54

The general philosophy of post-WWII international order is that the inhabitants of a territory are entitled to self-determination. While there are still many political and historical obstacles to the general application of this principle, it is clear that any kind of military conquest contradicts this principle: it is simply not morally acceptable anymore to ...


53

No, dropping the ROC name makes the situation worse as the PRC claims that China is indivisible and that the island of Taiwan is part of China. Hence, the usual threat is that they will launch an invasion immediately if Taiwan claims independence. By sticking to the ROC name, both sides can pretend they are working towards reconciliation and reunification.


40

In theory there could be a secular, multi-ethnic, multi-religious state. In practice that is all but impossible. After the Holocaust, many Jews vowed to live in their own state defended by their own army. I find that desire understandable. Two millenia ago, the Jews were scattered by the Romans from their ancient homelands. People who lived there since ...


30

Why hasn't a country named Palestine been created yet? As you alluded to in your summary, the nation of Israel was formed during WWII and it included land claimed by the Palestinians. Israel became recognized by the global community, where as Palestine did not. Since then Palestinians have been trying through various means to create a nation. This has of ...


25

Let's begin by repeating the definitions of de facto and de jure: de facto: a) in fact, whether by right or not. b) existing or holding a specified position in fact but not necessarily by legal right. de jure: a) according to rightful entitlement or claim; by right. b) existing or holding a specified position by legal right. De jure the state of Palestine ...


20

This is hardly "coming out of nowhere"! There have been ongoing disputes between China and India since 1948, (and probably since 1948 BC!) There are several claim lines between China and India, and a vaguely defined "Line of Actual Control" (which as the name suggests can move as each side controls different sections of land.) The region is mountainous and ...


20

It seems the Stimson doctrine was interpreted more general than you interpret it. The phrasing there just says 'result of aggression', and Israel clearly used aggression (as in military force) during this war (as did the opposing countries). It might be considered a just war, so Israel is allowed to defend itself. But they still can't conquer new territories....


19

Israel gained control of East Jerusalem and the West Bank during the six day war of 1967. This is why they achieved de facto control of Jerusalem. However, since WWII, conquest has largely come into disfavor among the international community as a form of territorial acquisition and establishment of political authority. If we follow the idea of de facto ...


18

Interestingly, the name that China and Taiwan compromised on, for the Olympics at least, is "Chinese Taipei". In that context, China rejected the Republic of China (henceforth ROC) name, which Taiwan wanted to keep on using. I don't know if that mini-settlement on the Olympic name for Taiwan has any implications for the naming of Taiwan in other contexts. ...


18

International law largely forbids wars of conquest or unilateral secessions. There is a lot of fudging and hypocrisy in this but no matter where you stand, you will find some territories effectively controlled by a state (or their proxy) in a way that is disapproved by other states. The invasion of Kuwait by Iraq, Kosovo, Abkhazia, South Ossetia, or Crimea ...


17

Since the end of WW2 and the start of decolonization the international community has been quite reluctant on 2 directly related items: Occupation of other countries' territories, i.e. colonization. For example, the fact that the UK is still sitting on Diego Garcia is more might than right. Redrawing of borders. That includes cases where the borders, ...


15

It is not about physical realities, but about political questions. In the frame of a possible two-state solution, the west of Jerusalem should be the capital of Israel and the east of Jerusalem should be the capital of Palestine. Recognizing the complete Jerusalem as the capital of Israel sends the political message that the two-state solution is seen as ...


14

You have to understand what Zionism is about. It is about creating and maintaining a Jewish state. According to Zionism, that requires Jews to be the dominant ethnic group. Most Israeli Jews are Zionists and reject the idea of a binational state because Jewish dominance over it cannot be ensured. The sentiment is well described in this essay by Daniel Gordis,...


13

From the Pacific Council on International Policy: Since assuming power in 2012, President Xi Jinping has clearly articulated his vision of the “Chinese dream” which seeks to achieve the “great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation.” Xi has vowed to “restore” China’s historical influence and status by transforming China into a moderately prosperous state by ...


11

No, the real reason of the animosity from the People's Republic of China towards Taiwan does not involve the name or really even the practical consequences of an independent Taiwan. The real reason depends on the idea of One China. During the Civil War, and in practice up until 1972 both the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China claimed to be ...


11

What reason would a country have for keeping these disputes open? While I agree with Denis de Bernardy's reason for the origin of the conflict, I would think of it the other way around... what reason would a country have for closing these disputes? If the leadership of some country came to renounce some claim: it would amount to recognizing that the ...


11

The assumption that the EU is not doing anything about the occupation of one of its member states is incorrect. The EU's support of its member state is primarily in the diplomatic sphere, including supporting a wider economic embargo. European Union law pertains in Cyprus on the basis of Cyprus's sovereign decision to join the EU, so EU law pertains where ...


11

This is more of a postscript to Erwan's answer (which I believe is the most pertinent point). As well as moral acceptability, there is the question of practicality. Prior to WWII most countries had enough to worry about trying to feed themselves and develop. Two things happened following WWII that allowed the international community to promote stability (...


9

The State of Palestine has always existed, at least on paper. 136 UN member states (including two Security Council permanent members, Russia and China) and the Holy See recognize the State of Palestine, and among them many have established diplomatic relations with it. It is also a non-member observer state of the UN. A government that effectively control ...


9

I suspect that polling in the Palestinian territories is somewhat iffy to conduct, but what there is shows that there's little support for a (democratic) one-state solution among either of the populations involved. As what the solutions should be, opinions differ based on political & religious affiliations to some extent, but the "one democratic state" ...


8

Why hasn't a country named Palestine been created yet? Because Israel (backed by the United States) is against it. Almost every other country is ready to recognize Palestine. However, a UN veto by one of the Security Council's five permanent members, which includes the United States, is sufficient to block UN membership. Israel is against it because ...


7

Probably because The de facto border carved in 1949 worked to India’s territorial and political advantage. The [1949] ceasefire line left the Indians with the bulk of Jammu and Kashmir’s territory (139,000 of 223,000 square kilometres, approximately 63 per cent) and population. The Indians had gained the prize piece of real estate, the Kashmir Valley, and ...


7

I guess you are not talking in hypotheticals here, right? Is this about Israel? All international law is either customary or being agreed by the nations, and nations get to agree what counts as customary international law. So a sufficient number of sufficiently significant nations agreeing to the annexation would do it. There used to be the concept in ...


6

No, it is not only about symbol politics. The strategic location of Taiwan is too important for China to give it up. Taiwan forms the most critical link of the First island chain, a series of islands that could be used to keep the PLA Navy out of the Pacific ocean. Additions: As @RonJohn commented: The barrier also works in the other direction, it would a ...


6

There is a simple question and also a more complex question. The simple question is why most states are not willing to accept the 'right of conquest' in the case of Israel. The more complex question is why the West Bank is not legally considered now as part of Israel. I will try to answer part of the complex question, since parts of it cannot be overlooked ...


6

There are 3+1 likely reasons China wants to mess around in the area: There is a possibility of oil offshore. Brunei is vaguely in the neighborhood and struck gold in the past. That would have been a traditional reason. With the possibility of peak oil approaching, it's going to lessen. It protects sea trade lanes, which are important to China, just as ...


5

It likely would have been, but in the present tense, it would not. First, a couple of historical notes, Taiwan is considered part of 'Historical China' only under a very recent view of Chinese history. Until very near the end of the Qing, when the island was initially handed over to Japan, it was considered a backwater, and largely left to govern itself. ...


5

Israel can not accept a bi-national or a single democratic country including Palestinians for the following pragmatic reasons A .Demography Currently Palestinians population is estimated to be 13 million, among which 5 million estimated to be refugees. current Israel population is 8.7 million with 21% among them Arab Israelis (Palestinians who were giving ...


5

Which place is claimed by the most countries? Antarctica with seven. Seven sovereign states have made territorial claims in Antarctica, which are Argentina, Australia, Chile, France, New Zealand, Norway and the United Kingdom. There are three Overlapping claims, Argentina and United Kingdom Argentina, Chile, and United Kingdom Chile and United Kingdom ...


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