New answers tagged

18

Personal lawyers are paid for by the President himself while the federal government pays for lawyers from the Office of the White House Counsel (see this WH document for their salaries). Legal teams outside of the Office of the White House Counsel cannot be covered using taxpayers' funds: The White House did not respond this week to requests for comment ...


4

Do any 2020 Democratic primary candidates support repealing the PATRIOT Act and eliminating mass surveillance in the United States? Opponents of the PATRIOT Act and Section 702 mass surveillance claim these programs violate the U.S. Constitution, Fourth Amendment, or may be abused. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, ...


13

Betting markets are not necessarily more accurate than polls. For example, during the Brexit referendum: The political betting markets were far less equivocal, showing a wide lead for remain. In the end, the polling proved more accurate than the political bettors. [...] Andrew Gelman, a Columbia University statistics and political science professor, ...


7

Bloomberg is a late entry, makes the possibility of growth of support more likely; with someone like Biden, if you don't already support him by now, you're probably not going to change your mind in the future. Bloomberg is, AFAIK, also the richest candidate, which gives him more opportunities to increase his support. Also, as a billionaire, he's more of an ...


3

As you and Up-In-Air noted, the Clerk of the House, Cheryl Johnson, is on the left. The woman to her right is the U.S. Senate Secretary for the Majority, Laura Dove.


1

US Chief Justice Roberts' choices of “in conformity with” and “in conformance with” during the swearing in at the Senate. Does the choice of the two different phrases in two different context[s] suggest somewhat different meanings and implications? Yes, but only marginally so. -ity a suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing state or condition. ...


10

What you are seeing are probabilities implied by people placing bets on a particular result, and reflects how much people who place bets expect to receive if they win. On BetFair exchange, if you want to place a bet on Mr. Bloomberg winning the primary, you stand to receive $9.40 for every dollar you bet if he does win. This implies, if the bet makers are ...


40

It looks to me as if the Harvard Law Review is engaging in a rather laboured joke, in the spirit of Swift's A Modest Proposal. To be more precise, it seems to be a satire on the temptation to change the rules when one is losing the game. The problem with that in any vaguely democratic system is assembling the votes to make the change; this proposal ...


2

In part, it has to do with the lower religiousness in the area, as well as different kind of religiousness compared to the midwest etc. [New England] evolved into the most secular part of the country. In the words of one regional missions group, “pulpits that once boasted gospel preachers like Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield now proclaim ...


14

Could they do it? Probably. Several things could go wrong, though. I think changing our system in such a fundamental way with such a contrived method would shake faith in our democracy. It would be seen as illegitimate, even if it was done "by the book", everyone voted the expected way, and the courts declared it legal. While the proposal correctly states ...


2

It would be pointless. You need 40% of Senators to defeat a cloture vote (which is what it's called when the Senate votes to end a filibuster), but only 34% of the Senators to simply defeat the impeachment trial outright. The Democrats aren't going to filibuster the impeachment vote; it would look ridiculous for them to call for impeachment and then obstruct ...


1

The US still conducts deniable operations. This strike was about sending a message: the US has undergone a fundamental change of doctrine. They will leverage their supreme technological advantage to target the regime in Iran (and other states), rather than engage in long-running proxy wars. They will target the people directing attacks and threats on ...


-2

I look at this question in the light of current events. The answers that refer to the rules of the Senate are correct as far as they go, but the impeachment of the President is a special case. When the President is impeached, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides at his trial (US Constitution, Article I, Section 3, Clause 6). Presumably the Chief ...


3

The INF treaty concerned ground based intermediate range missiles. This is to say, missiles that are launched from ground, and whose maximum range is between 500km and 5500km. (310 - 3,420 mi) Did the USA violate the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty? I just want to expand the previous answer: USA has used the Mark 41 vertical launch system on ...


25

Currently, anyone spending less than 20% of their time engaged in lobbying can call themselves an "adviser" or "consultant". Trump says this a loophole that must be closed. I couldn't find anything on this specifically. 2.The Republican candidate wants a five-year ban preventing government officials who have recently departed the government from ...


22

Is there anything stopping an impeachment trial from being filibustered? Yes, there is a specific rule limiting debate time; and, unlike bills, amendments and resolutions, no procedure for amendments or amendments to amendments, and thus no need for a cloture vote to end the debate. It is the cloture vote requiring three-fifths of the Senators to agree that ...


9

Not 100% sure, but I think the rules are that Senators are not allowed to give [unlimited] floor speeches during the trial. They can mainly pass written messages. Senators will only have the opportunity for limited speech at the trial. Members should refrain from speaking to neighboring senators while the case is being presented. Pages will continue ...


3

No and [then] yes, depending on the time frame. The first dimension of DW-NOMINATE, which measures the vote separation on the conservative-liberal axis has been increasing since the 1970s, after reaching a minimum in the 1950s. Figures 2.3 and 2.4 show both the degree of heterogeneity between the parties and the degree of homogeneity within the ...


87

No it wasn't "just another partisan report", the report came from the Government Accountability Office (GAO). They are a non-partisan factual resource body, completely independent of partisan politics. They are pretty much the gold standard for independent legal and policy analysis. Their duty is much like that of an independent auditing firm which is ...


1

She is recognized as the Clerk of the House Cheryl Johnson who carried the articles of Impeachment to Senate followed by House Impeachment Managers.


1

The US is not signatory to the International Criminal Court so it has less concern about war crimes prosecution. See for example Iran has a 'shockingly strong' war-crimes case against Trump over Soleimani's killing — and it could win.


5

Are there rules that these managers can't be changed once the trial in the Senate starts? If so, what is the rationale for preventing a change? There are no specific rules, nor is there any precedent, for changing managers during an impeachment trial. The House managers have been appointed in different ways. Selection of by House:, [p. 59] In the ...


8

It's important to remember that each chamber sets its own rules for impeachment. As such, the answer is entirely in how each chamber votes There's no Constitutional mandate for "impeachment managers". That is a convention of the House. In theory, the House may change its selected managers any time it sees fit by holding a vote to change them. The Senate ...


1

No, there is no requirement for Senators to attend an Impeachment Trial, however only those in attendance are allowed to vote on the verdict. Conviction requires a 2/3rds majority (Rounded Up) of all Senators in attendance, not of all Senators overall, and additionally has no quorum requirements. If the two Senators in the Democrat Primary race feel it is ...


15

I'm not sure there any formally mandated consequences for not attending. On the other hand: Here are the guidelines for how senators are to conduct themselves during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, which is expected to begin Tuesday. They were put out by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. Senators should plan to be in ...


8

Warren has released a tax calculator, according to which Bill Gates would pay $6.319 billion on his $106 net worth in wealth tax (which approximately matches her proposed wealth tax of 6% for >$1b annually). Various sources put the net worth of Gates at $110 billion. In either case, Gates would have ~$100 billion left after the wealth tax. For that matter,...


13

The reason(s) can be gleaned from the previous year's Country Reports on Terrorism, released (regularly) by the State Department. Basically, it says that (1) NK hadn't sponsored a terrorist attack in a long time (it happened to be a 20 years anniversary) and (2) the US had formally committed to [at least envisaging] this step as part of the nuclear deal then ...


5

Looks like another entry in the fool's game of we'll-be-nice-to-you-if-you-stop-your-nukes with NK. Google "bush north korea terrorism remove nuclear 2008" and you'll find hits right away. A fair bit of hits are behind paywalls or nagwalls though. Financial Times 2008 wikipedia In early June 2008, the United States agreed to start lifting restrictions ...


4

As of writing, none of the 2020 Democratic candidates have expressed support for a public option with $0 copays/$0 deductibles. They either: Prefer Medicare for All/single payer instead of a public option. Have released plans to lower copays/deductibles, but do not say they will be $0. Do not mention copays/deductibles at all, instead focusing elsewhere ...


1

By leaving the JCPOA in May 2018, the US did not cancel the agreement. The agreement continued, with the agreement of the remaining parties. The US was not in violation because no rule was broken. There is no rule in the agreement stating that a signatory cannot exit the agreement unilaterally. Furthermore, under US law, the JCPOA was not even a treaty, ...


3

Since the question was re-refocused on the proper use of the term, I'll just quote Merriam Webster: Does impeach mean "to remove from office"?: Usage Guide Verb Testimonial evidence indicates that references to (and calls for) "impeaching" a public official are commonly understood to refer not simply to charging that official with misconduct "...


3

Humans have a strong built-in tendency to work together in groups. However this social niceness has a mirror image on the dark side: one of the things that they are especially prone to working on is hurting people who are not in the group. Sociologists call this "In-group vs Out-group". Its also known as "Us vs Them". In a modern nation there are lots of ...


4

Using war to get support is known as the "Rally around the flag Effect." As per Wikipedia, The rally 'round the flag effect (or syndrome) is a concept used in political science and international relations to explain increased short-run popular support of the President of the United States during periods of international crisis or war. Because rally '...


2

As fair as i can say a number of freight hauling businesses used electrification : Pennsylvania Railroad New Haven Virginian Northern Pacific Milwaukee Shortlines or due to ordinance by law: New York Central (the prohibition against fumes in New York) Mesa Deseret Milwaukee removed its electrification because it was to expensiv, the railroad weren't ...


0

there are multiple groups that act as fact checkers. None of these are official government bodies. First, as another person said, who would watch the watchers? How would you make sure there is no bias in the fact checkers? Much of what is said by politicians as simple as 1+1=2, thus even in fact checking there will be grey areas. Washington Post uses a ...


2

Part of the question boils down to "what is impeachable". One definition, from Gerald Ford (then a Rep) is "whatever a majority of the House believes on a given day". So, yes, it could still be impeachable. I suspect the question was really about what 'should be' impeachable, which in a way, cannot be truly answered, as its a matter of opinion. I would ...


0

The US can strike first any time it wants, we do it all the time. Now, that is technically against international law (and note, I am not taking a position on either side of this, just making a statement). But a Declaration of War, by the very definition of the word "Declare" can not be secret. So no. We can strike first, but we can't do so based on a ...


2

They must be long and dense, often, to fully cover the topic. Yes, this can make it hard for the lay person to understand, but honestly the lay person probably would never understand most of these topics. If there is a question of trust in the government, then surely one would prefer a longer more complete report than the government's own summary of such a ...


3

You are correct, that the verdict in the Senate does not change the fact that a president has been impeached. Search for "impeached presidents" and you will get Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton, neither of which were removed. There is a technical argument that this president hasn't been impeached yet, because the Articles of Impeachment have not been ...


2

The general public is not expected to understand or even read these reports. The reports are produced for the purpose of an investigation and as such must be comprehensive and technical to ensure the fairness of the investigative process. The report is made public in the interests of transparency and to allow others to reference the content. The public will ...


1

Who should fact check, if it's the Federal government then it would be Trumps News, White-house stands behind his statements. There are other media houses - fair journalism that call out Trumps lies with facts, but how can you trust them, they could be partisan. Although, I will quote one source which claims to be nonpartisan and nonprofit. Check this ...


7

I'm assuming that you're asking about a federal watchdog for the President. If that's the case, then the question then becomes: Who watches the watchmen? If someone is in charge of fact checking the President, then who fact-checks the fact-checkers to ensure that the fact-checkers aren't pushing an agenda to make the President appear dishonest? On top of ...


4

Buttigieg would renegotiate with pharmaceutical companies and take away the patents on those companies that refuse to negotiate. He wants to cap monthly out-of-pocket drug costs at $200 for Medicare recipients and $250 for public option recipients. He would eliminate the copay on generic drugs. Biden wants to cap copays at $1000, though many believe he ...


5

Bias is difficult to filter and some times, the information is not correctly known. For instance, President Trump claimed in March of 2017 that his campaign had been spied on by the intelligence community (FBI, etc). This was widely lampooned as not true, included by personnel that we now know in fact did the surveillance. So, it wasn't known correctly. Many ...


2

The reason is simple, as these documents all are investigations into or charges of violations of the law. In law, words have a specific legal meaning as defined by the statute as to what terms mean, not to mention, relies on a lot of jargon often times, from a language nobody speaks anymore (Common Law, the legal system that underpins U.S. law, is much ...


8

I find it best to use a similar process in law in order to describe the effective difference. In criminal law, the process of responding to the commission of a felony goes: An officer responds to the immediate crime. A detective investigates the crime scene, witnesses, etc, and interviews suspects until s/he has found someone s/he believes has committed ...


2

This is something that graduate students, academics, scholars and researchers have in common: namely, the ability to read and absorb a lot! read the prologue what chapters are there in the report? Does every chapter have its own summary? Read the summaries (all of them). Is there something in a summary which catches your fancy? Read that after the summaries....


5

There are several areas where things get confusing. The most common issue is that impeachment is used commonly to only refer to successful removal. This isn't an accurate usage as unsuccessful removal is still an impeachment. For past impeached Presidents the terminology is usually used correctly to refer to those the House voted to impeach. A more ...


25

The world is too complex and too many "facts" fall in a gray area. A famous saying is "there are lies, damned lies, and statistics." "President Obama enjoyed 8 years of a declining deficit and steady standard of living increase." Could be "proven" completely true, or false, based on how one might choose to measure the deficit and standard of living by ...


49

Nothing prevents or bans the broadcast media from Fact Checking political advertising. But broadcasts are prevented from censoring political campaigns. The issue has recently been investigated by PolitiFact in the context of statements by Elizabeth Warren who stated that broadcast media was more robust on political advertising than Facebook. PolitiFact ...


Top 50 recent answers are included