New answers tagged

1

The problem with the word terrorist and its formal definition as outlined in the (very good) answer by user4012 is that the word usually carries negative connotations while the formal definition tries to resort to facts that can be established. The formal definition and the general usage and connotations of the world can lead to conflicting outcomes with one ...


-2

No, Nelson Mandela was part of a liberation movement which successfully liberated South Africa from the abomination of apartheid. Apartheid is now seen as a crime against humanity by the UN, and in fact this situation was the defining case and the crime named after it. It is a charge currently being directed at Israel by several prominent human rights ...


-4

No, Nelson Mandela was not a terrorist. He peacefully terminated the apartheid regime: The Nobel Peace Prize 1993 was awarded (...) to Nelson Mandela (...) "for their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa." source: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/1993/...


2

As an aspiring political scientist, the answer is rather disheartening. A policy to "never negotiate with terrorists" actually benefits the terrorists. The reason is simple: when no terrorists are negotiated with, a "pooling equilibrium" is created that throws all of the soft-liners in with the hard-liners. This happens because the people ...


2

I once read that one of the goals of the terrorist attacks is to make Muslim minorities in Western countries feel hostile and not welcome in their environment. To some extent, they want to provoke people in Western countries (with different beliefs or no beliefs at all) to perform hate crimes against Muslim minorities as an act of revenge. By turning into ...


2

This is a more complex question than one might realize. The modern political world (since the early 20th century) has been marked by a dramatic increase in the power and efficiency of national military and police forces, both in terms of military hardware and surveillance capabilities. This has pushed counter-national movements to organize as partisan forces:...


3

They were at the time losing the open war in Syria. The terrorist attacks drew away attention from those losses. Map of IS-controlled territories by the BBC:


13

It's extremely difficult to get into the specific motivations of individual actors or even organizations, absent explicit statements - which are often of questionable credibility if the speaker knows their statement will be available to public scrutiny. This thesis lays out a review of the relevant literature on the matter, and identifies five main ...


24

The involvement of ISIS in terrorist attacks on the West is actually more limited than one might expect. Especially when excluding those attacks that weren't planned by ISIS, but "only" inspired by them, they mostly focused their terror attacks on the middle east (see also this map; this approach differentiates them from eg Al Qaeda). Of the ...


0

Clearly, the US government decided early on on an entirely different extra-legal response to the attacks. The invasion of Afghanistan is part and parcel of this response but you could also mention Guantanamo Bay and the whole network of covert detention sites and extraordinary renditions that was very active in the aftermath of the attack. Some officials ...


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