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In all cases you mention, the losing side had failed already at convincing the powers that matter. So lobbying the UN Security Council is pointless: the Great Power involved will veto any resolution. All those on the losing side are left with, is to lobby at the club for countries that do not matter. In other words: the UN General Assembly. They might even ...


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Going to the UN does, functionally, involve lobbying the great powers. You could speak with the French, American, and Chinese ambassadors to your country or you could go to the UN and speak to the French, American, and Chinese ambassadors to the UN. You're ultimately talking to the same major power brokers. In one case, you just have the benefit that all ...


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In an opinion piece for the Globe and Mail back in 2018, Roland Paris (an international affairs scholar and former foreign policy adviser to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau) argued that a seat on the UN Security Council would afford Canada positive influence on the world stage. For example: last time Canada served on the council, in 1999-2000, it led a ...


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The ten non-permanent seats of the UNSC are distributed on something like a regional basis, but there are elections between the regional candidates. That means getting elected validates the influence and popularity of the country, and not getting elected despite an intensive diplomatic campaign shows a lack of diplomatic leverage. Not trying is one thing. ...


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