New answers tagged

0

A lot of it finds sense in the fact that India has always been an untrustable ally and a string country on its own given the huge markets and other powers in negotiation that it gains. It has always been observed that the US takes sides in a binary quarrel and so it b had realised for a long time that its better to be on the side of India than Pakistan since ...


12

I'm not a patent lawyer and the legislative framework regarding the status of the WTO agreements in the US is pretty complex, but under FSIA a US company by itself doesn't have a lot of recourse if a foreign government decides to compulsorily license a US patent to a company in that foreign country. Basically the US company mostly can't sue the foreign ...


4

As far as pharmaceuticals in least-developed countries, seemingly in 2015 when WT/L/971 was granted, although itself is a continuation of an older policy. But technically that waiver is reviewed annually by the WTO Ministerial Conference. Noting the decision of the Council for TRIPS on the Extension of the Transition Period under Article 66.1 of the TRIPS ...


32

These statements aren't saying that the US President is waiving patent protections, but that the administration supports waiving patent protections. Specifically, the current administration is voicing support for a request to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to temporarily allow its members to ignore their obligations to protect other nations' patents. In ...


0

Being those media outlets owned by the chinese state its quite like in russia where the info spread is very biased. and there's also many reports on china bribing foreign jornalists to spread there propaganda outside china as you can see for example in hte links: https://theprint.in/opinion/china-is-paying-foreign-journalists-including-from-india-to-report-...


6

Four* (NYT) There have been several less public visits to the historic naval base: Yoshida (1951) Yoshida (center right) in Honolulu in Aug. 31, 1951. From AP. "Japanese Leader’s Pearl Harbor Visit May Not Be a First, After All", New York Times: Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida stopped in Hawaii in 1951 on his way home to Tokyo from San Francisco, ...


-3

1824 is the best example. This tie was not a traditional tie, it is the type of "tie" that happened in the regular Senate election in Georgia in 2020: there was one candidate who won a plurality of both popular and electoral votes, and another candidate was selected. The problem was that the plurality was not also a majority.


8

This is mostly a guess, but looking at the Wikipedia page on the matter, most educational associations (teachers' etc.) in the US support the opposite, i.e. permanent standard (rather than DST) time. Since educational associations generally lead Democratic, this may have something to do with it. I'll also note that 15 other states have passed similar laws ...


-1

The President is able to nominate a Vice President to the Senate for consideration, whatever the partisan makeup of the Senate. However, the Senate has to approve the nomination before such a Vice President can take office.


-1

Partial answer: academics are more likely to be liberal than conservative (especially in the social sciences), and hence one would expect college towns to lean Democratic. See this question on Academia.SE. If you're looking for a deeper answer, I don't have one, and judging by the responses to that question there is no readily-available answer.


-2

I see no reason to doubt the results of this study, though I'll admit I haven't done due diligence and critically examined their methodology (subtle methodological errors are the main source of misinformation in academic journal papers...). It also conforms to population norms, in which men are far more likely to commit violent crimes than women, by factors ...


0

To clarify, there is a distinction between power and authority in governance. In the fields of sociology and political science, authority is the legitimate power that a person or a group of persons possess and practice over other people. In a civil state, authority is made formal by way of a judicial branch and an executive branch of government. In the ...


0

This is, at present, a theoretical issue (by which I mean SCOTUS has not consistently ruled in such a fashion as to make it unambiguous). One of the common political theories attached to this area is the Unitary Executive Theory. Most legal scholars seem to endorse a Unitary Executive theory of some sort, but there is little in the way of consensus on ...


0

I can't recall any other countries in the USA's alliance community whose interests are seen to be colliding with the USA's interests. The premise is flawed. The U.S. has conflicts with almost every country in the world over one thing or another, which is why we have on the order of 30,000 full time employees in the U.S. State Department to deal with all of ...


8

Political leanings are influenced by life experiences. College towns have a relatively broad exposure to different cultures and political ideas due to the rotating student base provided by the university. This broader exposure has a distinct depolarizing effect on individuals, where their evident political leanings move closer to what their true political ...


8

Let's see some graphs that illustrate political affiliation by profession: Comparison of donors, farmers (rural) are the most traditional. Young people, college people, and urban zones are especially likely to be concerned with global warming, social justice, urban poverty, and to be more scientific and less religious, than older, rural and les academic ...


0

The interest clashing with someone is never beneficial. Russia and China may be the exception, instead of the "other big guns". The problem is, by having difficulties with Russia and China, the US may make the "other big guns" also have difficulties with them, somewhat willing and somewhat forced. And the US actually has much more ...


21

Edit: More explicit explanation of why this answer is constructed the way it is. There are actually multiple questions hidden in what you're asking: Why is the voting results map so overwhelmingly uniform? Why is the resulting colour blue, ie. why is it uniform in favour of Dems and not Reps? Most existing answers concentrate on #2, but answering #2 ...


81

Cosmopolitanism leads to social liberalism. It's been proven time and again since at least the 1950's: the more you're exposed to a variety of people and viewpoints, the more likely you are to have empathy and tolerance for other people. Empathy and tolerance are the backbone of social liberalism, and of the two major parties, the Democrats are more strongly ...


-1

One problem with trying to sue would be that SCOTUS recently said gerrymandering in general is beyond the scope of Federal courts "We conclude that partisan gerrymandering claims present political questions beyond the reach of the federal courts," Chief Justice Roberts wrote for the conservative majority. "Federal judges have no license to ...


4

The Emoluments Clause of the US Constitution is usually interpreted to mean that political leaders should be free from (corrupting) influences of foreign nations. US political leaders should first and foremost be responsive to US citizens and US states; a leader who is beholden to or overly connected with a foreign nation might be prone to betray the US ...


54

Biden did particularly well in two demographics: Voters under 30 (62% for Biden vs. 35% for Trump) College educated voters (55% for Biden vs. 42% for Trump) So the reason why Biden did so particularly well in university districts could be that college students are the intersection of those two demographics. Another reason could be (but that's just my ...


12

Most likely, it's not registration that's a problem, it's the responsibilities it entails. According to USA DoJ FAQ on FARA, a registered foreign agent is to keep all of the records on their activities for the whole term they are acting as a foreign agent (and for three years after they stop acting as one), and to have these records readily available to an ...


6

As the second part of that clause says, every state must have at least one representative. So if a state had fewer than 30,000 residents, it would still get a single representative. Based on the 2010 census, the average US House district has ~710,000 residents (that will presumably increase a bit once the 2020 numbers are finalized). The population of ...


4

Recorded history is somewhat murky (until the files of the H.W. Bush presidency are unsealed) but there's some evidence the US gov't at the time tried to do it by inciting uprisings. In particular, Bush gave some speeches inciting them, e.g. on March 1, a day after the end of the Gulf War: In my own view...the Iraqi people should put [Saddam] aside [...] ...


2

I'll take a stab at this, from memory: The coalition was brought together to eject Iraq from Kuwait. Broadening its goal to remove Saddam after the fact would have "bait and switch". And would have sat badly with some of the Arab participants, like Syria, which were essentially dictatorships themselves. There was, unlike in 2003 with the more ...


2

It's at least partially due to the current monetization methods of our media. What gets more clicks, some law nerd talking about taxes for an hour, or a cop kneeling on someone's neck? Remember angry clicks pay just as well as calm clicks. This is true of cable news too, not just internet news. You can see this in both parties; Republicans are way more ...


3

There are a number of forces at play in this, but one of the important phenomena at work is the concept of candidate differentiation. During a campaign to be elected, a candidate is almost universally advised to draw distinctions between themself and their opponent(s) so as to help voters perceive a meaningful choice between the candidates. That distinction ...


0

According to "zibadawa timmy", these three requirements are met. The fourth one is contingent on number one. First, the white vote (in these states in particular) is very heavily Republican and the black vote is even more heavily Democratic. This satisfies 2 and 3. The population is clustered enough in all four states I specified to make majority ...


2

Other than just doing the usual political pressure and PR dance to try to affect how the Legislature decides to redistrict (I believe in all of these states the Legislature is in control; some states use independent or otherwise non-partisan commissions), yes, you could sue under the VRA, though the success of such an effort is hard to gauge. Your whole ...


3

The process is spelled out in the Administrative Procedure Act. See, e.g., National Urban League v. Ross and Ohio v. Coggins. Basically, it amounts to a lawsuit against a federal government official in the chain of command involved in making the decision in question filed in a suitable U.S. District Court.


2

Yes. This could be done. Nothing about the constitutional law of impeachment forbids it.


29

The limitations on the discharge of student loans was hardened in the 2005 Act but long predates it. The basic notion is that the education that you receive in exchange for a student loan is not collateral that can be recovered by a creditor. You get to keep your education, no matter what. Since this is a big investment and provides economic benefit to ...


12

Why are US student loans nearly impossible to remove via bankruptcy? History of Student Loans: Bankruptcy Discharge, March 18, 2021, identifies changes in bankruptcy law, that added more and more restrictions on the discharge of student loans through bankruptcy. Further Legislative Changes Related to Bankruptcy Law and Student Loans In 1978, the exception ...


57

I don't think there's a clear and definitive reason. The Nondischargeability of Student Loans in Personal Bankruptcy Proceedings: The Search for a Theory by John A. E. Pottow of the University of Michigan Law School explores the very question you ask here. It provides 6 six reasons for making student loans nondischargeable. I'll try to summarize those ...


2

The proper way to go about it is detailed by ohwilleke's answer. But for the sake of amusement let's ignore that and consider the fallback: Petition/Pressure/Obstruct Congress Reapportionment due to the Census, while required by the constitution, is not automatic and self-executing by default. It requires an act of Congress to determine both how many seats ...


17

The real question is why were there Republican mayors at all? In the last century, exactly four men have been elected Mayor of New York City as a Republican. It's worth noting that party politics in New York State are a bit odd in that it's one of the few jurisdictions where electoral fusion is still practiced, meaning that a candidate may be endorsed by ...


2

The 2016 and 2020 elections involved exactly the same candidates for President and Vice President on the Republican side of the ballot, candidates who were representing the same faction of the Democratic party on the other, and no truly significant third-party candidates. Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden (both of whom were politically prominent enough to run ...


5

Because New York City is overwhelmingly Democrat leaning and there are enough "yellow dog Democrats" (a metaphor that literally means "people who would vote for the Democratic candidate even if the candidate were a yellow dog"), that no one without the Democratic nomination could win as a practical matter. Of course, in extraordinary ...


9

German and US interests collide frequently, but on balance the similarity of other interests is great enough to make that relatively noiseless. A very partial list, in additon to Nordstream: They disagreed about leaving the JCPOA with Iran. They disagreed about the 2003 Iraq war. A good example, Germany did not joint but it permitted the use of bases in ...


2

Does a sitting US president require a passport to travel internationally? The other answer is correct to say that the president has a passport, and in fact the president probably has at least two because he would retain his ordinary passport when the diplomatic passport was issued. But the question is whether the president requires a passport to travel ...


3

Congress moves at its own pace Following a bill from introduction through passage can be frustrating. Ultimately, Congress moves at whatever speed it feels like for a given bill. That's why there aren't any future actions listed on Congress.gov. Since the bill in question has been assigned to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, you can watch the ...


4

I do not think that this single image alone supports the title assertion "higher turnout benefits Republicans." Trump stands out as a "Republican," because of his cult of personality, and the fact that he somehow cast himself as anti-establishment. So it's somewhat plausible to think he polled better among non-voters than voters. Remember ...


5

From the Iowa Secretary of State, Candidate FAQ, What occurs if the election results in a tie? Generally, when a tie occurs between two candidates, lots are drawn (i.e. a name is pulled out of a hat) to determine the winner. In Election Laws of Iowa 2020, 50.44 Tie vote. If more than the requisite number of persons, including presidential electors, are ...


-1

In the United States, all states are sovereign with respect to each other, and are subservient only to the limits specifically placed on them by the federal Constitution (as reiterated by the 10th Amendment). The Constitution does outline numerous powers that are prohibited of the states, but there are no limitations on the structure of each state's ...


6

As Paul Johnson points out, if speakers don't state their motivations we can't answer definitively for them. But it does appear to be an attempt (not for the first time) for American "nativists"† to narrow the definition of who is the "natural" ruling group for some part of the world. Similar terms and ideas go back a long way, and were ...


-1

In general, without respect to party: American voters on average seldom wait over twenty minutes to vote. Entirely banning food and snacks in such voters' typical voting lines would probably not hurt average voters. But in Georgia some citizens had to wait in line over ten hours to vote; compared to the average American voter, that's a 3000% increase in ...


10

There is almost never conclusive evidence in the social sciences (and this is a political science question). The evidence appears to be divided. But there is pretty good evidence that making voting more "convenient" may not have a very large effect on turnout. (I'm pulling some of these from a great summary by Nate Cohn.) Advance voting is ...


4

Doubt it. China never traditionally bought much weaponry from the Europe/USA so it is very hard to see what important systems a 1989 embargo would have stopped being sold. China has had several weapon procurement phases since 1949: Soviet-supplied. This ran all the way up to the China-USSR skirmishes in the late 60s. (bad Russia relations): Indigenous ...


2

What is the timeframe of the question? Today China has a large and capable military. A generation ago it was even larger, but much less capable. Basically, they were forced to catch up on their own, which can be a mixed blessing. The RAND Corporation, an American think tank, has produced this report to show how far China has managed to narrow the gap. China ...


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