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4

Actually Indonesia has a larger voter population than Brazil (the accepted answer). For the 2019 election On 5 September 2018, the KPU announced there were 187 million registered voters – 185,732,093 in Indonesia and 2,049,791 voting abroad. The Indonesian president is directly elected albeit in a two-round system (like Brazil), but candidates need the ...


1

It will come down to how popular your least preferred candidate is in the rest of the constituency. If you think they are likely to get to a full quota in the first couple of counts, then expressing further preferences will do little to stop it, as they will already have been elected by the time your original preferences will have been exhausted. If you ...


5

Morally, I agree with the message of the other current answers that in the absence of more information on the intentions of your fellow voters, it is often worth honestly stating your full ordering of preferences for candidates under STV. However it is worth noting that because the order in which candidates are eliminated influences the final result, the ...


5

If you intend to do your utmost to ensure that this candidate does not get elected, it would be wise to rank every other candidate higher than them. It is possible to think of an STV election as a series of voting rounds as candidates are eliminated and/or win seats. If the final "voting round" is between your two least favourite candidates (that is, ...


5

Assuming you are talking about the Irish General Elections that are coming up (seeing your account states you are Irish) That works as follows: The 160 members of Dáil Éireann will be elected by single transferable vote (STV) from 39 constituencies, each returning between three and five TDs (Dáil deputies). Voters complete a paper ballot, numbering ...


4

Many constitutions of representative democracies or republics state that elected representatives only have to answer to their own conscience. They are supposed to have no duty to either their constituents nor to their party. But in the real world, any representatives who were elected through party lists have strong incentives to stay loyal to their party ...


2

You don't seem aware that senators are two per state (fixed in the constitution), regardless of the state population. That's often a lighting rod of non-proportional criticism; see e.g. the first article linked in What's (roughly) the smallest percentage of the US population that through its Senators has successfully blocked a piece of legislation? ...


2

All states are currently using a first-past-the-post system of voting for national elections and essentially majoritarian. Two states, Nebraska ans Maine, for presidential elections use per-district results for choosing electors and award 2 more to the winner of the state-wide popular vote. All other states use a winner-take-all method of assigning electors ...


0

while the results can approximate proportional, the fact that you elect specific candidates in each district makes it majoritarian. True proportional allocates a number of seats to each party at an aggregate level, then uses some other mechanism for the members of the party to be chosen to take those seats.


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