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1

Short answer: In your East European terms, the US liberals or "left" are social liberals but economically nearest to being socialist, libertarians (a comparably irrelevant political minority) are economic liberals, and conservatives or the "right" are closer to being economic liberals (but like to exaggerate how socialist US "...


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As of this writing, we have plenty of answers that give you extended treatises on the history of philosophical Liberalism, but nothing that actually tells you what you actually asked--what the word means in US political discourse. The answer is it is completely dependent on who is using the term. In right-wing discourse (the kind you're likely to see on ...


7

The US is pretty much dominated by the 2 mostly cohesive parties, which wipes out the subtleties you may be accustomed to. In any national election you can vote for the Democrat, who will mostly vote with with Democrats on the Democratic party's platform, or the Republican, who will do likewise. We don't form coalitions and tend to have winner-take-all. As ...


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Closely related, the nearest approximate translation of "economic liberal" into US terminology is "libertarian". This grouping tends to emphasize minimal-government and deregulation as the first-class priniple, and they consider much currently-existing federal government activity an infringement of individual liberty. In practice, they ...


22

The term 'liberal', in its simplest sense, refers to any philosophical perspective that advances the rights and liberties of the individual, particularly in opposition to established systemic sociopolitical forces that oppress, expropriate, or otherwise reject or undercut such rights and liberties. The original (16th century) liberal philosophies focused ...


4

The Latin root word of "liberal" is liber, or "free", the term can attached to any given object that some person, party or sect wishes to be free from. The term also connotes bestowing, which can apply to the increase of any objects or projects that some person, party or sect believes are sound national investments. In the US the two ...


33

What a strange word "Liberal" is... Almost every country has a party that claims to be "Liberal", yet hardly any two "liberal" parties share the same policies. The origins of American Liberalism lie in the attempts of the Democratic party to make itself electable again at the start of the 20th century, after being out of the ...


24

What you're describing is essentially a reverse poison pill. The poison pill, or wrecking amendment, is an amendment whose purpose is to make the passage of a bill completely intolerable to the side that supports the bill, or to completely de-fang a bill by, for example, removing any enforcement power. The term for an amendment that is unrelated to the bill ...


4

No, it is not unique; Social Security has similar provisions The new tax is also tied to a new benefit, in the form of "long term care benefits" provided by the state of Washington. The opt-out is for people who are choosing not to participate in this program. Social Security provided by the US federal government is also funded by special taxes, ...


3

The answer is no, because your votes aren't the main factor. This is basically just a modern version of Jim Crow literacy tests though this has a lot more potential for abuse. Those who are in power could just change the outcome of the tests, so that an outcome they wanted occurs. The only useful application for a system like this is when you want to have ...


1

Well I think that this enlightened public is neither a form of democracy nor epistocracy or technocracy. It definitely lies on the fundamentals of democracy being as there are votes, and everyone can vote. It must be said that there are several differences to a representative democracy. To know what they are it is important to know what most representative ...


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This proposed system is neither truly a democracy nor an epistocracy. Instead, it is a kind of technocracy, as all decisions are ultimately taken by applying a scientific algorithm to a complex dataset about the demographic distribution of choices. Usually, technocratic approaches attempt to find some objectively "optimal" solution (according to ...


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Technically speaking, epistocracy can be a form of democracy. Democracy merely means that political power is vested in the citizenry as a whole, not in some small elite group or individual leader. Epistocracy usually means that power is vested in the intelligent (intelligence has various defenitions in this case). The enlightenend public is both a form of ...


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