, which means whenever you want something form the goverment you have to pay for it. Since 2018 they also have a 5% VAT tax. From the 1. Quarter 2020 revenue report: Source As you can see about 1/...


50

Taxation is already complicated enough, and complicated legal codes create unintentional consequences and loopholes. "Have a very high tax for energy consumption above a certain threshold except for designated industries" raises the question of what industries are those "designated industries". When there is a new kind of industry which ...


42

It's fundamentally a different message: "This is an economic activity that is unacceptable" vs "This is an economic activity that we want a larger cut from".


7

I will repost my answer to the very same question on money.stackexchange: Depends on your definition of "fiscally targeted", but in Slovakia, refusing compulsory vaccination(s) was an offence (priestupok – infraction or misdemeanor, whatever is the correct equivalent) and could be fined up to 331€. Source (discussing plans to remove the fine and ...


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Australia targeted the parents of unvaccinated children and teenagers by withholding tax credits if they were not immunised according to the national schedule, or on an approved catch-up plan to do so, or with an approved medical exemption. Wikipedia summarises the 'No Jab No Pay' policy quite well, including its history, arising from decreasing immunisation ...


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Yes, in Jacobson v. Massachusetts (1905) the United States Supreme Court upheld the right of the state to fiscally target unvaccinated individuals. Massachusetts had enacted the following law in relation to the smallpox vaccine: The board of health of a city or town if, in its opinion, it is necessary for the public health or safety shall require and ...


1

Forbes that explains that such a tax would be at most revenue neutral. According to the author, the UK would want also to give tax credits for losses. Then since the bookies take a slice, there will be more losses than winnings, hence more credits than taxes, and the government will lose money on the whole. . . . I am wondering if the real reason that ...


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