9

According to this source (German newspaper), the German part of the EVP (CDU/CSU) voted for anonymous votes. Which isn't surprising, as this party tends to favor companies who coincidentally gifted large amounts of money to them. They have absolutely no interest in people knowing who's paying them how much and who visits them how often. Neither in Germany ...


8

Wikipedia has a complete list. Bottom line is, 96 countries have some form of such a law, the oldest dating to Sweden from 1766. Most of the big countries have such a law, the exceptions being Russia, Spain, Portugal, and Argentina. Rare to find such laws are in the Middle East, former Soviet Union, and Africa.


5

Are all votes done not recorded to the name of the voting politician? Yes Not all votes are recorded to the voting politician. A voice vote, or division vote does not record the individual votes of the members, only if bill passes/fails or count of the yeas/nays respectively. Senate A voice vote occurs when the presiding officer states the question, then ...


5

TLDR: Decision making in EU is generally done with the following steps: 1) The European Commission conceptualizes legislation and make a proposal to parliament and council. 2) The EU parliament does two things: -----2.a) It puts its committees to examine, amend, and vote (committee meetings votes), and the committees build a report and put's it on for ...


4

Not always. Especially when it comes to elected positions, they are political actors who negotiate outcomes with other political actors. In this, they will have allies and enemies. If allies cannot coordinate their positions, the negotiation process breaks down. There has to be a process to scrutinize communications after the fact, when there is suspicion of ...


4

a box until the information can safely be declassified, but for example no longer than 10 years or so Ten years may not be enough. For example, an intelligence asset may still be in place after ten years. Consider a new officer in the military. Just the military career might last forty years. Such a long term relationship is no longer possible under ...


4

govtrack.us is a good resource for checking which politicians voted for which bill(in the United States) You can use it to check specifically which legislators voted for a particular bill You can also track statistics and votes of individual representatives, although I haven't explored this feature too terribly deeply For instance, here's the page for ...


4

Hansard is the official report of the proceedings of both houses of parliament. The votes that come from this are accessible through the parliament.uk website. Unfortunately, they're broken down by date. It is often easier to read them both in tandem as the votes can be a little confusing unless you know exactly what you're looking for. There are two ...


4

In a word, no. There are examples of complaints against individual police departments investigated by the USDOJ that lead to an MOA, Memorandum Of Agreement. One example I can cite is from the Prince George's County Police Department in Prince George's County, Maryland. In the MOA, they agreed to use dashboard cameras, and body camera technology wasn't as ...


4

In the Australian Parliament, there are two types of votes: "votes on the voices" and "divisions". Votes always start "on the voices". When voting "on the voices", there is generally no record of which way an individual member or senator has voted. The Speaker (in the House of Representatives) or the President (in the Senate) will ask members/senators ...


2

No, local police are under state/local control and the president runs the federal executive branch. The president isn't even really a policy maker- that role falls to Congress. But even congress can't dictate a camera program because their control doesn't extend to local police. This exact issue was litigated in the early 90s in Printz v U.S. (1997) when ...


2

Yes, private police organizations can be legal. There is actually no such thing as "the police". What there actually is, is a series of organizations given "police powers" within certain areas of responsibility. This Wikipedia page shows just how many different types there actually are: Federal police (including some entire departments like the TSA), ...


2

One obvious benefit is transparency. You would know at all times what your representative is saying in official correspondence, which could later be used to catch them in wrongdoing. Many political scandals in the U.S. came to light as a result of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), under which any citizen can demand the official communications of most ...


2

Data Protection At some point the civil servants are going to mention someone who is not a civil servant, and possibly in relation to a confidential matter. Appropriately redacting all of those is going to be hugely expensive.


1

As previously stated, this is a very broad list of questions. You also fluidly meld Freedom of Information concerns regarding Governments AND corporations together, as if the two are related. Freedom of Information laws (such as the US's Freedom of Information Act) were implemented in an effort to at least give a semblance of transparency, as well as allow ...


1

There are a few separate issues wrapped up here: 1. Is it legal for a police organization to incorporate as a non-profit? The process of incorporation, which creates a corporate entity under state law, is not really objectionable in this situation. The barriers to incorporation in the US are nominal, amounting to little more than a small amount of ...


1

If you are talking state level or people running for office at Federal with only state experience, you can look at the state legislature pages as many, like Iowa, have bill tracking tools. https://www.legis.iowa.gov/Legislation/BillTracking/billTrackingTools.aspx


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