New answers tagged

2

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say no, not on home soil - unless you count joint press conferences with EU dignitaries. While Steve Melnikoff's answer shows that David Cameron did give a solo press conference accompanied by the EU flag, this was taken at the European Council headquarters in Brussels in 2010. The only examples I was able to find of ...


1

Yes. Exit polling is considered to be about as accurate as possible for election polls, under traditional circumstances. Whether that applies to the 2020 election cycle is certainly up for debate, give the large first-time shift towards greater mail-in voting. But under the more traditional circumstances: #1 - pre-election polls are about how people are ...


20

The answer to this question dates back to 2019. Theresa May's government rejected the current solution, a border in the Irish Sea, and instead proposed a "backstop" that would keep the entire UK aligned with EU rules until a better solution could be found. That proposal was soundly rejected by the UK Parliament, with both Tory and opposition MPs ...


6

British Indian Ocean Territory isn't very "British", nor is it very "Indian". In the late 60s and early 70s the native people were expelled and now the only inhabitants are American service personnel. The islands are now de facto American territory, as the only human activity is the US base. The only motor vehicles are US military ...


2

I see Boris Johnson has been making a talking point out of cancer treatments: Thirty medicines are no longer available in Northern Ireland because of rules enforced at the border with the Republic of Ireland following Brexit, the Prime Minister has said. Speaking at the recent G7 summit, Boris Johnson reportedly said that the medicines and one innovative ...


4

The government is concerned about the Protocol's requirements (Article 7) that manufactured goods placed on the market in Northern Ireland (including medicines) comply with both EU and UK regulations - even if they are only to be consumed within NI. In fact, it argues that because medicines are so tightly controlled and regulated, there would be little risk ...


36

The problem is the Brexit Trilemma. From Wikipedia: Following the Brexit referendum, the first May government decided that not only should the United Kingdom leave the European Union but also that it should leave the European Union Customs Union and the European Single Market. This meant that a customs and regulatory border would arise between the UK and ...


21

The argument appears to boil down to: the situation under the current Protocol is unsustainable, the British government feels that it would be entitled to invoke Article 16 of the Protocol, allowing it to unilaterally take action, but would prefer to proceed bilaterally with the EU to come to an agreement which both sides can be satisfied with. The ...


62

Brexit recreated/uncovered problems which the EU membership of Ireland and the UK had allowed to recede. If there are no hard borders, then people and goods can travel from the rest of the UK to Northern Ireland (NI), from there to the Republic of Ireland (RoI), and from there to the rest of the EU. The Brexiteers wanted to "take back control" of ...


1

TLDR: they estimate turnout rates using data from the British Election Study, which in some cases has validated vote records. The answer to your question is yes, at least for the 2017 election. From their article in the International Journal of Forecasting: For each application, we estimated the conditional probability of turnout p(T_i = 1|X_i) as a ...


5

As I understand it, this was a result of the Soham murders: two 10 year old girls were killed by a Ian Huntley, who worked as a caretaker at their school. Huntley had a history of sexual offences, but for various reasons had never been charged. As a result this history was not known to his employers. This led to a more stringent system, including the ...


9

There is no magic rule that says that misconduct must be either legal and have no consequences, or must be a crime. The British government, in particular, has long recognized a place for concepts like "moral character" in occupational and business licensing and for immigration and nationality purposes, that leaves open the possibility of conduct ...


10

It seems that Margaret Thatcher also broke a three-line whip during her time in the House of Lords to vote for an amendment to the European Communities (Amendment) Act in 1993 which implemented the Maastricht Treaty. This amendment would have only allowed Maastricht to be implemented with the consent of the British people in the form of a national referendum....


4

Not leaving the U.K. carries no dead loss transition costs and hasn't had any catastrophic negative consequences so far. Inertia is powerful and you shouldn't fix what isn't seriously broken. Not leaving the U.K. avoids unnecessary political conflict over shared resources (from national football and Olympic stars, to offshore oil and gas rights, to national ...


13

Edward Heath, (PM in the 1970s) defied an opposition whip in 1997 by abstaining on the vote on the Treaty of Amsterdam. He was the only Conservative to defy the whip on this vote. (source, page 2 paragraph 4)


5

One argument that has been made is that Scotland would lose some access to the UK market, which is a major one for its economy. There seems to be some truth in that, as we have seen that Northern Ireland, which is part of the EU's economic area with a border down the Irish Sea separating it from the rest of the UK, has not been able to retain unfettered ...


8

While the UK was still in the EU, an independent Scotland remaining in the EU would also enjoy unfettered access to the rump UK market through the EU single market framework. In that scenario, it would get the best of both worlds: access to the UK market and access to the rest of the EU single market (and increased autonomy/sovereignty on other matters). ...


-2

EU membership or not would be an argument hotly debated by the media, but far less important among the voters. People realised that the exit of the UK from the EU is more a formal than actual. The UK still has a lot of agreements binding it to the EU and the change for Scotland from the UK to the EU would have little economic impact.


2

Helen Whately, the Minister of State for Social Care, gave a round of interviews on the morning of July 5th. She was a little tight-lipped when asked on BBC Breakfast (around 7:35) whether she would continue to wear a mask after it was no longer compulsory, saying that she would "follow the guidance" and "take personal responsibility", ...


2

By implication, the Prime Minister said in the TV briefing that some circumstances would cause him to wear a mask. He used the exact same comparison as the Health Secretary. Although, the Prime Minister did not specifically say a situation where he would wear a mask. Asked where and when he would continue to wear a mask, the PM said: "It will depend ...


3

There is one opinion poll conducted by Survation from 9 to 17 June. In the crosstab with the 2019 General Election Vote, 80% of those who said they would vote for Mr. Galloway said they voted Labour in 2019, with none having said they previously voted Conservative. Note that only 20 people in the poll said they would vote for Mr. Galloway, and so a large ...


Top 50 recent answers are included