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2

Life as an undocumented migrant is hard everywhere, in UK as well as in France: you know (almost) nobody, you understand and speak more or less of the language, you are not allowed to work nor to rent a flat, you fear arrest and possibly extradition, sometimes you are in physical danger from outlaws or gangs, you are not accustomed to the climate... That's ...


19

The principal power of the Church of England in the House of Lords is vested in the Lords Spiritual - Church of England bishops who are granted seats in the House. Since the Bishopric of Manchester Act 1847, the number of Lords Spiritual has been set at 26. Five of these seats are granted automatically - the Archbishops of Canterbury and York and the Bishops ...


3

I can't comment on the legal issues, which have been addressed by another respondent, but I can provide some background to your second question. There are multiple things to consider: It is still early days. Before Trump, international relations typically happened at a snails pace, with an emphasis on building an international consensus. Take for example ...


5

Regarding how the UK enacts sanctions: the government can impose them by statutory instrument, under powers granted by various Acts of Parliament: The Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 appears to have a number of general powers for unilateral sanctions (e.g. this one), and has been used heavily in 2020 to replace existing EU sanctions with UK ...


12

Different Styles of Political Conflict The world is full of countries which dislike each their respective leadership. Many even trade while they dislike each other. Countries have various means at their disposal, from delivering a diplomatic note to calling the foreign ambassador in to receive a protest, ultimately all the way to breaking diplomatic ...


3

In the press release on the launch of this consultation, the government mentions two reports which contain some evidence to this effect. Firstly, on the more anecdotal side of things, they link to a 2017 report entitled Reversing the decline of small housebuilders by the Home Builders Federation, the representative body for home builders in England and ...


1

On a purely technical note, since the Common Travel Area includes United Kingdom, Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands, a united Ireland leaving it wouldn't automatically cause the area to dissolve. On a more practical note there would still be significant hurdles to immigration controls between the UK and a united Ireland. The Good Friday ...


3

Technically? Yes. It would require either a regular majority of the Commons voting through a motion of no confidence in the government or a qualified majority (i.e. two thirds of MPs) voting for an early election. These provisions are set out in the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA). In practice, this is incredibly unlikely given the government's ...


3

Britain has taken action, but its options are limited by China's determination to assert greater control over Hong Kong. There is a strong political consensus in Britain across the political spectrum that China should respect its earlier commitment to "one country, two systems". In response, Boris Johnson has made it easier for Hong Kong citizens ...


7

The Government of Antigua and Barbuda advises the Queen of Antigua and Barbuda's representative, the Governor General, in their role as the head of state of Antigua and Barbuda, to approve or disapprove of legislation. The British government doesn't have anything to do with this process on any level as Antigua and Barbuda is an independent country. The ...


6

There's also the probability that the PM may hit someone while riding his/her bike. It would result in a big splash in the press. This isn't outside the realm of possibility. I once hit a kid while I was out bicycling - he tripped and fell into the street in front of me. Imagine what would result if that happened to a major government figure. For example, ...


2

Without knowing the exact quote you're referring to, nor the context in which this warning was made, it is difficult to give a specific explanation. However, the predominant issue with codifying conventions about which warnings are usually given is the issue of delegating the power to rule on their implementation from the sovereign Parliament to the ...


26

No, it's not forbidden per se, but as Joe C mentioned, the security concerns of the Prime Minister cycling in London probably make it more trouble than it's worth. On the other hand, Johnson has often been walking & jogging in St James' Park since becoming PM. This theory is, however, backed up by the Guardian, which reported in December: He was forced ...


8

It is down to security. The car that the Prime Minister uses comes with a number of security features designed to protect the Prime Minister in the event of an attack, such as armour plating and bulletproof glass. Needless to say, such protections are not available while cycling.


18

UKIP seems to have had a troubled relationship with a couple of its party leaders. Richard Braine, who led the party from August 2019, was suspended from the party while still in office over allegations of stealing data from the party. He officially resigned from UKIP a week later. Additionally, while not a suspension/expulsion as such, Gerrard Batten, who ...


10

David Steel (The Lord Steel of Aikwood) was leader of the Liberal party from 1976 to 1988 when it merged with the Social Democrat party to form the Liberal Democrats. He then remained as joint leader of the party (along with Robert Maclennan) for four months. Following his retirement from the House of Commons at the 1997 general election, he was given a life ...


1

TL;DR - No more than existing, publicly available documents already show Russian interference in UK democracy. Brief mention is made of the Scottish Independence referendum (pg 13) in that, "Credible open source commentary suggesting that Russia undertook influence campaigns in relation to the Scottish independence referendum in 2014." In regards ...


7

It's not customary for a businesses to complain to the European Council. They can lobby it for new rules but its role is limited. The regular procedure to dispute a Commission decision of the kind you are alluding to is to bring the matter to the Court of Justice of the European Union (first to the General Court and, potentially, to the Court of Justice, ...


2

What I gather from the general media coverage is that Starbucks pays taxes everywhere it does businesses. The issue with respect to the Netherlands specifically is this, according to DW: In 2008, Dutch officials allowed the coffee giant to shift profits by paying an unusual royalty to the company's British subsidiary and selling beans to another subsidiary ...


7

Generally, yes, since the partial implementation of the Wright Committee's recommendations in 2010 under the coalition government, chairs of most select committees are elected by the whole House. A list of these committees can be found in Standing Order 122B. However, several select committees, including the Intelligence and Security Committee, have a chair ...


1

The Brexit Party is currently (12 July 2020) polling its members to ask about this With regard to the 3,000,000 citizens of Hong Kong (British National (Overseas) passport holders and dependants thereof), who have been offered rights to come to the UK, do you believe that: a.They should be given total rights to come and live and settle here b.The current ...


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