New answers tagged

1

Looking at the precinct-level data provided by the D.C. Board of Elections, we can find the Republican candidate vote share in the 2012 & 2016 presidential elections. With a bit of manipulation, we can obtain a few statistics about the distributions. 2012 Minimum: 0.19% (Precinct 100) 2.5th percentile: 0.35% Lower quartile: 1.26% Median: 3.36% Upper ...


6

How is the American voting system? Is the voting secret or open? Secret. Do people need to identify themselves as belonging to a particular party? Going further, am I allowed to vote for Republicans if I "belong" to Democrats. Why did Kamala Harris and Tulsi Gabbard debate each other even though they belong to same party? Voters can register as ...


38

France allowed mail-in voting from 1958 to 1975. It was replaced by proxy voting by law 75-1239 in December 1975. The reasons given at the time to get rid of mail-in voting are the same reasons not to reintroduce it today, namely, that it can and did permit significant fraud. Electoral fraud is difficult to quantify, mostly because all that can be reliably ...


3

From a somewhat more detailed article on France 24: Postal voting [...] has been abolished in France since 1975 "because it lent itself to manipulation", said [Interior Minister Christophe] Castaner. However, it also remains an option for French citizens abroad during legislative elections. So "manipulation" seems to be the reason ...


2

Yes. It depends on whether a gap of <1 percentage points in vote share is "significant". By two-party vote share (not margin): 1960: 0.1 percentage points more Republican than nation 1972: 0.7 percentage points more Republican than nation No other state shares such a distinction, unless you count DC as a state.


3

It will depend on where you are voting, because laws about how elections are run are set at the state level, and, as another answer points out, they are actually carried out at the local level. This means there is no single answer to this question that is true for all Americans. This guide from Slate lists how to vote and, and how to confirm whether your ...


2

Yes, it has happened that some US votes have not been tabulated, and where this is known, not even retabulated. For example, consider the 11/22/2000 "Brooks Brothers Riot", that many believe had, (one way or another), a decisive effect on the 2000 US Presidential Election, wherein a small organized horde of posturing, domineering, middle-age ...


3

According to election materials I've seen in a number of jurisdictions, votes for write-in candidates will only be tabulated for if the candidates are officially registered. Registering as a write-in candidate doesn't require any demonstration that one could expect to receive any particular number of votes, but registration requirements among other things ...


-1

It's actually routine for ballots to not be counted. Absentee ballots are typically only a small percentage of the total vote, if it's impossible for the ballots to change the outcome they don't count them. Given the comments, let me expand upon this: If any item on the ballot could possibly be decided by the absentee ballots they have to be counted. It ...


5

Here is no nice & simple universal answer to this Question. Firstly, it is highly dependent on the jurisdiction, as well as the reason for the "rejection". Take a simple example, the voter returns the ballot in time to be counted but does not place the ballot in the security or authentication envelope, nor has a identification on a outer ...


12

Ballots can certainly be lost or delayed in the mail. Ballots can be delivered successfully but rejected because the signature didn't match what the state had on file. Rarely, ballots can also be misplaced. Ballots can also be rejected because of issues with the postmark but presumably not if you're looking to see whether your ballot was accepted prior to ...


2

As a rule, it is useful to clarify what we are actually talking about before we start talking about it. With that point in mind... IQ tests measure the ability to solve certain kinds of abstract puzzles. They were originally popularized by the military and heavy industry — both of which had influxes of under-educated workers/soldiers — to separate out those ...


2

This is a frame challenge answer. In my opinion question is invalid because it mixes incompatible assumptions. The very notion of "rational voter" by definition precludes the very possibility of diverging IQ. Within political and economical sciences "rational" assumes having perfect knowledge of situation and being able to perfectly make ...


0

The 2012 results are here. Full results by precinct (there are 143 precincts) are here. The approximate breakdown by ward is shown here: The 2016 results are here. Full results by precinct (there are 143 precincts) are here. The approximate breakdown by ward is shown here: You can use this data to figure it out yourself if you are so inclined.


4

It is hard to imagine any specific policy which would directly target people with low IQ. The only ones I could think of are: Eugenics, as mentioned in the question, but that would be highly unethical Hiring criteria in the public sector (as many standardized hiring tests are often just IQ tests, this is actually one of the few areas of life where IQ scores ...


14

Other answers about "testing" the system are close to the mark IMO; but based on my previous observation of Trump's MO: this is not about the election; this is about the campaign. Trump has many times in the past tried to sell a narrative of the American left - the Dems themselves, news media that supports them, Twitterati, bloggers, academics, etc....


4

Trump desires to ensure ballot integrity in a key electoral state. North Carolina is a swing state, so where majors parties win by thin margins, and a few uncounted votes can mean victory or defeat. Another interpretation of Trump's comment is to not actually vote twice, but to verify the vote was cast by trying to vote and being rejected to test the system. ...


3

It could potentially give a line of attack. "Why are Democrats making a big deal of what I said, they said that vote by mail is fine and would detect and fix any problems. They must know how easy fraud can happen!" At this point in the race, there is every indication that Biden is significantly ahead and likely to win absent any changes. He is ...


46

This is the modern mass-media era. Trump may have been speaking in North Carolina, but he — like any other national level candidate — is aware that he is speaking to the nation as a whole. Note that after he made this statement — as the article points out — he followed it with a tweet on the same subject, explicitly aimed at a national audience. If I were to ...


6

I'm not aware that there is any significance to making this suggestion to North Carolina voters. The methods to check for duplicate voting attempts appear to be fairly uniform as it applies to voting twice (once by mail, followed by another attempt in person). This video of the full exchange between Trump and a local broadcaster Link is useful to consider, ...


37

As the BBC article explains, Trump frequently makes baseless allegations that the election system is prone to fraud. The only thing unusual about this most recent remark is that he's encouraging his own supporters to commit voter fraud. He happened to be in North Carolina when he made these remarks, and it is relevant to know that Trump and Biden are neck-...


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