96

A new*, deliberately pejorative, term to describe an old phenomenon, that of pressuring individuals or companies through the media when you disagree with their views, often in the ethnic/sexual orientation/religious/political spheres. Admittedly, it is associated, on the right, with the increasingly strident voices that are on the left, like the great beans ...


71

North Korea is far from the only example. Wikipedia lists a couple of other countries which claim to be democratic but are not, according to 'Western' standards: Many countries that use the term "democratic republic" in their official names (such as Algeria, Congo-Kinshasa, Ethiopia, North Korea, Laos, and Nepal) are considered undemocratic "...


57

The metaphor of a 'dog whistle' refers to literal dog whistles: whistles that produce tones too high for humans to hear, but which are perfectly audible to dogs and generally excite those dogs to bark and howl. In political usage, it means a public statement that sounds innocuous on the face of it, but which is taken as messaging by certain groups who then '...


48

Just because a country calls itself something doesn't mean it's true. Point of fact, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is said to have four false statements in its name: It's not democratic, as nobody gets to vote on anything; (EDIT: As CGCampbell points out, everyone does get to vote; it's just that there's only ever one candidate on the ballot and ...


48

Cancel culture is a term reflecting two things, not just one: Cancelling - an outcome related to extreme disapproval of people and organisations perceived to have acted so egregiously, that they deserve removal from public dialogue and removal of privileged statuses (de-platforming), removing of things that support them and present them as respectable/role ...


46

First let me say that I disagree with the notion that there is no clear definition of the term 'fascism'. Fascism is ethnocultural-nationalism, in Orwell's sense of the term 'nationalism'; that may take some unpacking, but it isn't particularly vague. The problem with reaching agreement on a proper definition of 'fascism' is two-fold: The term 'fascism' is ...


42

Sovereignty means the right to self-rule. Independence means the right to sole rule. A state can have sovereignty within its borders but still be part of a larger union: e.g., the states of the USA, or the nations of the EU. The quote means that Belarus declared self-rule first, and then formally left the USSR a year later.


41

This is entirely dependent on the speaker. But in general senior politicians who have passed legislation are happy to call it Bipartisan on the basis on a single vote. Nancy Pelosi claimed to have 275 Bipartisan bills that had passed the house prior to 2019, but been ignored by the Republican controlled senate. FactCheck.org looked into this claim and found ...


35

I think the closest general phrase would be "obstructionist candidate", which a comment already suggested. Not all nimbyist candidates are obstructionist. A candidate for a municipal council that writes zoning or development regulations could run on the basis of intending to modify the regulations or ordinances to reduce or prohibit development. ...


33

What a strange word "Liberal" is... Almost every country has a party that claims to be "Liberal", yet hardly any two "liberal" parties share the same policies. The origins of American Liberalism lie in the attempts of the Democratic party to make itself electable again at the start of the 20th century, after being out of the ...


28

The term 'democratic' comes from the Greek roots dēmos (people, populace) and kratia (power, rule). It implies a system in which political power is ultimately vested in the citizenry as a whole. Many deeply authoritarian regimes call themselves 'democratic' on the grounds that: They assert authoritarian control in the name of the citizens, or... They define ...


25

Sovereignty Sovereignty is a slippery term that has evolved over the centuries. The modern meaning traces back to the end of the Thirty Years War and the Peace of Westphalia known as Westphalian sovereignty, although even this is disputed. The supreme, absolute, and uncontrollable power by which an independent state is governed and from which all specific ...


24

Because the two independents voted with the democrats for leadership of the senate resulting in a tie vote that was broken by the vice president. https://www.khou.com/article/news/verify/verify-majority-leader-split-senate/526-d1c0c02b-5b19-4863-86da-f942d1994683


24

Glossary Term | Floor Leaders floor leaders - The majority leader and minority leader are elected by their respective party conferences to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for their parties and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. By custom, the presiding officer gives the floor leaders priority in obtaining ...


24

What you're describing is essentially a reverse poison pill. The poison pill, or wrecking amendment, is an amendment whose purpose is to make the passage of a bill completely intolerable to the side that supports the bill, or to completely de-fang a bill by, for example, removing any enforcement power. The term for an amendment that is unrelated to the bill ...


22

The term "dog whistle" in politics is not clearly defined, so pretty much any interpretation is "arguable". According to the Wikipedia article, the term originated in political polling, where researchers found that minor changes in wording could create large changes in response, because respondents were hearing something in the question ...


22

The term 'liberal', in its simplest sense, refers to any philosophical perspective that advances the rights and liberties of the individual, particularly in opposition to established systemic sociopolitical forces that oppress, expropriate, or otherwise reject or undercut such rights and liberties. The original (16th century) liberal philosophies focused ...


21

Cancel culture is when a group uses social media to convey outrage to a company/person in an attempt to remove a product they are offering, to get one of their employees fired or to stop a commercial/campaign they are running. It is often done with political motives, but sometimes also religious motives. The "culture" comes from the point that it ...


20

It wasn't a dog whistle, it was merely a flubbed attempt to say 'stand down' as Chris Wallace was attempting to get him to say. In interviews following the debate, Trump said, I don't know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down and let law enforcement do their work. So not only did he later correct himself and request that the Proud Boys ...


20

No. I can see why one might think so, since Hard Power is often defined as using "military or economic means to influence/coerce an entity," but there are two other important elements to hard power: it must be a formal power, that is to say it must be codified in law somehow; and it must be a positive power - it must be an action taken. Economic ...


19

If you are interested in coining a neologism, then I suggest *rhothiocracy. From the Greek ῥόθιος (rhothios) meaning noisy, roaring and the usual -cracy suffix from κρατεῖν (kratein), meaning to rule. Hence a situation where power is held by those who are noisy and kick up a fuss (although they could be in a minority or in the majority). EDIT: A classicist ...


19

This is a (fairly) complicated discussion and authors are likely to somewhat disagree with the conclusion. There are indeed "lumpists" who declare Putin's regime fascist after a look mostly at similarities (as the question here does). However (besides the rhetorical aspect with which "fascism" is used today to label almost anything) there ...


18

*Sorry if I ramble; going through groggy pneumonia right now... While I have the vague idea on what it is about, I am confused on its implication in the social and political arena. Historically, activists from all sides of the political spectrum have targeted individuals or groups for the positions or opinions they have held. This generally consisted of ...


18

Well, the Bombay Presidency draws its 2nd half of the name from the fact that provinces of India were at one point called "presidencies" under (early) East India Company rule. During the period of Company rule in India, 1757–1858, the [East India] Company gradually acquired sovereignty over large parts of India, now called "Presidencies"....


16

Probably the best fit is 'demagogy'. Demagogues always claim to speak for the people as a whole — that's how the term was ostensibly used in ancient Greece — but in reality demagogues aim to inflame the passions of an intemperate minority and use them as a stepping stone for broad power.


16

If the candidate planned to do nothing on being elected they could be described as an abstentionist candidate. From Wikipedia page on Abstentionism: Abstentionism is standing for election to a deliberative assembly while refusing to take up any seats won or otherwise participate in the assembly's business. In Northern Ireland, Sinn Féin, the largest ...


15

Any political move which is widely supported by the majority of both parties, is considered a bipartisan act. The simple definition to the term "bipartisan" is "of 2 parties", that's all. The common use of this term, is when the issue is supported by the 2 "Parties", not even referring to individual persons of the party (see ...


15

The central characteristic of cancel culture is that it substitutes accusations and outrage on social media for investigation and discussion of facts, with the explicit goal of social punishment of the target for the alleged offense. It's typically limited to asking to terminate someone's employment, or cancel an event - calls for violent or otherwise ...


12

Thanks to social media, powerful people and people from privileged groups have suffered negative consequences for their actions and sometimes opinions. That is unusual and a neologism have been coined to describe what they have been subjected to; cancel culture. For most people, it was never safe to voice political views. In the 1950s in the US, McCarthyism ...


11

In layman's terms, it's simply a "Big Fat Lie". Some would call it "marketing". Since there are no "down votes" that restrain countries when it comes to naming themselves, they can choose not to call themselves the "Oppressive Hell Hole that You Really Don't Want to Visit", and instead choose something like "...


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