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7

ISDS is not unique to TTIP, and ISDS is not new. It is also contained in CETA, NAFTA, TPP, and many bilateral trade agreements. However, not all free trade agreements include ISDS, and countries like Brazil refuse to sign treaties of which ISDS is a component. ISDS is criticised by many, including by The Economist (not your average socialist magazine): ...


7

VoteWatch has the results of the Negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) of 08/07/2015, but it says 436 For and 241 Against. It lists how all MEP have voted and many other interesting statistics, including if the single parlamentarian were loyal to their group. It also shows that the two main groups European People's ...


6

Basically, the way this works at the moment is that, because the EU has a “single market”, it also handles negotiations on trade agreements with other countries. Should the UK leave, it could immediately join the negotiation and/or enter any trade agreement on its own. So the UK could easily become a party to the TTIP or any other similar agreement that ...


5

There are two separate parts to this (1) Britain's elected leaders wanting not to be a part of a TTIP-like agreement and (2) Britain's ability to negotiate a better deal outside of the framework of the EU. Desire to avoid TTIP Currently one of the biggest supporters of TTIP in the EU is the British government itself, Prime Minister David Cameron has pledged ...


4

As per the Article 8, comma 4, of the "EU Council Decision of 23 September 2013 on the security rules for protecting EU classified information": Areas in which EUCI classified CONFIDENTIEL UE/EU CONFIDENTIAL or above is stored shall be established as Secured Areas in accordance with Annex II and approved by the competent security authority It ...


3

We must distinguish two types of agreements. Some international agreements can remain secret, if they don't impose rights and obligations on persons. For example, treaty on cooperation of intelligence services. Those treaties, however, cannot be enforced in court (there may be some arbitration or ad hoc tribunal set up, but in all cases, only states can be ...


2

Virtually all treaties in the Netherlands have to be approved by Parliament, although often a silent procedure is followed in which the treaty is deemed to have approval if no request for a parliamentary evaluation has been lodged. But even in that case a referendum may be requested. An exception I know of is when legislation has to be introduced at high ...


2

This episode will explain it. Basically the negotiators have pressure from all sides and they need to make bargains and deals that special interests would not like. They also have to collect information surreptitiously. http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2015/06/26/417851577/episode-635-trade-deal-confidential SMITH: Ron Sorini was one crafty negotiator. In ...


2

The ratification involves, as you've cited correctly, only national parliaments. Indeed are there only 27/28 member states (post/pre-Brexit respectively), but the total number of parliaments that have to ratify depends on the constitutions of the member states. The following 13 states have a bicameral system, Austria Belgium Czech Republic France Germany ...


1

But as I understand it, this is a right granted exclusively to foreign businesses. That's true as far as the TTIP is concerned. This is an international trade pact which relates specifically to international companies. Generally speaking, national companies already have the right to sue their own governments. The TTIP doesn't change that. It makes ...


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