61

Is there any reason be it written or traditional that would permit Mr Blackford to stand across the line or is it simply permitted because nobody objects? There is a rule is that members cannot speak from the Aisle, which is delimited by the two red lines, and so presumably it's allowed simply because nobody is objecting. However, Blackford's intent here is ...


48

In the UK, two fingers is an insult much like the middle finger in the USA. Done in a palm-out orientation it is the victory sign, as done by Winston Churchill. The other way around, palm inwards (knuckles out) it is just like the middle finger.


45

According to VOA, it hasn't been this blatant before, at least as actual elections go: During his time in office, Trump's predecessor, Barack Obama, weighed in on Brexit in 2016, provoking fury from the referendum's supporters for saying London would be at the "back of the queue" for a trade deal if it left the European Union, noted Ben Riley-Smith, U.S. ...


25

The Commons agreed to the second reading of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, which (if it eventually passes all its parliamentary stages and receives Royal Assent) will turn the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement into law. Second reading is a debate on the general principles of the bill, and it is possible to have concerns about a bill but still vote ...


24

In the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the two fingers (sometimes also two-fingered salute) is a sign whose meaning can approximately equated to the middle finger which is used in North America, Europe and probably other places. Both are a hand gesture with the palm facing inwards and fingers streched out: index and middle finger in the case of two fingers. ...


21

The rule was introduced in 2001, following the 2000 election of Michael Martin. That election took place "by means of a conventional parliamentary motion with recorded votes on an amendment for each candidate". Due to the large number of candidates, the repeated ballots took 6 hours. The process was also politically charged, with party whips lobbying MPs to ...


20

It's generally not done in US politics with other functional democratic countries either, not just the UK. Doing so is simply really bad statecraft. The problem with weighing on one side in an election in is that regardless of the result, parties and the masses who support them remember that kind of political attack. In a functioning democracy, today's ...


19

"Brexit Party itself doesn't seem to be gaining anything" It's important to remember that the Brexit party is not a normal party. It is a personal vehicle for Farage; that's why he abandoned UKIP in the first place. It is not a mass-membership party organisation. If you read the "articles of association", you will see the statement "the membership is small ...


18

Simply because continuing would reflect badly on him and by extension, Sinn Fein. By resigning the damage was limited. As an aside, as resignation is actually not possible, I note that he used the usual mechanism of accepting (just for the purposes of disqualification) a paid position from the monarch, something slightly amusing in context.


18

As he is not carrying a sword it is less of a concern I suppose: "Traditions in the Chamber: MPs are not allowed to speak in the space between two red lines running along the length of the Chamber. It has been claimed these lines are traditionally two swords’ lengths apart to prevent MPs duelling although there is no evidence to support this." (...


18

There is no precedent for requiring a supermajority in the commons - the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act was the first time this was ever required. There is, therefore, no precedent for circumventing such a requirement in this way, but this is simply because it has never been necessary. This method of getting around the supermajority requirement may seem odd, ...


17

Yes. It is a flaw in the British system (I am British). On the other hand, most British voters are effectively disenfranchised, because their vote will never make a difference to the result: they live in seats where it is possible to predict which party will win without knowing anything about the candidates. A better system would involve appointing the ...


16

It's not true. The rule would be completely unworkable; Opposition MPs would be unable to table any amendments to government bills, since they'll almost inevitably have voted against the second reading of the bill. All rules I've found regarding tabling of amendments simply refer to "members", making no other distinction. They might control the timings or ...


14

The quote is a little misleading. Motion #1 on the order paper was to approve the Withdrawal Agreement. However, the Letwin amendment was agreed on a division, and the amended motion was then agreed without a division. Motion #2 was to approve a no-deal: That this House approves the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union under Article ...


14

Can Parliament be compelled by the courts to not frustrate the 2019 Withdrawal Act Amendment "Exit Day", using the Padfield Principles, and thus be compelled to let the UK leave the EU on October 31st? Absolutely not. Padfield is not applicable here, as that principle refers to the obligations of ministers not to frustrate Acts of Parliament. Instead, the ...


13

Probably, at least in part, because people who voted leave are also more afraid of immigrants taking their low-skilled jobs. A larger flow of migrants from Eastern Europe reaching a local authority area with a larger share of unqualified people or a larger share of manufacturing workers is associated with a larger Vote Leave share, whereas the opposite is ...


13

He was actually more explicit He goes on: ‘The Benn Act, shows you you can do things very quickly but, perhaps more importantly, we got rid of the King Emperor in 24 hours in 1936, we can get rid of the Imperial yoke of Brussels just as quickly I would expect.’ So he was referring to the abdication of Edward VIII.


12

One could feel disenfrachised for all sorts of reasons: you could be in a politically 'safe' seat, or be an environmentalist in one of the constituencies that the Green Party doesn't field a candidate, or even in Northern Ireland where the major parties don't stand. There was a candidate standing as a protest against this tradition in the last election, and ...


12

There are a number of factors here which may be relevant, although as observers we cannot be certain which are actually weighing on private decisions. In favour of the 12th: The 12th of December is a Thursday, which is the de facto standard election day in the UK. Parliament must be dissolved for a 5-week election campaign. That means that if the election ...


11

It's not an accurate description. What is true is that Bercow just dismissed the government's attempt to pass the deal by motion again. (Web confirmation.) The deal can still pass by legislation (instead of motion). The government has announced that they will introduce deal legislation today. When it will be voted on is another matter. The Letwin amendment ...


10

We'll put aside the technicality that one does not resign from the House of Commons, but rather disqualifies oneself from eligibility to sit. But that's separate from your question. There is more to Parliamentary work than sitting in the Chamber and passing through the division lobbies (as important as those are). Much of the work of an MP will also ...


10

There's one problem with any referendum with more than two options: Arrow's Impossibility Theorem. This states that if you have three or more options, then the following cannot be simultaneously satisfied: If every voter prefers alternative X over alternative Y, then the group prefers X over Y. If every voter's preference between X and Y remains unchanged, ...


9

Frankly "scrutinize it" is not the whole story for why the programme motion was defeated. According to the Guardian: The rebellion against the programme motion was led by the former Tory chancellor Philip Hammond, and one of Johnson’s leadership rivals, Rory Stewart. They were keen to secure reassurances that if the government had not succeeded in ...


9

Technically yes, but the agreement has been in question since November last year, when the DUP abstained on a Finance Bill, to indicate their displeasure with (then) May's Brexit approach. The DUP has abstained from supporting the Government in a Finance Bill vote, calling into question its confidence and supply agreement with the Conservative government. ...


9

Bercow deposed for the duration of the consideration of the Bill, a deputy takes over No. After a bill has received its second reading, it is sent to a committee. For particularly important bills, or for bills which need to be considered quickly, a Committee of the Whole House is used. For historical reasons, this is chaired by the Chairman of Ways of Means,...


9

I can't speak to legal issues with UK referrendums (though my understanding is that Parliamentary Sovereignty means that pretty much anything is possible if Parliament agrees to it), but the "fairness" issues would be significant. There are many ways to set up such a poll, but every option is going to influence the result in different ways. One possible way ...


8

No. It's usually expected that somebody has read it, and this is supposed to happen in the committee stage. It's not formally required by the process. Very few votes are free votes: most are to some extent "whipped", where MPs are expected to follow the party line. The "three line whip" is where the statement of how they are expected to vote has been ...


8

Beyond the obvious (and possibly true) comments to be made about idealists with less exposure to the realities of life, and the general truism that voters in general seem to be more tribal than logical, the fact is that you can support a candidate despite him having one policy you disagree with if you believe that his or her package as a whole is the best. ...


8

The deadline for withdrawing a candidacy is the same as the deadline for filing nomination papers. For this election, the deadline for both is 4pm on Thursday 14 November. Source: Electoral Commission


7

The short version is the Letwin amendment made the main vote legally pointless. The following vote was to be the one on the main motion, that is the original motion, as modified by the amendments which passed. The original motion was That, in light of the new deal agreed with the European Union, which enables the United Kingdom to respect the result ...


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