179

If we extrapolate from the historical record, it looks like the U.S. couldn't care less if there is a dictatorship or not in Venezuela or anywhere else. What the U.S. seems to care about strongly is that a regime does not intrude on their trade interests. Communist and socialist regimes have a tendency to nationalize industries and push land reform, thereby ...


92

The reason Venezuela's economy collapsed was its over-reliance on oil exports. In the last half of the 20th century, the Venezuelan economy focused on growing its oil industry, while relying on imports for most other products. This worked quite well while the oil prices were exceptionally high. It stopped working in 2014 when the global oil price plummeted ...


86

Wait up a minute. Who says Cuba didn't fail spectacularly? Miami (and Florida in general) have a huge Cuban population. Generally, because Cubans did anything they could to leave that country during the 90's - even to the extent of risking their lives trying to boat/raft/etc their way up north. Here is the story of a person who grew up in Cuba after the ...


75

I think the most useful framework to use to view US foreign policy is the one set out in Walter Russel Mead's Special Providence. The thesis is that there are essentially 4 schools of foreign policy, continually jockeying for getting their own way. Their primary motivations are roughly: promoting US business, protecting the US from foreign threats, ...


45

Guaido's proclamation is based in several articles of the Venezuelan Constitution and the opposition dismissing the results of the 2018 elections: The article 233 states that in case of "absence" of the President of Venezuela, new elections must be started and in the interim the Head of the Venezuelan Assembly would act as provisional president. Last ...


33

Venezuela's economy Venezuela is a communist planned economy with an authoritarian government. It is, therefore, an example of Socialism. Under Chavez and Maduro, Venezuela's economy became a planned economy based on oil production, with few other industries, its oil industry has been nationalized since 1973, and there were significant petrol subsidies for ...


33

Think back 50, 60, 70 years. There used to be something called the Cold War. Belief in their own system. Various free market economies are convinced that some from of Capitalism is right for people worldwide. Communists are convinced that Communism is right for people worldwide. Each wants to convince the rest of the world, and to save the people ...


27

If President Maduro publicly accepts international aid, what does that say about him and his administration? It broadcasts a clear signal of weakness and distress. It says that he has failed to properly manage his country and care for his people. It suggests that his socialist philosophy and policies are a failure. It suggests that his autocratic form of ...


25

Venezuela made a headlong rush into state ownership of businesses, at the direction of Chavez and Maduro. Consequently, the businesses saw their experienced executives replaced by friends of Chavez and Maduro, with more of an eye on loyalty than competence. As a direct result of this displacement of experienced people, not only was Venezuela hurt badly by ...


14

Statement by Ambassador Jerry Matjila, Permanent Representative of South Africa to the United Nations during the UN Security Council Meeting on Venezuela 26 January 2019 Mr President, In any country, political parties choose the provisions on which to conduct elections. Venezuela is no different and it held its Presidential elections on 20 May 2018, on the ...


14

South Africa clearly accepts the position put forth most forcefully by Russia and also supported by China that Maduro is quite simply the legitimate elected leader of Venezuela. In addition to the statement quoted in full by @RickSmith, a more detailed one is reported in an article in the Daily Maverick from March 2019. Guaido has not been elected president ...


13

Generally speaking external sanctions do not substantially affect a ruling elite directly. They can have a secondary effect e.g. oil sanctions reducing bribe opportunities, but these weren't a large factor with Cuba. For sanctions to cause the effective removal of a ruling group, a number of factors need to come together: enough of the population must be ...


11

US has already caused a lot of harm towards Cuban by imposing the indirect sanction rules that forbid any ship that docks in Cuba seaport from docking in any US port for at least 6 months. That destroyed a lot of Cuba trade, and this even strengthens Castro propaganda that USA going to enslave Cuban, again. (Though Obama administration has lifted the embargo ...


11

One cause of inflation is money supply growing faster than the rate of economic growth. In other words, they print more money (Bolivares Fuertes or BsF) than what they receive by selling oil (Dollars). This site has more information, unfortunately is only in spanish.


11

There is an underlying assumption in your question that I should highlight since it is a point of delicacy. The assumption is that National governments are concerned with the plight of citizens of another country, they are not. They are concerned with what is best from the point of view of their own citizens. That is not to say that appearances are ...


11

Let's say that nationalizations rather than welfare programs are closer to the hardcore idea of socialism. According to a 2012 Reuters article: In 14 years in office, Chavez has nationalized major swaths of the OPEC nation’s economy as part of a socialist agenda. In 2007, Chavez’s government took a majority stake in four oil projects in the vast ...


10

To go back in history some, Venezuela was turned into a largely socialist country by the immensely popular Hugo Chavez. It was under his regime that Venezuela flourished, largely due to oil revenues (when oil was around its all-time high). At the same time, he consolidated power “For years, President Chávez and his followers have been building a system in ...


10

Maduro IS accepting international aid. Just not from the US. Maduro is accepting aid from Russia, China and other international governments.There are several reasons why Maduro would not accept aid from America. First. America isn't delivering this aid to the Maduro government, instead it's delivering it to political factions allied with Juan Guaido, a man ...


10

Being a Socialist state is not a crime by itself. There are plenty of countries in today's world that can be called more or less socialist: consider Nordic model, informally known as Swedish Socialism. Dictatorships, on the other hand, tend to build Socialist or Communist economies because the Socialism assumes a bigger fraction of the nation's means of ...


9

Foreign aid, when all goes well, is a good thing. The usual metaphor is of neighbors helping neighbors get through a bad patch. International friendship, brotherhood of man, improving all of civilization... That said, foreign aid does not invariably go well: it might be incompetent: workers might be sent who are so poorly organized they make things ...


7

Invading another country costs a lot of: Human lives - and it's much higher in the invaded country, in modern war. Money Political capital if the war is not uber-popular at home (citation: Vietnam, Iraq). International goodwill unless you are in super-rare circumstances (like first Gulf War). As such, the cost/benefit ratio to USA of invading Venezuela is ...


7

This is clearly part of Maduro's response to the ongoing political and economic crisis in Venezuela. Beyond that, supporters and opponents of Maduro have different perspectives on what this is about. According to Al-Jazeera, Maduro himself told a crowd of supporters: "I convoke the original constituent power to achieve the peace needed by the Republic, ...


7

Voter turnout in Venezuela's 1998 presidential election was 63%, which is mildly-moderately higher than the United States (50.3% in 2000, 55.7% in 2004, 58.2% in 2008, 54.9% in 2012, an estimated 55.5% in 2016). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Ch%C3%A1vez#1998_election https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voter_turnout_in_the_United_States_presidential_elections ...


7

There has been a lot of straw manning here. You can find many other people straw manning what socialism is elsewhere too, and when someone corrects them, they say they are committing the no Scotsman fallacy - so be careful. Here are some corrections: "Venezuela is a communist planned economy with an authoritarian government. It is, therefore, an example of ...


7

The direct answer would be: Trade. If countries follow communist or socialist ideas, trading with them will be less free. Also it will disable American companies in investing in those countries. Which leads me to the main essence of this issue: The USA are in fact a Plutocracy, which means the government is exclusively made out of the rich people / ...


7

Yes, probably First, we need to establish an important distinction. Juan Guaido's popularity and Maduro's popularity do not sum to 100%. It's possible for Maduro to be highly unpopular (as he is; see below) and for Guaido to be equally unpopular (he isn't, but it's theoretically possible). It would even be possible for some people to like both Maduro and ...


6

Additionally to Alex's answer, the embargo is far less likely to work if it's ineffective in preventing other major powers from engaging with the country. Most notably, Cuba has been USSR's (and to a lesser extent, Russia's) client state. This included enormous amount of economic aid and trade. (source1, source2). For a really excellent overview, see "...


6

This article tries to cover the reasons you are looking for: non-transparent elections: Nicolás Maduro won the presidential election by a small margin compared with the number of invalid votes. This dubious outcome led opposition leaders to request an audit of the vote. The audit took place, but not under the conditions the opposition demanded....


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