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3

In the specific case of a one-law referendum, which is what the question was asking about, what would be the purpose? Let's pick a subject that will be polarizing and motivate people strongly, abortion for example. Now we have a referendum to allow it (Ireland did that recently, IIRC). Could be a referendum to forbid it, doesn't matter. What does it mean ...


2

This answer is in the same vein as the one by CDJB, but explained a little differently. Consider the following voting system: There is a referendum, and everyone who votes gets to choose two things. Whether they vote "for" or "against." How much their vote is worth, or how much "weight" it has, on a scale of 1 to 100. Then, ...


24

Because the system highly incentivises strategic voting. The voting system you describe is more commonly known as score voting, although it has plenty of other names. It's been used before in the USA - the example given by Wikipedia is the election of officers in the Utah Green Party rather than on a referendum or legislative proposal - this used a ballot as ...


3

The answer is no, because your votes aren't the main factor. This is basically just a modern version of Jim Crow literacy tests though this has a lot more potential for abuse. Those who are in power could just change the outcome of the tests, so that an outcome they wanted occurs. The only useful application for a system like this is when you want to have ...


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