New answers tagged

0

The question is " what will happen if the winner is declared but not all mail in ballots received?". Since it is about USA, the answer is that the loosing party will sue. This happened in 2000 when the cause to sue was much smaller. Moreover the lawsuits will be filed in every state where this situation happens (and not only Florida as in 2000).


0

The answer is very simple. The President of the USA is potentially by far the most dangerous person threatening the existence of life on earth. People like Kim-Jong-Un or a few Middle-Eastern religious fanatics don't even come close. When the current President is actively engaged in manipulating the outcome of the next election by direct interference with ...


2

So....election day passes, all votes are counted, and a winner is declared Not quite. If the election goes terribly wrong, the likely results are that either no winner is declared, or multiple winners are declared. If only one winner is declared, the other candidate has no legitimate claim and the situation has been resolved. Washington Post Columnist Max ...


7

538 actually has whole analysis devoted to this, showing both how often a member votes in line with Trump's position and comparing that to Trump's vote share in their district. According to their analysis, Kamala Harris votes in line with Trump's position 16.2% of the time, which is slightly higher than Bernie Sanders 14.2%. In the Senate, Kristin ...


1

In the original design of the US electoral system, the Electoral College was meant to be the stop-gap against this kind of problem. Electors were expected to be (mostly) independent representatives, people who would recognize malfeasance, misconduct, or misrepresentation, and who would cast their electoral vote for the best interests of the nation, not the ...


2

Without knowing the source of your image or how the numbers were compiled, it's impossible to say, exactly. However, do note that GovTrack does rate Harris as the most "liberal" Senator in 2019: most conservative #1 1.00 Sen. Marsha Blackburn [R-TN] #2 0.96 Sen. Joni Ernst [R-IA] #3 0.91 Sen. Mike Braun [R-IN] #4 0.91 Sen. Ted Cruz [...


5

Are all social security offices around the country (USA) closed? No, the offices are open by appointment only. What safety protocols must I follow to visit a Social Security office? (Select: Getting Help from Social Security) Date: July 17, 2020 Due to COVID-19, you must have a scheduled appointment to enter an office. Only you may enter the facility ...


20

I am Canadian. I would challenge your opinion that American Politics "don't have much of an effect on day-to-day life in Canada". Canada and the United States enjoy the largest trading relationship in the world. A lot of the Canadian economy is dependent on trade with America; a leader that has a habit of throwing tariffs left and right can ...


4

I'm going to go out on a limb here, but first, a digression: Stephen Colbert. What kind of person is Stephen Colbert? You don't know. There presumably is a real person named Stephen Colbert, distinct from the character Stephen Colbert he plays on television for entertainment. But it's not easy to tease out which is the person and which is the character, and ...


20

"Obsessed" is rather too strong a term. "Interested in" or "concerned about" might be closer. The big reason is "money", or perhaps "power". The two are closely related. The USA is big, rich and powerful. Decisions of the President will have direct consequences for people around the world. So Canadians ...


51

From a European perspective: The U.S. has a great deal of influence in the world, so the presidency of the U.S. is quite likely to affect your own country in some way. For example: In the last 20 years the U.S. invaded Afghanistan & Iraq, wrecked Libya and tried (and is still trying?) to topple Assad in Syria, which at least in part facilitated the ...


3

Federal cases can be researched on Pacer, the Federal Courts document database. It is not free, but would probably be able to answer some of your questions.


-3

Apart from the reasons presented above, there can be another one: being afraid of one candidate more than being afraid of the other candidate. Say Russia is afraid candidate B will declare war on Russia or it will declare war on Iran, affecting the trade of Russia with Iran. Or the candidate will increase hostility against Russia. In the same time Russia is ...


-1

Robert Reich has an awesome video explaining the answer to your question; it goes thru half a dozen points of direct benefits to Russia with a weakened and untrusted US. The video is titled "Trump and Putin | Robert Reich". The other thing mentioned in some books and sources is Putin holds a personal grudge against the US for humiliating the USSR ...


0

One project I'm aware of is the 'MyReps' tool, which was created by DataMade & the Participatory Budgeting Project. This uses Google's Civic Information API to provide a nice interface which allows you to type in your zip code and receive a list of elected representatives. From DataMade's announcement blog post: In every city, town, and county road in ...


2

I had a quick look around, as you did, but I couldn't find a chart which included the Libertarian Party. Nevertheless, we can use data from the Cooperative Congressional Election Study 2018 to produce one. After weighting the raw data to be representative of the registered voter population, we are left with a dataset which provides education data for just ...


3

I'm not aware of any occasions where a candidate has specifically admitted to running for President with the sole intention of siphoning votes from one of the two main candidates in order to facilitate a win for the other. However, a good example, similar in some ways to West's situation, is that of the Green Party nominee in 2000 - Ralph Nader. Did his ...


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It also served Mr. Putin's interests to show his own constituency that democracy itself is not that wonderful, and that a strong (perpetual?) leader with a plan is better than the wasteful and divisive political campaigns of Western democracies. This was argued in an article in The Economist published on the day of the 2016 elections: Whoever wins the ...


13

It's difficult to definitively prove some of the reasons, because in order to do that we'd have to have access to Trump's financial records. The first thing I would say in terms of "what do they have to gain" is to look at major events that have unfolded over the past few years, and see how much Russia has been able to do whatever they felt like. ...


1

As an alternative way of explaining to the answer posted by @dandavis, it can simply be thought of as a spreadsheet. Each ballot is read and the votes entered into a row on the spreadsheet. In this way, each mail in ballot is captured, but until a formula is used to calculate the total votes for each candidate/proposal (in Excel parlance, a SUM() statement), ...


44

There are two potential gains from interfering in another nation's elections: Gaining political influence: Nation A might interfere in Nation B's elections in order to put in power someone sympathetic to Nation A's interests. This has been a fairly common practice with underdeveloped nations, where a major power works to install a government that will bow ...


5

Vladimir Putin (lets be clear when we say "Russia", we primarily mean one man) is motivated to interfere to make himself look good, and to create fear of the other. As Machiavelli said, "Men are driven by two principal impulses, either by love or by fear". Trump has been relatively sympathetic towards Russia compared to other US ...


41

Russia would benefit from weakening the United States because that will prevent the US from interfering with Russian actions in the Russian near abroad and from formenting a color revolution in Russia itself. Personally I do believe in the former but not in the latter. But it does not matter what I believe as long as Russia is afraid, see this RAND study. ...


13

The directive which this question relates to was issued on March 25th by the New York State Department of Health. It is now no longer available on their website, but has been archived here. It states: No resident shall be denied re-admission or admission to the NH [(Nursing Home)] solely based on a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19. NHs are ...


3

It does everything but count; validates, potentially rejects, and makes the selection machine-readable. It's basically the same step as a teacher would use to grade a test with an answer key overlay; marking which questions were answered right and wrong. This is the step before counting the totals and assigning a grade, which is basically what the tabulator ...


3

A state being "red" or "blue" is a journalistic shorthand, there is no constitutional, legal or official definition. Generally when a journalist says "X is a red state" they mean that it is expected that they will return a Republican in the next (or in a generic) Presidential Election. It is well known that otherwise "Red&...


7

There is no legal definition of blue or red so no. Blue and Red is a way to discuss what states are likely to go for one party's candidate or another. It usually refers to presidential politics. It comes out of graphics on television (or now the internet). To show a graphic of how each state voted, each candidate gets a color. It used to be that some ...


4

The states which will have different electoral maps in 2020 than they did in 2016 are North Carolina and Pennsylvania. In North Carolina, this is thanks to the 2017 Supreme Court decision which found that the gerrymander violated equal protection. In Pennsylvania, this is as a result of a 2018 ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, later upheld by the ...


1

The best example I'm aware of of a campaign using Silver's numbers to validate their own polling is described in The Center Holds: Obama and his Enemies by journalist Jonathan Alter. It relates to Obama's 2012 re-election campaign, at the beginning of which, the New York Times Magazine published Silver's infamous Is Obama Toast? article which described the ...


0

My question is are there any resources to readily identify which bills have been reintroduced from a previous Congress? Not that I could find, after reviewing the Advanced Searches and Query Builder options. And, trying a number of different options. To try (or to understand) this for yourself: Go to the Congressional Record and select Advanced Searches (...


3

There have been a fair few recent state governors who are also businesspeople in companies worth over $100 million. Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York 1959-73, Various; Chase Bank, Rockefeller Center... Mitt Romney, Governor of Massachusetts 1985-2013, Bain Capital Mark Warner, Governor of Virginia 2002-06, Nextel Communications Jon Corzine, Governor ...


-1

The Washington Post has produced graphs using Polidata's datasets on Presidential returns by Congressional District which visualize this data for every election since 1992. Unfortunately, these datasets are not free of charge, otherwise, I would be able to produce more detailed correlation statistics. Looking at the graphs, if a point appears outside of the ...


9

The Nintendo games systems were and are a mass-culture digital product that had a global reach and influence. The Mario, Zelda, and Pokemon franchises are conceived, owned and controlled by a non-western company.


1

Using the latest available (2018) data from the American Community Survey, we can obtain a list of congressional districts with a minority-majority population - that is to say, districts where the proportion of the population identifying as 'White Alone' is less than 50%. Of the 435 congressional districts, as well as Puerto Rico & D.C.'s non-voting ...


11

There are a number of inaccuracies in the reporting. First, what Trump signed was a series of presidential memorandums, not executive orders. The practical difference between the two doesn't really matter in this case, though. Second, what you describe is actually two different memorandums. The first, deferring the payment of payroll taxes, is probably ...


3

Employers and employees negotiate a pay package which can consist of a mix of piecework or hourly, daily, weekly, or monthly payments, deferred future payments from pensions to stock options, health plans, and other benefits. At one extreme, it is "mow this lawn and you get $10, but there is no promise of any sort for the future." At the other ...


10

Why do you think people in the US do not get pensions? Employer-paid pensions, although less common than they once were, are still a thing: https://www.pensionrights.org/publications/statistic/how-many-american-workers-participate-workplace-retirement-plans The problem with employer-provided pensions is that they generally require people to stay with the ...


4

According to wikipedia: There are 23 districts with a majority African American electorate, and 1 with a majority Asian American electorate. All 24 are represented by members of the Democratic Party, and all except Rep Steve Cohen (TN-9) identify as Black or Asian. There are also 20-odd districts with a majority Hispanic (any race). (Note that the wikipedia ...


0

There are multiple objectives, some have already been elaborated in other answers: TikTok does pose some challenges to U.S. national security, through the collection of user data. At the moment, strong action against China is likely to increase President Trump's chance of winning the 2020 election. I believe this is the most important point: China has ...


8

The obvious (and simplistic) answer is that sanctions work best if most countries follow them. So if the US does think it worthwhile to enact sanctions, the next step is to build the greatest possible coalition which applies those sanctions. That might require persuasion of the partner countries, negotiation and compromise on the scope of the sanctions, and ...


4

Yes, but this wouldn't count since America isn't at war with Russia. The entirety of law governing the criminal charge of Treason is given in Article 3, Section 3 of the US Constitution: Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be ...


3

Yes. An executive order can be undone simply by issuing another executive order reversing the first.


5

I hate being the one always pointing things like this out, but... This EO is not meant to actually provide any actual aid. As best I can tell, the GOP stalled the discussions in Congress specifically so that Trump could write this executive order, because it satisfies all their interests. Trump can give the appearance of caring about the issue and providing ...


3

Reactionaries are the opposites of Progressives. Simply put, Progressivism tries to push things "forward", Reactionaries want to push things "backward", and Conservatism wants to keep things the same. Progressivism isn't Conservatism's opposite; Conservatism is the middle value on a scale between Progressivism and Reactionaries. It's ...


4

TLDR Summary The Constitution says electors vote for both President and Vice President 3 U.S. Code § 7 says electors vote for both President and Vice President Some states have "candidates for President and Vice President" in their election laws It's never been done so the above election laws are untested It's never been done so the response of ...


2

Other answers have suggested that Chengdu is "diplomatically equivalent" to Houston, but I would suggest that it is significantly less so. The region around Houston hosts hugely important scientific and industrial bases, whereas Chengdu is not nearly as technologically significant as the coastal cities. China does consider it somewhat sensitive due ...


0

Bit of trivia context; Upon founding of US constitution the VP role went to the candidate with second most votes in the general election. Then the 12th amendment of 1804 required to cast a separate vote for president and VP. But until the 1960's VP's were chosen by the candidate and party, not necessarily before election. Therefore in short, the answer is ...


7

"Surrender" is not a power that is explicit in the constitution. A complete surrender, such as occurred at the end of the second world war in Germany would imply the constitution ceasing to function. The de-facto constitution would be "military occupation" followed by a new constitution written by the victors. However surrender can also ...


0

Let's step back from the legal, religious, cultural and medical details for a second and let's consider both as cosmetic surgeries. Which are controversial when it comes to parents making choices on behalf of their children. Are circumcised males likely to express distress and regret that they have been circumcised, as either children or adults? If a ...


1

In an in-person voting system, an individual must go to the correct polling place to get a ballot. It requires planning and preparation on the part of every voter. In a mail only system, individuals will receive ballots without making any effort at all. This brings up a number of questions, some of which can be adequately answered by the surveys from ...


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