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-1

Please note that I'm not saying any of the justifications are good or have anything to do with anyone's other reasons for passing the law. This is just the justification publicly given by politicians in Georgia. Politicians in Georgia are justifying it by saying that "giveaways or gifts" to people waiting in line can influence how they vote (if I ...


6

The idea isn't restriction of voting, but restricting something called electioneering Each state has some form of restriction on political activities near polling places when voting is taking place. These restrictions usually include limiting the display of signs, handing out campaign literature or soliciting votes within a pre-determined distance (...


4

The day after the Georgia governor signed the law, PBS Newshour correspondent Lisa Desjardins interviewed a spokesperson for the Georgia Secretary of State's office, which oversees elections: Lisa Desjardins: To discuss the new law, Gabriel Sterling is the chief operating officer of the Georgia secretary of state's office. He's a Republican. They basically ...


1

The food and drink restriction is a reaction to well publicized splashy free-food events in voting lines during the 2020 elections. The bill is fixing a presumed "pizza loophole" in vote-buying. That's the formal justification: in the future free food might be used for vote-buying. Pizza to the Polls, started handing out slices during the 2016 ...


47

The point is to make voting harder and, therefore, to discourage it. By preventing volunteers from giving out food and water to voters, it makes the wait to vote (which can stretch to hours in some places) more unpleasant and discourages voters who are less motivated from waiting it out. This is in keeping with the long-standing push from the US right to ...


49

The rationalization stems from similar proclamations across multiple states against voter intimidation or vote-buying. Nobody should have the fact that they're stuck in a line be taken advantage-of by people trying to change who you're going to vote for. Georgia is already not allowed to have campaign posters, imagery, or even campaign t-shirts within 150 ...


18

What is the rationale behind this restriction? The rationale given in S.B. 202 is: (13) The sanctity of the precinct was also brought into sharp focus in 2020, with many groups approaching electors while they waited in line. Protecting electors from improper interference, political pressure, or intimidation while waiting in line to vote is of paramount ...


16

Well, to play devil's advocate here, von Spakovsky on the Heritage Foundation site says this: The polemical taunts are directed toward two of the bill’s provisions, one that extends the state’s decade-old ID requirement to absentee ballots, and another that attempts to prevent campaigns and party activists from trying to corruptly influence voters by ...


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