New answers tagged

5

Traditionally, you would write a letter to their office or call them by phone. You can still do that, of course, but you can now also send e-mail. Some even have contact forms that allow you to send a message on the web page. You can find your representative's office at https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative The analogous page ...


1

It's a well established constitutional principle that the commander in chief is a civilian, so yes, she would have to resign. I could not find a statute or regulation stating this explicitly, however.


0

A trade deal is looking more possible than any time in the last 3 months. Bolton is gone. Hauwei is suggesting they are willing to open up their 5G patents. IBM has open sourced the PowerPC chip architecture. Looks like there is a lot going on in the background.


33

Bernie Sanders tweeted the graphic below in April of 2019, it was accompanied by the following text (emphasis mine): Every other major country has made health care a right for all. Anyone who says the United States cannot do the same is selling the American people short. #MedicareForAll While not a definition, the examples speak for themselves. Indeed, ...


29

You can expect truth in campaign speeches, but not scientific definitions. For an approximation of major countries, try the G7. Of course the G7 misses China, India, Russia, Brazil, which are quite important in the 21st century world. Canada: Yes. France: Yes. Germany: Yes. Italy: Yes. Japan: Yes. UK: Yes. Those "yes" are never absolute. Some procedures ...


0

The US does not end fuel subsidies because it does not HAVE fuel subsidies, at least as far as I've been able to discover. Nothing in the linked article (that has actually been implemented) is a subsidy. (The general thrust seems to be that the authors think the US should be charging even higher royalties & taxes than it does, which is hardly a subsidy....


2

Check out https://usarep.org You can compare votes of Senators and House Members apples to apples. Currently, they are highlighting this for Presidential Primary candidates who are also Senators or Congress People. What I like about this site is they have details of amendments voted on. While the Senate website gives a link to their amendments adjacent ...


2

Another reason to keep "important" people from driving is to keep them from having car accidents. In February 1977, Rene Levesque, then premier of the province of Quebec (in Canada) was driving home from a late night poker game. He hit a homeless person on the road, killing him. That was the last time a Quebec premier was allowed to drive. Ref: https://...


1

Why, unlike most of its states governments, does the U.S. Federal Government have a more unitary executive, rather than a plural executive? The convention reasoned that a unitary executive was to be preferred. Wikipedia, Unitary executive theory: The unitary executive theory is a theory of US constitutional law holding that the US president possesses ...


3

Historical accident really. They tried to make the offices independent, but there were issues, and the fixes made to work around them tied the positions together. The original idea in the Constitution was that the states' electors would get together, vote on which two men they thought would make the best President, and the second place vote-getter, being ...


1

Basically an add to Fizz's answer. Large industries certainly draw subsidies. But there are a couple of nuances worth pointing out, largely to do with GAAP accounting and tax law in the US as it applies generally to business operations in the United States, and those that apply specifically to oil, gas and mining. General Accounting and Tax Law ...


8

@Jasper's answer does a good job of explaining, but just to mention that the "no driving" rule also applies to Ex-Presidents. From NBC: That's because current and former presidents and vice presidents are not allowed to operate motor vehicles on the open road. For security reasons, high profile government officials and former officials, like Barack ...


4

As BruceWayne points out, there's no law preventing the president from driving. It's just a really bad idea. If you watch the Zapruder film, you'll see why anybody driving the president needs split-second response times. JFK's armored car appears to slow down momentarily after the first shot is fired, which kept the president in the line of fire. Watch the ...


2

Additionally to Fizz's excellent answer, it's worth mentioning the obvious political reason: the current US government doesn't want to end or reduce fuel subsidies. The main reason why other G7 countries try to reduce their fuel subsidies is global warming, and this is part of their objectives as signatories of the Paris agreement. On the contrary, Trump's ...


11

The answer(s) to a question like this are pretty obvious and not unique to the oil industry: It employs a lot people domestically; almost 900,000 directly, if the industry lobby can be believed. (I'm offering the industry figures here, because the official BLS data is extremely badly organized on this; the derrick operators or "rotary drill, oil and gas" ...


2

The mandate was contained within the memorandum issued by President Trump to the Secretary of Defense I assign to United States Space Command: (1) all the general responsibilities of a Unified Combatant Command; (2) the space‑related responsibilities previously assigned to the Commander, United States Strategic Command; and (3) the responsibilities of ...


-1

The confirmation process has to handle a great number of individual confirmation each year Approximately 4,000 civilian and 65,000 military nominations are submitted to the Senate during each two-year session of Congress. The vast majority are routinely confirmed, while a very small but sometimes highly visible number fail to receive action. Note the ...


3

High-quality counterfeits of high denomination US dollar bills are known as superdollars. Wikipedia's page on the superdollar says: A superdollar (also known as a superbill or supernote) is a very high quality counterfeit United States one hundred-dollar bill,1 alleged by the U.S. Government to have been made by unknown organizations or governments. In ...


0

Okay, so we need some background, so lets first get something out of the way How currencies work First, all currencies have no intrinsic value and merely represent standardization of value between two objects. In a barter system, I might sell you apples for oranges but we have a disagreement on the value of the two fruit because we are literally and ...


-4

I genuinely recommend Sam's answer. It's a great summary of the events. However, I think in one way it elides over why it was considered a scandal by Republicans and something much less by Democrats. Sam's answer contained They [The Obama administration] are also being accused of not reacting strongly enough to the attacks, and not being prepared ...


2

The specific provision in the U.S. Constitution is the first clause of Article I, Section 2, with emphasis added. The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the ...


-6

This is a more or less unresolvable problem, some countries are going cashless to resolve it. Not that that is any more secure but it's at least trying. In theory everything will be cashless by the point you can buy a high end uv printer for five bucks in Nigeria. Large-bill counterfeits are growing extremely rapidly. Within a few decades they will be a ...


7

If counterfeiting US currency (or Euros &c) became common in a country, merchants would A) Invest in better counterfeit detection methods; B) Refuse to accept foreign currency because of the risk; C) Perhaps hire enforcers to track down the passers of counterfeits and show them the error of their ways :-) Indeed, C is what we do in the US, except ...


99

Legally, nothing prevents the U.S. president from performing ordinary activities. In practice, U.S. presidents try to avoid doing things (like driving) that make it harder for the Secret Service to protect the president. But if a president insists on doing something (such as riding a horse on a remote ranch, or cutting brush with a chainsaw on a large ranch)...


0

Legally binding agreements between the states are called Interstate Compacts. Creating them requires an act of Congress (Article 1, Section 10). Some are based on a model agreement, approved by Congress, that any state may join, such as the Driver License Agreement. Prior to the original Driver License Compact, it was not unknown for out-of-state drivers to ...


0

The EU is a net exporter to the US, so this proposed economic "untangling" would likely hurt the EU economically to a substantial degree, leaving aside the geopolitical/strategic aspects. This is probably why no party even the nationalistic ones in Europe seem to seriously propose it. There is some anti-US sentiment in Europe though, or at least anti-US-...


2

You are under a misconception. The Federal Reserve, specifically the Federal Open Market Committee, makes transcripts and minutes both available, with small redaction. Transcripts The most detailed record of FOMC meeting proceedings is the transcript. Beginning with the 1994 meetings, the FOMC Secretariat has produced the transcripts shortly after ...


2

The trade deficit has been increasing: 2015: $745B 2016: $735B 2017: $793B 2018: $874B 2019 (as of July): $505B or $865B if pro-rated (I just did a simple pro-rating, without taking into account seasonal trends). https://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/balance/c0004.html The numbers for China specifically are below, but the trade deficit between two specific ...


1

It's important to understand the technological limitations here. In theory, IP addresses are globally unique and assigned through a hierarchy of non-profits, with IANA at the root. So, in theory, if IANA wanted to prevent North Korea from having IP addresses, they could do that (they don't actually want this, as explained in other answers). In practice, it's ...


1

Some points not yet mentioned in any answer: Embassies in North Korea need the Internet. Currently, 25 countries have embassies in Pyongyang. Very restricted access to the Internet is possible for authorized government-approved officials.


2

Actually, Yes, but the Hiroshima event wouldn't have qualified. The 25th Amendment allows for procedures for the President to declare himself temperarily unable to discharge the duties of the office by a letter to both the Speaker of the House and President Pro Tempore of the Senate. In such an event the Vice President becomes the Acting President and has ...


-2

The answer is no if we consider the biscuit/football as part of a system to launch nuclear weapons at the President's discretion/order. In this Atlantic article, theoretically (although Clinton did lose the biscuit) describes what you posit, but as a scenario if a president lost the id codes. Seemingly, this is a non-delegateable responsibility that a ...


14

Just because you don't have a fence on every piece of land that separates two countries doesn't make the border soft in the sense discussed in the context of Brexit. It might make it soft in some security (or Trump) dictionary, but that's another matter. As far as Brexit goes, a soft border has official crossings that look like in like this video; as in you'...


3

As nobody actually answers.... The soft/hard at least in the Brexit context has nothing to do with how easy/difficult it would be to transfer people or goods illegally, but rather about whether one is required to do "administrative preparations, like reporting what is passed over and/or carrying passports". I have been stopped by a border controller between ...


3

Other than some prestigue and moral victory, not much. There is no such thing as "you must do this, or else" from any international court verdict. And considering that the US (and many other countries) are ready to give the "international law" the middle finger to protect their right and interest, why would you think that they would agree for compensation? ...


3

A question of limited budgets and priorities. Yes, there are illegal immigrants from (or through) Canada to the US, or for that matter people fleeing justice or the draft in the US to Canada. But the numbers are low enough that the US would rather concentrate their forces at their southern borders and the airports.


-2

Bill Clinton and Donald Trump are the two that spring to mind right now, though there's no hard evidence that they are in any way tied to the suicide of Epstein. Both were friends with Epstein prior to his arrest. The case looks worse for Bill Clinton, who made false statements about how many times he was on Epstein's private plane (alarmingly without his ...


0

Section 1 of the 20th amendment to the US constitution says The terms of the President and Vice President shall end at noon on the 20th day of January ... and the terms of their successors shall then begin. So that essentially answers your question. The transition happens at the stroke of 12 noon (eastern time) on January 20th. However, Article II, ...


6

Fundamentally, political endorsements are an indication that the endorsing entity (whether group or individual) believes the endorsee is the best individual for the office being contested. This can help candidates via the following effects (but not limited to): Transitive Influence Endorsements can help voters decide of who to be informed about based on ...


1

There is a two-stage election system, where the primaries are used to select the candidate for a general election. In the general election, there would be an assumption that a Democrat backs the Democrat candidate, and a Republican backs a Republican candidate. In the primary, there is no such clarity. For a potential voter in a primary, an endorsement by ...


1

Every right, that is enforced when it needs to be, cost money. That's why citizens are obliged to pay taxes. There are things that governments spend money on, which are debatable; but there are certainly others that are essential. One of the rights mentioned is free speech. Saying things does not cost money, publishing things, e.g. a newspaper carries the ...


10

The 14th amendment makes defaulting on US public debt, be it held by the Chinese or anyone else, unconstitutional: The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned.


0

Foreign embassies in the USA have some special status, but they are on US ground. There is an exception where the newborn baby of a foreign ambassador or his/her wife doesn't become US citizen by birth, but that is due to the status of the parents, not the exact place of birth - I would think that in most cases a baby would be born in a private home or in a ...


-4

Yes idiosyncratic usage advocacy, (whether politically correct, scientific, religious, or propagandistic), is not unusual in the US, but no, it's rarely applied and most often common sense eventually prevails. Most such articles boil down to the opinions of some outspoken dissenter, who tends to be articulate but unpopular. Popular journalism is the ...


-2

Unfortunately it is all too common. For example, universities are removing portraits of top doctors, scientists, and Nobel Prize winners of the past. The reason? Too many white guys. While this is just applied to science generally, here are some scientific terms or phrases that do apply: Gender is a social construct Female circumcision instead of genital ...


6

It sometimes happens with hot button topics. See for instance race, where terms such as "negro" or "mulatto" went into disuse in scientific publications and public discourse. Or in climate science, where you find terms like climate change, global warming, climate crisis, or global heating -- the choice of words matters. There is also a hilarious episode ...


11

The FEC is meant to be a bipartisan body, meaning there should be an equal number of Democrats as Republicans. It is therefore customary for the President to work with the opposite party to ensure that this bipartisanship is maintained. The last few appointments to the FEC have been in pairs, with one Democrat and one Republican being confirmed at roughly ...


6

There is a lot of misleading information that is being reported out there about the upcoming change. The main misconception is that this change has to do with the automatic US citizenship at birth for most children born to US citizens abroad. It doesn't. The upcoming change deals with a different section of law that deals with citizenship for minors who have ...


2

I note with interest that none of the answers mention Federalist 69. " In most of these particulars, the power of the President will resemble equally that of the king of Great Britain and of the governor of New York." https://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/fed69.asp It is the most King-like of the Presidential powers. In general, I think that any ...


5

I believe the framers of the US constitution wanted to copy the good parts of British and colonial government and abolish the bad parts of British and colonial government. And - at least according to the Declaration of Independence - they believed one of the worst aspects of British laws was the ability of the government to unfairly convict people and ...


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