New answers tagged

1

To supplement the answer with details on Pennsylvania, the Republicans who controlled the legislature there tried to bargain with the Democratic governor over pre-canvassing (pre-counting) in exchange for what they saw as necessary changes in the law, like relaxing residency restrictions on poll watchers and "banning mail drop boxes". These ...


3

In past elections, mail-in ballots were an afterthought for most states. There weren't that many of them, so you could normally tell what the election results were before even counting them. Even if you did need to count them in order to find out the result of an election, counting them was pretty quick because there weren't very many. Therefore pre-...


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One reason is the scenario of a person casting a mail-in and then coming in and casting a vote in person. You don't want that double-counted. It's easier to set aside a ballot if the person is in the system as having cast a vote earlier in the day, at the time of opening the ballot than going back and trying to retrieve that ballot from somewhere, wherever ...


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Media outlets either get the information from state and local election officials, or from other media outlets relying on those sources.


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The vote count is taken from the tally, after it is reported (e.g. at the precinct level). As the New York Times wrote about the first results being skewed: But the initial skew in a state’s results may last only a short while, and it will be influenced by which counties or precincts in the state are the fastest to report, said Charles Stewart III, an ...


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tl;dr: To answer why not all states pre-count votes, this answer lays out what voting processes that do enable pre-counting have to give up and what they gain, compared with those that don't have pre-counting. The conclusion is that both approaches have their own advantages, neither is clearly better, and thus both approaches make sense. In theory*, there ...


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This is usually to avoid the leaking of any partial vote tallies before the election, which might have the effect of unfairly encouraging or discouraging turnout of voters favoring one candidate or another.


17

Does a mail-in ballot stay valid if the voter died between mailing it validly and the election date? For some states, yes. For others, no. What If an Absentee Voter Dies Before Election Day?, October 20, 2020 What happens when an eligible voter casts an absentee ballot and then passes away before Election Day? This question comes up more and more, as ...


11

I tracked down the following explanation in a Washington Post article: Why do so many more Democrats than Republicans plan to vote by mail? One clear explanation of the growing gap has been well documented: Partisans often take cues from their party’s elites, as scholarship has long found. When Trump criticizes voting by mail, as he frequently does, ...


0

There are several good reasons to allow postal voting, beyond the convenience of the voters who don't have to stand in line on election day. One is to allow voters who are out of the state on election day to cast their vote. Military deployed overseas, among others. Another is to allow the sick to cast their vote. The latter can come up quite unexpectedly, ...


17

It's pretty simple, actually: Election day is "the Tuesday next after the first Monday in the month of November", and people have the right to cast their votes up to the closing of polls on that day. Now, this differs based on State law. Some states do require ballots to be received by Election day, while others only require them to be postmarked ...


2

On which legal basis is this even possible? The situation in Pennsylvania is questionable. The Pennsylvania legislature passed a law in 2019 permitting mail-in voting and requiring that those ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in order to be counted. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court later ruled that, given the extraordinary circumstances ...


6

Every state in the US has their own election law. Those laws define the rules for processing mail-in votes, under which conditions a vote is considered valid and how long the counting takes place. As long as those state laws aren't violated, there is little way to challenge those elections in a state-level court of law. However, it would be possible to ...


2

In some locales, you are allowed to vote in person even if you mailed a ballot in. (And even where this isn't officially permitted, a voter may show up in person to vote and dispute that they voted by mail even though a mailed ballot in their name was received.1) In such cases, the mailed ballot needs to be found and removed from the count. That's only ...


13

That depends on the laws in each state. In some states mail in ballots can be counted as they come in but in others they can't be counted until the polls close. I have included a couple of states for reference but the article lists what is expected in all 50 states and the District of Columbia https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/election-results-timing/ ...


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