109

They are several reasons at play as to why poor people don't vote. Voter ID laws and registering to vote The Government Accountability Office found in this report, that in most state it costs between $5 - $60 to obtain a vote ID, alternate ID like a passport or driving license also cost money to obtain, and people who don't travel or don't drive may not ...


73

"They had things—levels of voting that, if you ever agreed to it, you'd never have a Republican elected in this country again." Donald Trump on Fox and Friends “Just what America needs, another paid holiday and a bunch of government workers being paid to go out and work ... [on Democratic] campaigns,” he snarked on the Senate floor. “This is the ...


68

tl;dr- People who made less than $15,000/yr were 30% less likely to vote because a significant portion of that segment of the population was disaffected. Disaffected people tend to lack an interest in both finance and politics, as shown by Pew Research studies cited below. Update: Added a significant part to the start of this answer to clarify the question....


55

Rural voters aren't afraid to go to the polls to keep a conservative state supreme court justice in power. The April 2020 ballot does include the U.S. presidential primary, but that will have little effect on state politics. After I first posted this answer, the New York Times echoed many of the points I make below, starting with: Former Vice President ...


53

Republicans prevented this change because at the core it is beneficial to their electoral prospects. There are many layers to fully understanding this issue, but to address it in brief I think a few facts are sufficient. One, the proportion of Republican voters is larger in rural areas than urban areas, see here. The dangers of COVID-19 are more ...


43

While this is older and from 1980 here is Paul Weyrich coming out and saying more people voting is bad: Now many of our Christians have what I call the goo-goo syndrome — good government. They want everybody to vote. I don't want everybody to vote. Elections are not won by a majority of people, they never have been from the beginning of our country and they ...


39

The main point of objection by the boycotters is that the referendum essentially does not accomplish anything. It is not legally binding and would not significantly advance the movement for statehood or independence; therefore, opponents feel that boycotting it emphasizes its ineffectiveness. Part of the rationale for the opposition parties is that Congress ...


35

Yes, Article 81 of the Macedonian constitution (found here in Macedonian, or here in English) provides that the successful candidate in a Presidential election is elected by majority vote, provided that more than 40% of registered voters participate. This used to be 50%, but was altered by the 31st amendment in 2009 to 40%. The provision in full: A ...


27

In the 2012 Obama vs Romney presidential election, Pennsylvania state House Republican leader Mike Turzai admitted openly that the whole purpose of a voter ID-law was to suppress Democratic votes and win the state for Mitt Romney. In listing the accomplishments of the state House and Senate GOP for the partisan crowd, Mr. Turzai pointed to the new ...


24

The Russian Federation had minimum turnout requirements for presidential and Duma (parliamentary) elections until 2007, but they've since abolished the rule: Since 2007 the minimum turnout of 50 % for presidential and 25 % for Duma of the registered electorate was abolished. (Source: European Parliament) A number of countries in Europe and elsewhere ...


21

A minimum turnout is commonly used for referendums. See Referendums by country on Wikipedia, which has an entire column on minimum turnout. Sometimes this minimum is formulated as purely a minimum turnout, and sometimes as a minimum fraction of total electorate which must vote for a measure for it to pass. For example, in Romania a referendum is valid if ...


20

Yes.... and no. There is a tendency to pander to voters. Not "voters" as in eligible voters, but voters as in more likely voters. In the United States, younger voters vote the least, as a percentage of those eligible to vote. One study/group, called the "Election Project," run out of University of Florida, tracks voter turnout demographics. Breaking ...


20

It is not just the presidential primary being held today, but also a number of elections to local government. The Wisconsin GOP argued that it is essential to ensure that the positions in local government are filled so that important decisions can be made at a local level during the coronavirus crisis. They also note that a million voters requested ...


19

Disenfranchisement is a pretty rare political tactic on either the left or the right outside the United States, which has close to the lowest voter turnout rates among places that have genuine democratic elections. Iran For example, even Iran has higher voter turnout than the United States. In Iran, the ruling faction tends to manipulate elections (which ...


15

This effect has been fairly well researched, for example by Schaffner, Streb, & Wright in their 2001 paper Teams Without Uniforms: The Nonpartisan Ballot in State and Local Elections in Political Research Quarterly. They examine a number of US elections, including those in the city of Asheville, North Carolina as it switched from partisan to nonpartisan ...


13

Let's look at the timeline Evers proposed an all-mail-in election towards the end of March Republicans objected, but they did have reasons “Governor Evers just proposed procuring, printing, verifying and mandating the mailing of millions of ballots within 10 days,” Fitzgerald said in a statement. “Even he knows that’s not logistically feasible. The ...


11

It's about not expanding vote by email, same day registration, etc. to make it easier to vote. For instance, blue collar voters can't always show up at voting stations due to not having free time -- bosses don't always allow them to take an hour off, and voting stations are sometimes set up in such a way that an hour isn't enough anyway. The result is ...


10

Speaking nationally, Democrats currently have a 6%-7% advantage over Republicans in terms of voter representation. In fact, Democrats have a lead among every demographic group except white males without a college education. However, Democratic voters tend to be clustered in urban and suburban areas, which attenuates their voting power somewhat and leaves ...


9

Yes, lots of it. For example, Republicans are generally opposed to felon voting. Felons are obviously people. They do this entirely in the open, and there is no secret about it. The Atlantic National Review Here is another category of examples. Republicans are generally opposed to non-US-citizens voting. Non-US-citizens are obviously people. Again, it's ...


8

This answer lists some of the statistics and metrics used to measure political participation. First, let's define political participation: Conventional participation: Activities that we expect of good citizens. For most people, participation occurs every few years at election time. People strongly committed to politics are more likely to participate on a ...


8

More people did not really support either candidate this time around. This is evidenced by the fact that the number of empty ballots was higher in this election, where other's with the same inclination probably just stayed home on a dreary day in France.


8

At first sight, I agree it looks a little puzzling, but consider that the Students were the only group that substantially preferred Labour ( 64% to 19% ), and there are not so many of them ( 3,092 students vs. 12,475 retired, weighted figures ), and their turnout was lower ( 67% to 80% retired ). Of the other groups, the Labour lead is relatively small ( 45%...


6

First, let's point out that this kind of 'poll watching' is not a new idea at all. Back in 1981, the Republican National Convention paid armed, off-duty police officers to surveil polling stations in districts with a large black and hispanic population, calling themselves the National Ballot Security Task Force. They were later sued by New Jersey and ...


6

Yes. Such a requirement is often called a quorum. I haven't heard of any in public elections (although other posters mentioned a few examples), but it is extremely common in smaller voting bodies, anything from Congressional Committees (not sure about House or Senate itself), corporate shareholder meetings down to homeowner's associations. The quorum rules ...


5

This article mentions several possibilities (changing demographics, elimination of fraud, etc.) but ends up with the 1840-1900 period being a period of particularly high partisanship. For example, in 1858, there were no claims of media neutrality. There were Lincoln papers and Douglas papers. Afterwards, the states settled into Republican and Democrat ...


5

This question appears a bit too broad, so my answer will be brief since I don't want to get into the details of each possible interpretation of "level of dissatisfaction with the political situation". Basically if "level of dissatisfaction with the political situation" means "legitimacy deficit", or "dissatisfaction with ...


5

Establishing a causal relationship is hard. There are established correlations between Income and turnout (in 2008 41% of those earning $10000 or less voted, compared with 78% of those earning $150000 or more) Ethnicity and turnout (in 2008 65% of "non-hispanic white" people voted, compared with 32% of "Hispanic" people.) Age and turnout Income and ...


5

Answer: A good measure (metric) for this will have to be statistical, but simple statistics like "average wait time" turn out misleading rather than meaningful. A better metric might be the percentage of voters who have to wait longer than some specified "target" wait time . The measure can be thought of as a pass/failure rate against a quality-of-...


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