87

There is no single definition of terrorism that everyone agrees to. However, Involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that violate [... the] law; Appear to be intended (i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population; ... Is used in the USA. (Title 18, section 2331) So was it violent? Yes. Was it criminal? Yes, I don't see any ...


31

As a general rule, when I use the word terrorism, I mean it to involve a small group using terror to attack the general population. Under that kind of definition, it includes the Irish Republican Army and Daesh but excludes the Nazis in Germany or Sherman's March to the Sea. Here, we seem to have an official government (China's) using clandestine force ...


14

The reason(s) can be gleaned from the previous year's Country Reports on Terrorism, released (regularly) by the State Department. Basically, it says that (1) NK hadn't sponsored a terrorist attack in a long time (it happened to be a 20 years anniversary) and (2) the US had formally committed to [at least envisaging] this step as part of the nuclear deal then ...


14

The Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict (1954) requires signatories to try and avoid destruction of cultural heritage sites since they are all part of our shared cultural heritage. The USA was involved in the creation of the convention in 1954, but didn't actually accede to the treaty until 2009: during ...


8

Germany considers the PKK to be a terrorist organization. This goes back to some violence in 1993. At the same time, some Kurdish activists are organized in the "Democratic Kurdish Civic Center Germany," which is officially not part of the PKK. Their rallies must not show PKK insignia, since the PKK is banned as terrorists, or their activists may be ...


7

With regard to the convention: It requires signatories to institute laws which forbid its military from damaging cultural properties including ensuring that its judicial system is equipped to enforce the regulations. In the US Navy's case, it would require that JAG or Shore Patrol document and prosecute violations committed by US officers. A civilian ...


7

It's a bit too soon to be 100% sure on the details, but it looks closer to what we'd call mob / mafia violence. The perpetrators wearing white shirts were working for the triads, similar to the Mafia in the USA, or the Yakuza in Japan. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triad_(organized_crime) “I have strong reason to believe they were gangsters,” said ...


6

Pretty all definitions of terrorism I'm familiar with define terrorism as the action of the group taken against the government or the population on their own, or financed by foreign agents. Any actions initiated by the government, against own population, can be speculated to be legal measures to bring peace and prosperity, or oppressive actions, but no way ...


6

Why not? There is not a whole lot of constraints on that in international law and, in practice, absolutely nothing preventing political leaders in country B and the local justice system from treating this as terrorism. At most they would risk mild condemnation from UN diplomats or perhaps from the country of origin of the perpetrators, if these happen to be ...


5

Looks like another entry in the fool's game of we'll-be-nice-to-you-if-you-stop-your-nukes with NK. Google "bush north korea terrorism remove nuclear 2008" and you'll find hits right away. A fair bit of hits are behind paywalls or nagwalls though. Financial Times 2008 wikipedia In early June 2008, the United States agreed to start lifting restrictions ...


4

Why did the US add a group to terrorism list and after a while remove it? The following is from a report by the Congressional Research service. Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO), Updated January 15, 2019. FTO Designation Criteria Entities placed on the FTO list are suspected of engaging in terrorism-related activities. By designating an entity ...


3

Al Qaeda remains active, most notably via its franchises. The al Shabaab group controls significant parts of rural Somalia, al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula controls some of Yemen, local affiliates are active in the Sahara, and Tahrir al Sham (loosely linked with al Qaeda) controls some of Syria. Al Shabaab has become more of a force lately, launching a ...


3

The other answers do a fine job to define when a cultural property should not be targeted. However, there are conditions that allow for targeting those sites anyway if those sites are used for military purposes. Putting military assets near cultural sites does not protect those assets. It's the obligation of all countries not to put military assets near ...


3

The law in question is the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Act 2019, which amongst a number of other things made changes to the Terrorism Act 2000 bringing into force a criminal offence for travelling to or failing to leave particular areas of the world. The pertinent parts of the Terrorism Act 200 are: Entering or remaining in designated areas ...


3

Your question begins with incorrect assumptions. The Taliban does not bomb people randomly. They target places and things that are linked with the US occupation. This includes the central government set up with the help of the US, which they consider to be an American puppet. This is all part of normal guerilla warfare.


3

The Taliban mostly bomb big cities they argue that the people in big cities are silence about the West invasion, and they deserve to be killed. For example Kabul, the capital gets bombed now almost daily. The second reason is the Taliban don't want to win the heart and mind of people they want to rule by fear and force which is what they did when they were ...


2

The US State Department actually keeps a list, although to make the list an organization has to not only be terrorist in nature, but has to threaten US citizens or interests (so theoretically, WWII partisans in enemy occupied territory would not make this list). As far as Kurdish groups go, it looks like the PKK (based in Turkey) is on the list, as is AQKB (...


2

Whilst I feel people have addressed the definition of terrorist quite well, it might pay to approach it from the other angle: what constitutes a gangster? Cambridge Online Dictionary suggests: a member of an organized group of violent criminals https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/gangster However, a gangster is, more simply put, a member ...


2

https://ec.europa.eu/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/schengen-information-system_en The Schengen Information System (SIS) is the most widely used and largest information sharing system for security and border management in Europe. SIS enables competent national authorities, such as the police and border guards, to enter and consult ...


2

Questions of the form can X be called Y are usually pointless. With your question, you just called X Y. More relevant is what national and international law has to say. Unfortunately the term terrorist has become a generic catch-all description for people the speaker does not like, much like communist or fascist in an earlier age. When a private citizen ...


2

Isn't this a game. because a terrorist is a terrorist is a terrorist. Terrorists don't change. Some of them do. A terrorist can become an ex-terrorist, possibly even a repentant ex-terrorist who helps building a more peaceful society. This tends to be a lengthy process with much soul-searching and possibly splits in the terrorist movements between peace and ...


2

Terrorism is defined by Merriam-Webster as "the systematic use of terror especially as a means of coercion." In other words, violent acts are committed in order to produce a psychological effect with political influence. Assassination of a political leader may or may not be designed to induce fear. So as a general claim, the answer is no.


1

Bin Laden, Al Qaeda's leader, was killed in 2011, and they seemed to have lost power ever since: In 2009, President Barack Obama’s so-called AfPak strategy gave top priority to the defeat of the al-Qaeda core in Pakistan. A relentless campaign, primarily using drones and highlighted by the 2011 commando raid that killed bin Laden in Abbottabad, gradually ...


1

There are many such databases. Another answer mentions the Schengen Information System, but countries outside the EU and the Schengen area cannot participate. This includes the US, of course, which you mentioned in your question. Some countries share such information bilaterally. For example, Canadian border officers have access to the United States' ...


1

Because Osama didn't want to be captured If Osama had tried to surrender the SEALs were under instructions to allow it. He didn't try to surrender however, which mean the SEALs used lethal force. See Wikipedia article on the Death of Osama bin Laden. The Associated Press reported at the time two U.S. officials as stating the operation was "a kill-or-...


1

The British government published an October 2015 report on the state of Northern Ireland paramilitaries, drafted by MI5 and the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI). The short of it is that all terrorist groups which were active during the Troubles still exist. Except for a few dissident republicans, all other terrorists are dedicated to peace and ...


1

To the general version of the question as phrased in the title, No. By definition, this could have made the colonial Americans and any other armed group engaging in revolution or dissension "terrorists" while their national identity was being forged, therefore a de facto or assumed or inferred identity could be applied until their identity is formally ...


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