51

The two cases mentioned in the linked podcast are those of Crystal Mason and Rosa Maria Ortega, who were both convicted of voter fraud under different circumstances. I'm going to firstly focus on the case of Crystal Mason, who was convicted after voting in the 2016 presidential election whilst ineligible to vote. She was able to be identified and charged ...


21

Does Spider-Man meet the requirements to register? According to the New York Board of Elections site, here is the criteria to register to vote: Be a United States citizen The application form simply asks you to check Yes or No and does not require any accompanying documentation. So since Peter Parker is a United States citizen, he can truthfully check this ...


14

You do not. If you have not moved since you last voted, then you can simply return to the precinct where you voted in the presidential election on midterm election day to cast your vote. The Wiki-how on voter registration specifies: You only need to register again if you change your address or name, or if you would like to switch political party ...


12

According to Wikipedia, some countries that do register citizens for voting without them having to explicitly ask for it are: Chile Czech Republic Denmark Finland Germany Iceland Israel Italy Mexico Norway Peru South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland Taiwan Commenters also pointed out these additional examples: The Netherlands Poland Portugal Usually voter ...


9

Can a US citizen who has never lived in the US, register for voting in a midterm election? Maybe. Most states will allow such a person to vote in a federal election if the person had a parent whose last domicile in the US was in that state, or who was last registered to vote in that state. See the Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) page on voters ...


7

Let's say California decides to go further and passes a law that openly allows non-citizen residents to vote in California elections [...] It appears to run afoul of Federal law Depends on what you mean by "California elections". There is currently a federal law against non-citizens voting in an election for a federal office (president/vice president, ...


6

Vote.gov offers information on how to register to vote. On that page, you choose your state and you can register online. If you don't need to register again, that should be stated on the state-specific site. For example on the Arizona site, it says: Use EZ Voter registration to: Register to vote for the first time Update your address, political party ...


6

14% - 2012 House Elections The best source of information on US voting behavior is definitely the American National Election Survey. A single slice of their data easily captures hundreds of variables. They utilize a weighted sampling design and panel studies to comprehensively cover the public. What I'm saying is - it's a good study. The 2016 data isn't ...


6

The only registration rolls that I can speak to contain name, addresses, voting precinct, date of birth, sometimes drivers license numbers, original registration and re-registration date, party affiliation, complete voting history for the past 5 years,including what party primary the voter voted in. That said, My impression is that the concern is not ...


5

If you were eligible to vote for the general election and you voted you will definitely not need to re-register for the special election. Some states may expire your registration if you do not vote for multiple election cycles. I'm guessing you were referring to Senator Sessions from Alabama; I was not able to find any information on voter registration ...


5

What could be done to US states that openly allow non-citizens to vote? I notice that the other "answers" don't actually address this, which is presumably the question at hand. Not which law is supreme or whether it runs afoul of federal law. As I understand it, the question is what can be done if California or another state ignores binding law in terms ...


5

You gain nothing if you vote where your vote counts most, and the candidate you vote for doesn't get elected. Probably. Is the predicted outcome in one of your countries particularly close? Your vote might help to make the difference. Are there "first past the fencepost" or "threshold" voting systems that would make your vote likely to be irrelevant? Do you ...


5

It's somewhat unusual but certainly not unique. Wikipedia maintains a list of examples on voter identification laws. I'll quote a bit from that. I'll not cite those that require ID because most do. I will cite some exceptions, and as you can see the rules vary a lot on a case by case basis. Countries not requiring some form of physical ID or specific ...


5

In Texas, voter registration is done on a paper form and requires a "wet signature" (i.e., the voter must physically sign the piece of paper - there is no online option). The voter registration card includes this information: Qualifications: You must register to vote in the county in which you reside You must be a citizen of the United States ...


4

"Do Not Call" registry The "Do Not Call" registry has nothing to do with citizenship or voting. There are no citizenship questions asked to register. You essentially only have to input the telephone number that you want on the registry. The purpose is solely to prevent unsolicited phone calls, especially robo calls. Unlisted numbers In the olden days ...


4

Germany Since all residents must register with the municipal authorities, they know which residents are citizens. Before each election, one gets a postcard with a notification about the date and the place of one's polling station, plus instructions how to request absentee ballots. There are some scenarios like citizens living abroad where special forms would ...


4

You can normally register to vote immediately upon moving home. However, there are a couple of restrictions under Sections 4 and 5 of the Representation of the People Act, 1983: If you are moving to Northern Ireland from elsewhere, you must wait for three months before registering. (If you're moving within Northern Ireland, this does not apply.) If you ...


4

Compared to other democracies, the US has a very limited choice during the actual election. Yes, one can vote for a third party candidate, but think about the fact that the generic term third party exists in the political discourse. This is compensated by the fact that the candidate selection of the two big parties is very open. In most other countries, ...


4

TL;DR - People are asked for party affiliation so that they can vote in the primaries for the candidate that they want. Party affiliation doesn't necessarily reflect voting habits in the general election. You can't find out which party an individual voted for. You can find out what party they are registered with. The registration really only matters for ...


4

In Massachusetts (as in many other states) there are two stages to the election, a primary election, in which the parties choose their candidates, and a general election, in which the candidates from the parties compete for the post of Governor. As a registered Republican, you would be able to vote in the Republican Primary and in the General. In the ...


4

The California Secretary of State publishes detailed voter registration data. While it's not updated daily (I haven't seen any such data), it's still possible to draw trends in voter registration.


3

If I am changing the state I am registered to vote in, do I need to somehow “unregister” in my old state? No. All you need to do is register in the new state. The old state is supposed to figure it out, possibly by being notified by the new state. This is also true if you switch counties within a state, as it is actually the counties that track the ...


3

There is one scenario under which you must re-register. In many jurisdictions, you are allowed to cast a ballot in a presidential election if you are registered to vote in the state, even if it is not at your current address or precinct. You are then not permitted to vote on other races. In midterm elections, this protection will not apply. So if you are ...


3

This is answered constitutionally by Article 6 clause 2 of the constitution. ... the Laws of the United States...shall be the supreme Law of the Land. In case of a positive law that allows non-citzens to vote, the Californian law would be "trumped" (no pun intended) by Federal law. Federal agencies may have difficulty enforcing a law without the support ...


3

Belgium Intuitively, countries where voting is mandatory would be likely to automatically register eligible citizens. This turns out to be true for Belgium. According to the official Federal Office of Elections website, Les Belges inscrits dans les registres de la population d'une commune belge ne doivent pas s'inscrire pour les élections. Ils sont ...


3

Some states in the United States do something like this. According to the Brennan Center, 16 states (plus the District of Columbia) currently or will soon automatically register citizens to vote (on an opt-out basis) when they interact with government agencies, generally the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) where people register their cars and get and ...


3

For the purposes of voting, does adding a phone number (or cell number) to the Do Not Call registry mean that it is unlisted? No. As explained in the other answer, these are completely different things. A listed number can be on the do not call registry, or not, and the same is true of an unlisted number.


3

There are no requirements in the state of Pennsylvania as to what party you can join nor the reasons why you join. You can admit your reasoning freely. You can change your party as often as you want, but not less than thirty days before an election in which you want the changed registration to apply. So today (May 6th of 2019) is too late to change your ...


2

There are probably no known "neutral" examples of this. I'm basing this on the fact that proponents of such systems (sometimes called epistocracy) don't bring any (good) examples of prior actual voting tests. They propose they these tests should be like citizenship tests etc., e.g. Jason Brennan writes: Or, an epistocracy might allow every citizen ...


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