New answers tagged

8

Have look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-Aligned_Movement. Non-alignment was a Cold War thing, mostly, while neutrality is a very very old concept, with countries refusing to either take sides in particular conflicts or staying apart as a basic principle of their nationhood (Switzerland for example). And unlike Non-alignment neutrality does not imply ...


2

Neutrality feels more like a 19th century concept to me. You had the Concert of Europe, also known as concert of Vienna, with multiple great and not so great powers involved in the Great Game. And a few small to medium powers who said that they would not play, and got away with it. The neutrality of Belgium was the outcome of complex negotiations. A ...


1

In the 1980s when Ronald Reagan was president, the U.S. was friendly with non-democratic countries like South Korea. Jeane Kirkpatrick (the ambassador to the U.N.) justified this by saying those countries were authoritarian, whereas the communist countries were totalitarian. (The counter-argument was that any dictatorship could simply call itself anti-...


1

Totalitarianism is different from authoritarian in that it is specifically a type of authoritarianism where there is "[a] single power holder, usually an individual dictator". Totalitarianism usually gives absolute power to one individual or group with no alternative to remove the powers-that-be other than revolution. Totalitarianism also prevents ...


-2

"Privilege" is one of those terms that has a rather nebulous meaning that to a large extent means whatever someone wants it to mean. You can find definitions of the term, but actual usage is not entirely consistent with those definitions. Some meanings of "privilege": -It refers to forms of oppression that minorities do have -It refers to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included