New answers tagged

-2

The key element of inciting the insurrection was convincing the capitol mob that they were patriots and needed to take back the election by force was the big lie that the only reason Trump lost was election fraud. This single element transformed criminal insurrectionists into Boston tea party patriots in the minds of the insurrectionists. When Trump's words: ...


0

Your confusion comes from the fact that you are thinking an impeachment is in some way similar to a criminal trial. It is not, impeachment is 100% political. The Senates duty to hold a “trail” is nothing more than a duty to make a decision. There is no time frame during which they have to make that determination, and there is no requirement for them to do ...


18

Due process means (put simply) that the government will not punish a citizen for a crime unless it has been demonstrated — within a prescribed set of legal procedures — that the crime was committed by the person in question. Usually this means things like avoiding unnecessary delays, ensuring proper counsel, preventing expropriation of money or property, and ...


11

First off, he's making a political statement, not a statement of legal fact. As a matter of professionalism he'll aggressively advocate for the interests of his client, and this can often result in public claims that various sacred rights have been trampled, even if on a technical, legal level this is total bullshit and he knows it. That said, as to the ...


8

The impeachment by the House of Representatives took place and was passed while Mr. Trump was still President. The impeachment trial by the Senate started after Mr. Trump left office; he is no longer the President. The Constitution does not cover this particular case.


0

The House and Senate each have their own rules which they each make for themselves. Neither is obligated in any way to abide by the other's rules, nor (directly) able to influence the other's rules (of course, there is indirect influence simply because the leaderships of each party in both houses typically share the same goals and work together to accomplish ...


11

Why another impeachment vote at the Senate? The Senate typically holds multiple votes regarding an impeachment, two at a very minimum. The Senate, with responsibility typically delegated to the Senate Rules Committee, makes up its own rules on how to proceed with an upcoming impeachment trial. The Senate as a whole then votes on the rules of the trial. ...


32

Most of the Republican portion of the Senate are objecting to the second Impeachment trial as unconstitutional because it is taking place after Trump has left office. They contend that because Trump is no longer the President he cannot be tried for impeachment by the Senate. The Senate appears to have actually voted twice on this issue. Initially on Jan 26th,...


Top 50 recent answers are included