225

Let's appreciate the learning curve. The problem with all of those historical names is that they created sharp spikes in prejudice, social ostracism, and violence against the indicated groups, and still create issues today as seen here with COVID-19. It's true that the first identified cases of Covid-19 occurred in Wuhan China, but this does not imply that ...


104

It’s called tactical voting. From Wikipedia: In voting methods, tactical voting (or strategic voting or sophisticated voting or insincere voting) occurs, in elections with more than two candidates, when a voter supports another candidate more strongly than their sincere preference in order to prevent an undesirable outcome.


100

A new*, deliberately pejorative, term to describe an old phenomenon, that of pressuring individuals or companies through the media when you disagree with their views, often in the ethnic/sexual orientation/religious/political spheres. Admittedly, it is associated, on the right, with the increasingly strident voices that are on the left, like the great beans ...


92

I looked at your profile and saw that you're an American. You are confused by Bob because you assume that the political positions held by the Democratic Party and the Republican Party are directly analogous to what "Leftists" and "Rightists" should or do actually think. This is not the case. The parties in the United States effectively act as standing ...


81

If you want official criticism from the WHO of what Trump did/said: [Question:] Dr Tedros mentioned the importance of international unity on this and I just wondered whether anyone there at WHO had comments about the US president Donald Trump's continued usage of the term, the Chinese virus, as recently as this morning to refer to COVID given that ...


73

The easy answer is the same reason that any language has a word: it serves a useful function. English had a lot of words for rain because it rains a lot in England, and the words used differentiate between various types of rain because there is a useful distinction to make. Antisemitism gets it own word because, for historical and cultural reasons, there ...


72

North Korea is far from the only example. Wikipedia lists a couple of other countries which claim to be democratic but are not, according to 'Western' standards: Many countries that use the term "democratic republic" in their official names (such as Algeria, Congo-Kinshasa, Ethiopia, North Korea, Laos, and Nepal) are considered undemocratic "...


67

Almost every term can be appropriated to gain a positive or negative connotation. Even the term "Fascist" used to have a positive connotation once. It was derived from the Italian word "fascio", a bundle of rods. The symbolic meaning was "strength in unity". Who wants to openly admit they are anti-unity? That was before the Nazis murdered a couple million ...


63

Nationalism today is mostly associated with ethnic nationalism, which the SNP as a center-left party does not wish to be associated with. Nicola Sturgeon, the leader of the SNP, has expressed displeasure with the name because of this: Nicola Sturgeon has admitted she wishes she could change her party’s name because of the “hugely, hugely problematic” ...


61

Firstly, it's not quite correct to say that UK Government departments were traditionally named Ministries. The common use of the term Ministry to describe government departments was mostly introduced in the first half of the 20th Century. To take your examples: Ministry of Transport: established in 1919, assumed duties of the Road Board, and transport-...


57

The metaphor of a 'dog whistle' refers to literal dog whistles: whistles that produce tones too high for humans to hear, but which are perfectly audible to dogs and generally excite those dogs to bark and howl. In political usage, it means a public statement that sounds innocuous on the face of it, but which is taken as messaging by certain groups who then '...


53

Both democracy and ochlocracy are forms of government where political activism by citizens is tolerated as part of politics. The difference is that a democratic state follows its legislative, executive and legal processes and follows the rule of law, while an ochlocratic state ignores these in order to appease public sentiments. A couple tests you can use ...


52

As Andrew Grimm correctly pointed out it is tactical voting you are looking for. However, I would avoid harsh terms such as dishonest since Wikipedia also mentioned that: It has been shown by the Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem that any single-winner ranked voting method which is not dictatorial must be susceptible to tactical voting More details are ...


52

Max Rissuto from DFRLab has analysed this in an article published on March 17th which tests the media bias claims made by Republican politicians including GOP House Leader Kevin McCarthy, who tweeted that "Democrats are trying to score political points by calling Republicans racist" and that the "media called it 'Chinese coronavirus' for weeks". While ...


51

All modern democracies are representative; it's for purely pragmatic reasons hard to see how a large community could govern itself directly by the people without introducing representative intermediaries. The really interesting question for me is whether the United States, though formally a democratic republic, are factually ruled by a relatively small ...


50

Just because a country calls itself something doesn't mean it's true. Point of fact, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is said to have four false statements in its name: It's not democratic, as nobody gets to vote on anything; (EDIT: As CGCampbell points out, everyone does get to vote; it's just that there's only ever one candidate on the ballot and ...


49

From a very abstract point of view, the difference is that totalitarianism desires to completely (totally) influence the thoughts and actions of its citizens, even into the private sphere, while authoritarianism is primarily concerned with keeping public life ‘in order’ and will allow for private affairs to remain private decisions. Examples (albeit ...


48

Cancel culture is a term reflecting two things, not just one: Cancelling - an outcome related to extreme disapproval of people and organisations perceived to have acted so egregiously, that they deserve removal from public dialogue and removal of privileged statuses (de-platforming), removing of things that support them and present them as respectable/role ...


47

This is actually a surprisingly complicated question to answer, or at least to give specifics for. Briefly, a "shire" is a unit of land division, very similar to "county", the first being Anglo-Saxon, the second Norman. As such, many modern British ceremonial/historic counties have the form city name + shire, for example Nottinghamshire. In 1888 local ...


47

"Disproportionate representation" describes the result without making any reference to the cause. For example, States have disproportionate representation in the Senate is a perfectly reasonable description. If you want to be more specific as to what kind of proportionality you're talking about, you could specify with States have disproportionate ...


46

Great Britain is used to formally refer to the UK (including Northern Ireland) in a number of international associations. For example: The Olympics (TeamGB), The UK's NATO country code is GBR, ISO 3166 uses GB for the UK. The term might not be technically correct, but its use to refer to the UK is certainly not limited to US politicians.


46

This all resolves if you realise that the term sought is: liberalism! The linked Wiki page makes no mention of liberalism being a leftist thing. liberalism (n.) "liberal principles," especially the political principles of a liberal party, 1819, from liberal (adj.) in the political sense + -ism. and liberalism The quality of being liberal. ...


46

First let me say that I disagree with the notion that there is no clear definition of the term 'fascism'. Fascism is ethnocultural-nationalism, in Orwell's sense of the term 'nationalism'; that may take some unpacking, but it isn't particularly vague. The problem with reaching agreement on a proper definition of 'fascism' is two-fold: The term 'fascism' is ...


46

The term 'Czar' is used frequently, since the turn of 20th Century, by members of both parties, and in nations other than the United States. It's an informal term meant to describe a person who has been invested with broad authority over a single area of policy. The term itself predates Russo-slavic uses and arises from the Latin, "Caesar," a ...


44

This is entirely dependent on the speaker. But in general senior politicians who have passed legislation are happy to call it Bipartisan on the basis on a single vote. Nancy Pelosi claimed to have 275 Bipartisan bills that had passed the house prior to 2019, but been ignored by the Republican controlled senate. FactCheck.org looked into this claim and found ...


42

Sovereignty means the right to self-rule. Independence means the right to sole rule. A state can have sovereignty within its borders but still be part of a larger union: e.g., the states of the USA, or the nations of the EU. The quote means that Belarus declared self-rule first, and then formally left the USSR a year later.


40

The phrase "politically homeless" has been used a lot in the UK lately for this kind of situation, since almost nobody is entirely happy with how either party has handled Brexit, and there are people arguing for it from left and right.


36

White privilege is an academic concept that has recently been brought into the mainstream discourse by social media campaigns and movements like Black Lives Matter. It's basically a theory that white people in western countries have more societal privileges than people of other ethnicities who come from the same political, social and economic class. It's ...


36

It is when two members from opposite parties agree not to vote when the other is absent. pairing is an informal arrangement between the government and opposition parties whereby a member of a Legislative body agrees or is designated by the party whip to be absent from the chamber or abstain from voting while a member of the other party needs to be absent ...


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