New answers tagged

0

Looking on the FDA website, I found this: Notice of Declaration under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19 In brief, it lays out that the Secretary of Health and Human Services is offering limited immunity from lawsuits and prosecution — at his considered discretion — for medicines and equipment ...


-1

It's the same reason why they think that cutting taxes for the rich is a good thing. The belief that they are one of the lucky/chosen ones, and that their fortunes are going to improve in the future. The conflation of can and will. Trump plays on this all the time, and also plays on the fact that most people don't actually check what he's said before, ...


2

This is a rather tentative/stub answer because the literature in this area is pretty vast, and there are apparently some plus-sides to polarization, namely, reducing corruption. But to answer the question in the direction that was asked, i.e. what the arguments against polarization, here are some such arguments that were advanced in the academic literature: ...


-6

Great ideals in politics faded away a long time ago. If polarization persists it is not as you think a matter of clashing philosophies, but a matter of communication. The media talks about fighting political polarization just to hide the fact that it is one of their most used tools. Actually nobody wants to fight political polarization because it is the ...


1

My answer is based on studies by Michael Kohlberg and the development of cognitive thinking, moral judgement and naive sex-role stereotypes in children. It is not the product of information but the result of naive stereotypes. Not only Americans, no, in all x - countries around the globe there are people who think: I’m a x-man, and it is good to be an x-man,...


6

I thought my footnote to top answer (which I added while the question was closed) might be all I have to say here (i.e. that political polarization largely explains the US poll), but since a rather misleading claim about actual deaths (per day) was made in the now 2nd most upvoted answer (Hatman's), here's a graph from a March 31 BCC video to debunk that ...


6

This probably isn't the answer, but you have to remember that there's a major information imbalance here. Local news focuses on the details of the response at the state and local level, and also includes some coverage of the national-level response. Stories are done about other countries, but they're usually just an overview and focus on multiple countries....


0

There is a fairly simple, and I think blatantly obvious, answer. Things like intelligence and education are not equally distributed among the population. Thus you find on the lower end of the distribution people who lack either the general background or the mental capacity to understand what's actually happening in cases like this. So when you say "...the ...


6

This isn't necessarily a full answer, but it's part of the answer that has been addressed yet and is way too long for a comment. I don't necessarily disagree with the other answers about the misperceptions held by Americans but: America is big. It's also more diverse than someone simply consuming American media might guess. The states, even in today's ...


4

Because many people who take these types of polls don't care about the specific question and use it as a general presidential approval poll It would have been clearer if they had polled and been able to sort by presidential approval, but party ID will have to suffice as that is very strongly correlated to approval rating. There is also the subset of people ...


-7

After reading the attempts to quantify the veracity of the comparisons there is an easy answer that does not require putting people down or rationalizing cognitive dissonance. The actual answer is what does the question mean from the perspective of those answering the question. What people actually think when answering this question: Has the handling of the ...


60

The key assumption you have made is assuming people in the US act sensibly, and that they would base their answer in the poll on facts. This assumption might not be accurate. A recent (Jan 2019) study shows that facts might not be too important in this matter [1]. Inaccurate views of scientific consensus and the willful rejection of scientific consensus. ...


1

Based on remarks made by Trump during a task force briefing, he seems to think that by loaning the airlines money, he is giving the government a share in the airline industries (emphasis mine): With that being said, we have to keep our airlines going. And we’re going to be using some — now, maybe we’ll take a piece of the airlines for the country, for ...


6

While I can't give a definitive answer (not being able to read the minds of US legislators), I can suggest several factors that are at work. First, there's a difference between "adequate rainy-day funds" and being prepared for a 40 days and 40 nights (and perhaps longer) deluge. Second, the airlines' lack of business isn't due to mismanagement on their ...


1

There is no real shortage of toilet paper production, though hoarding is going on at the distribution end, reinforced by media coverage of toilet paper issues. The president may or may not have the levers to increase supply/production, I defer to other answers there. But perhaps a more relevant response, given that there is no shortage, would be rationing. ...


13

To delve a bit into philosophy here, Trump demonstrates a distorted form of what Nietzsche called 'master morality,' which might seem alien to most people. Nietzsche's master morality values strength, power, beauty, victory, wealth: all the material/physical symbols of practical success are interpreted as moral goods, and all their opposites or lacks are ...


2

We’re Likely Seeing a ‘Rally Around The Flag’ Effect Nate Silver had a nice discussion of this here. The take home is that yes, Trump’s approval ratings are up right now, but this can likely be put down to a ‘rally around the flag’ effect where, in a crisis, leaders generally poll higher. This is a global phenomenon. However, due to the economic fallout ...


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President Trump was able to do that with ventilators because of the Defense Production Act: On March 18, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, President Trump issued an executive order that defined ventilators and protective equipment as "essential to the national defense", the standard required by the DPA.[17][18] Later that day, he indicated that ...


2

Unless you're hoping to dredge up Trumpian conspiracy theories here (which he advanced wrt NH before), the simple explanation is the "first past the post system". The popular vote swing was not substantial (+4% more D votes) compared to 2016, but it did put the Democrats over the 50% "bar" on average, in 2018.


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Who has the authority to enforce isolation and quarantine because of a communicable disease?. The Federal government derives its authority for isolation and quarantine from the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Under section 361 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S. Code § 264), the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to ...


0

Supposedly they are now reporting the to the CDC but the details are still a bit hazy. CNN News from March 23: Vice President Mike Pence said during Monday's White House press briefing that 313,000 coronavirus tests having been completed with more than 41,000 tests having come back positive. In the past, Pence noted the testing numbers he provides do ...


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Trump is weighing the economy vs lives saved. That is his job No leader wants to be in the position Trump is in. For instance, it has been stated that Winston Churchill knew in advance of a bombing raid on Coventry but chose to take no action. Ignoring the controversy over the assertion, this comment at the end is apropos "But even if Churchill had known ...


6

It is typical that US presidents enjoy a boost in approval ratings at the beginning of any national crisis. HW Bush saw a 35 point boost through the beginning of the Gulf War Clinton had no major crises in his administration, so his approval rating was comparatively steady (only spiking, ironically, during his impeachment) W Bush saw a 40 point spike in ...


7

It's difficult to find data to cover every single line on the ballot. However, in what I hope will be a reasonable proxy, I can point to a CNN exit poll from the 2016 election where voters were asked how they voted in US House elections. It showed that 90% of people who voted for a Democrat in their House district voted Clinton for President, while 87% of ...


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Because in the West, the media (and narratives) are tightly controlled by an elite few. I don't need to list all the examples of the so called 'conspiracy theories' from WMD to coordinated misinformation about Jeffrey Epstein etc, or the debunked Russian collaboration hoax about Trump. The owners of these media corporations literally sit down with senior ...


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Trump has never had better ratings - but that's not the whole story. This analysis from the CBC shows a fuller picture. Donald Trump has the highest approval ratings since the first few weeks of his presidency. a 47% approval rating However he has also had the lowest approval ratings of any president on average, never once having had an approval rate ...


0

I have now been through more than one week of "social distancing" in Toronto. And, Canada has not slowed that you would notice. Still a doubling time of pretty much 4 days. If we are going to slow this thing, we are going to need to be a lot more active about it. There is one simple thing that might have been done that would have made a difference. ...


23

According to US media, they're actually rising: Yet Trump’s approval ratings — an important gauge of his re-election chances a bit over seven months away — are staying strong, by some counts even reaching highs for his tenure. Though whether this has permanent effects in the long term and on Trump's popularity in the U.S. overall remains to be seen. A ...


2

No, you do not have to prove your citizenship, because the payment is not only for US citizens. It is for all US citizens or "resident aliens" for tax purposes, who have a Social Security Number, make less than the income threshold (it phases out at an AGI of between $75,000 and $99,000 for single filers and $150,000 and $198,000 for joint filers), and ...


100

I can't speak for Rebecca's judgement in interpreting those words of Trump, but for instance a NYT article says: “Our people want to return to work,” Mr. Trump declared Tuesday on Twitter, adding, “THE CURE CANNOT BE WORSE (by far) THAN THE PROBLEM!” In essence, he was raising an issue that economists have long grappled with: How can a society assess ...


-4

I'm sure it's because "Ukraine on Fire" is not a real documentary but a propaganda movie made to justify Putin's war against Ukraine. StopFake made a debunking of it: Russian Disinformation Film Made in the USA: StopFake with Marko Suprun (No. 250)


17

There's nothing to reconcile. Pro-life doesn't mean 'against (needless) death', it means anti-abortion. [The same is true for the opposite label: Pro-choice means in favor of legal access to abortion, not necessarily in favor of all individual choices (eg regarding assisted suicide or drug policies).] People supporting "Pro-life" can still support the ...


2

What determines whether the US House votes by voice, roll call, or unanimous consent? [Note that in the following a "recorded vote" vote is a roll call vote. The House only uses a roll call vote when the electronic system is unavailable.] Congressional Research Service, The Legislative Process on the House Floor: An Introduction, Updated May 20, 2019. ...


2

This was a voice vote, not a unanimous consent request. After a voice voice, any member can request a recorded vote, the yeas and nays, but there's a sort of pre-vote that happens next. The chair asks people to stand if they support the recorded vote. If 1/5 of a quorum (typically 44 people) stand then the recorded vote will happen. In this case, a few ...


8

In the most recent polls I found (and there are a helluva lot of polls on coronavirus in the US) from March 26: About seven-in-ten adults (71%) say that to address the coronavirus, it is necessary to require most businesses other than grocery stores or pharmacies to close. A larger share of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (81%) than ...


0

The House needs a quorum in order to pass something. That is, at least half of its members must be present. But the House presumes that there is a quorum until proven otherwise, so as long as no one objects, then the House can pass things by voice vote without showing that there is a quorum. Now, any member of the House can ask for a recorded vote and in ...


3

What criteria does the Senate use to decide whether or not a particular event is a genocide? If yes, where can I find such document? Elie Wiesel Genocide and Atrocities Prevention Act of 2018 (Public Law 115–441). In this Act— (1) the term ‘‘genocide’’ means an offense under subsection (a) of section 1091 of title 18, United States Code; ...


19

That story is from 2 days ago before it passed and is no longer a relevant point. The issue was that 4 republican senators stalled the bill to try to weaken unemployment benefits. Sanders made a counter-threat to stall the bill if they didn't withdraw their objections, to prevent the Senate from giving in to their objections. Sanders objected to an ...


2

First, allow me to me to dispute the comparison. GK Chesterton was a philosopher and an academic. Whatever one might think about his worldview, his opinions were carefully considered, thoughtfully composed, and thoroughly reasoned. Tucker Carlson is a media pundit, whose job it is to speak ex tempore on a wide variety of topics, often with an eye towards the ...


7

I just want to clarify from CDJB's otherwise correct answer that the "earn less than $99k" part is not the limitation on earned income. that part is: (d) Limitation Based On Adjusted Gross Income.—The amount of the credit allowed by subsection (a) (determined without regard to this subsection and subsection (f)) shall be reduced (but not below zero) by 5 ...


42

House Republican Whip Steve Scalise has given a press release which outlines the objections of Republicans to the bill, calling it a wishlist of "insane far-left policies". The objections in particular seem to relate to the amount of non-coronavirus related provisions within the bill. Republicans argue that these measures are unnecessary, and an abuse of the ...


3

The Department of Labor has a nifty Q&A page (Questions 2 and 3 in particular). In short, private sector corporations are considered as a single employer and thus count each employee within the company. If the employee count is greater than 500 the corporation in question is exempt from paid leave due to COVID-19 For what kind of coverage a smaller ...


24

No. The benefit is issued as a tax credit by amending the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. It applies to all US taxpayers subject to the definition of "Eligible Individual" in the CARES Act, which is as follows: “(d) Eligible Individual.—For purposes of this section, the term ‘eligible individual’ means any individual other than— “(1) any ...


3

"From the helicopter" there is now a more general claim (e.g. in the following McKinsey slide) that Western countries are trying to emulate China and/or South Korea's response: The devil might be in the details, of course. Getting to the details might be too involved/broad in a question like this, not specific to a pair of countries. There's for example a ...


-1

Section 5 1: Each House shall be the Judge of the Elections, Returns and Qualifications of its own Members, and a Majority of each shall constitute a Quorum to do Business https://constitutionus.com/ If more than half of a House is killed, it will not be able to establish a quorum. Under the normal meaning of "quorum", that would mean that it would not ...


1

It's an interesting question, and one that I hope we (Canada) will answer in the affirmative. Short term, in an emergency context like this, I think notion of privacy is turned around a bit: a sick person, unless at home, should have no expectation to keep their status private, quite the opposite. And, once recovered, that previously sick person could ...


1

No, because in the US (and Western democracies in general) patient privacy is very important and the kind of surveillance that the Chinese/South Korean/Singaporean model involves would be politically impossible. See source: There is something fascinating about reading Singapore’s government-supplied coronavirus outbreak information. The data is organized ...


8

The reason for the public outrage at Senator Burr and Loeffler's actions is that they continued to publicly support the party line that everything was under control and that Coronavirus was not a serious issue, while telling a very different story in private: The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee warned a small group of well-connected ...


11

The information that US intelligence services warned about a likely pandemic. It's one thing to know that there was one case in Washington or a lockdown in China, but another to know if an informed source such as US intelligence services consider it a threat. This Politico article goes into a bit more depths about this and the difficulty in actually ...


5

Never. Only in the early wars between France and England, but then it didn’t mind whether the enemies were in which territory and the border were unclear and the definition of the border was the cause of the war. How would they have been able to a) control a border that was the longest of the world b) of two countries that haven’t been fully explored ...


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