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88

There is no single definition of terrorism that everyone agrees to. However, Involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that violate [... the] law; Appear to be intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; ... Is used in the USA. (Title 18, section 2331) So was it violent? Yes. Was it criminal? Yes, I don't see any ...


31

As a general rule, when I use the word terrorism, I mean it to involve a small group using terror to attack the general population. Under that kind of definition, it includes the Irish Republican Army and Daesh but excludes the Nazis in Germany or Sherman's March to the Sea. Here, we seem to have an official government (China's) using clandestine force ...


15

I think your first premise is wrong; here are some counter-examples. The recent attack on a Mosque in New Zealand is being widely referred to as a Terror Attack. The murder of worshippers outside a Mosque in the UK was quickly associated with a 'Right wing terrorist' and now referred to as a Terror Attack. Anders Breivik was convicted of terrorism. When ...


8

The problem with narratives is that they mix facts with subjective interpretations, usually with a political motive. This question is ambiguous because it embraces a narrative (unequal treatment of Muslim vs non-Muslim terrorism), itself based on another narrative (Islam is a threat and leads to violence). Both these narratives offer a very distorted view ...


8

Germany considers the PKK to be a terrorist organization. This goes back to some violence in 1993. At the same time, some Kurdish activists are organized in the "Democratic Kurdish Civic Center Germany," which is officially not part of the PKK. Their rallies must not show PKK insignia, since the PKK is banned as terrorists, or their activists may be ...


7

The first thing to note given your question, in which you cite the number of deaths from terror attacks as well as the number of terrorist attacks by Jihadists, is that each of these years 2015 and 2016 had a single event that accounted for the majority of your cited deaths in Europe for each year. The November 15 Paris Attack in 2015 and the Nice Truck ...


7

I largely disagree with your premise. Communism, to some degree fascism and in particular Nazism are ideologies that are on the agenda very frequently and in people's minds all the time in Europe. Nazi atrocities and the communist iron wall are taught in schools from a young age, and communism is in very recent memory of the entire Eastern Europe. Try to do ...


7

It's a bit too soon to be 100% sure on the details, but it looks closer to what we'd call mob / mafia violence. The perpetrators wearing white shirts were working for the triads, similar to the Mafia in the USA, or the Yakuza in Japan. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triad_(organized_crime) “I have strong reason to believe they were gangsters,” said ...


6

Pretty all definitions of terrorism I'm familiar with define terrorism as the action of the group taken against the government or the population on their own, or financed by foreign agents. Any actions initiated by the government, against own population, can be speculated to be legal measures to bring peace and prosperity, or oppressive actions, but no way ...


5

These terrorists typically believe that their actions will cause other people to rally to their cause, eventually resulting in the downfall of whatever group or system they believe is the problem. This is partly why they often create manifestos. The Oklahoma City bomber was motivated by anti-government ideology. He seemed to believe that his actions would ...


5

Based on the transcript here, it looks like it's referring to: ... On another note, I've been handed a credible report of a small terrorist enclave in Northeastern Iraq. If we're going to invade we suggest taking it out before. ... That classified document described a terrorist named Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi who had started as a drug dealer ...


5

I think the hypothesis is mostly correct (but firearms aren't all that negligible in comparison), as far as actual incidents go. I found a 2007 RAND paper which uses a random sample of terrorist attacks, admittedly from a database that is skewed toward more recent attacks (in terms of volume): More sophisticated explosive-based weapons (notably RPGs, ...


5

When some Muslims are the actors of a terror attack, the attacker's religion comes into play and hence they are taken as hostages as a whole irrespective of their nationality/race/color/community, and so on. You should Google "white privilege". In short, minorities are responsabilized of the acts of any of its members, acts by members of the majority have ...


3

Taking the example of the UK (because I knew where the PDF of "proscribed terrorist organisations" lives), under the current legislative framework, if the government of the day wishes to make membership or support of an organisation illegal, then it must be described as "terrorist", there being no option for related terms such as "insurgency", "freedom ...


3

One way to understand the Christian Europe is to look at all the cultural divides: North–South, East–West, Catholic–Protestant–Orthodox, Germanic–Romance–Slavic, and so on. A large part of European history can be summarized as Christian Europeans killing other Christian Europeans across one or more of these divides. The one thing all these groups have in ...


3

According to Gen. Keith Alexander, the information collected by the PRISM program has been a part stopping "over 50" terrorist plots as of 2013. During a House Intelligence Committee hearing, the ex-NSA director called out three specific cases where PRISM played a role: the case of Najibullah Zazi and Adis Medunjanin, Khalid Ouazzani, and David Headley. ...


3

The law in question is the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Act 2019, which amongst a number of other things made changes to the Terrorism Act 2000 bringing into force a criminal offence for travelling to or failing to leave particular areas of the world. The pertinent parts of the Terrorism Act 200 are: Entering or remaining in designated areas ...


2

When did modern Middle-Eastern terrorism start? The question is flawed because there is no universal agreement on the definition of terrorism, let alone of "modern Middle-Eastern terrorism". Let's assume that by "modern Middle-Eastern terrorism" OP means terrorism acts committed in the name of religion (as opposed to politically motivated terrorism) by ...


2

The origin of this narrative is likely Islamophobia. I can't find direct evidence that this disparity does exist. I consider it quite likely, however, as it's easy enough to find other disparities in the depiction of Muslims and non-Muslims in connection with terrorism. For instance, a study found that attacks by Muslim perpetrations received several times ...


2

Whilst others have addressed some of the many problems with the premise, to which I will add a further point below, I'm going to point out the reasons why people may think so, which is the claimed question: Any group is likely to notice more when it's on the receiving end of criticism. This is likely to make it more noticeable when you are criticized than ...


2

Your question begins with incorrect assumptions. The Taliban does not bomb people randomly. They target places and things that are linked with the US occupation. This includes the central government set up with the help of the US, which they consider to be an American puppet. This is all part of normal guerilla warfare.


2

The Taliban mostly bomb big cities they argue that the people in big cities are silence about the West invasion, and they deserve to be killed. For example Kabul, the capital gets bombed now almost daily. The second reason is the Taliban don't want to win the hearth and mind of people they want to rule by fear and force which thy did when they were in power.


2

Whilst I feel people have addressed the definition of terrorist quite well, it might pay to approach it from the other angle: what constitutes a gangster? Cambridge Online Dictionary suggests: a member of an organized group of violent criminals https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/gangster However, a gangster is, more simply put, a member ...


2

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/schengen-information-system_en The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the most widely used and largest information sharing system for security and border management in Europe. SIS enables competent national authorities, such as the police and border guards, to enter and consult ...


2

Are there any instances of the PKK targeting civilians during the insurgency of 2015-present? Mostly no, not by themselves. On the other hand, there's a big debate whether the newly sprung TAK (Kurdistan Freedom Falcons), which has engaged in bombing of civilians in Turkey at large, is really unconnected to the PKK. The PKK says so, but (e.g.) the Obama ...


2

I'm not convinced this is a comprehensive answer, but CAIN has an article about this topic, which does mention one more "ancient" 1937-1938 campaign against customs "huts": "Blowing up customs huts had always been a favourite I.R.A. tactic and a number had gone up in 1937 in protest against a visit by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth." (Coogan, 1987 ...


2

The US State Department actually keeps a list, although to make the list an organization has to not only be terrorist in nature, but has to threaten US citizens or interests (so theoretically, WWII partisans in enemy occupied territory would not make this list). As far as Kurdish groups go, it looks like the PKK (based in Turkey) is on the list, as is AQKB (...


1

There are many such databases. Another answer mentions the Schengen Information System, but countries outside the EU and the Schengen area cannot participate. This includes the US, of course, which you mentioned in your question. Some countries share such information bilaterally. For example, Canadian border officers have access to the United States' ...


1

Terrorism is amazingly ineffective at achieving its stated goals, especially compared to just about any other alternative. The linked paper suggests that terrorism is about social identity, or more colloquially: "Perhaps the real Jihad/Aryan Race/Revolution was the friends we made along the way." If terrorism is more about belonging than achieving its ...


1

Why is the Ottoman Empire mostly seen in a negative light in the non-muslim world? I will concentrate on this question and avoid any comparisons with Fascism or Communism. Conquest: No foreign conquering power is perceived favorably. Conquest is bloody. The Ottoman Empire didn't expand because other countries wanted to join, through marriages or purchases ...


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