65

The State Counsellor of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, has a Nobel peace prize and there are calls for some of her military leaders to be prosecuted for war crimes. She herself might also be complicit. According to Channel 4 reporting (Channel 4's interview with Professor Yanghee Lee, who is the UN Special Envoy, is available via that link): The United ...


59

I'm sure there's more, but here are the ones that I can remember: Henry Kissinger He served as the U.S. Secretary of State during both the Nixon and Ford administrations and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1973. He has been accused of committing the following war crime: Source Violating Art. 25 of Hague IV for his role in the secret American bombings in ...


26

The closest I can think of is Henry Kissinger. He has accused by many of war crimes, with a judge in Argentina considering him a 'defendant or suspect'.


16

Yes, Ronald Reagan, President at the time said I am saddened to report that it appears that in a proper defensive action by the U.S.S. Vincennes this morning in the Persian Gulf an Iranian airliner was shot down over the Strait of Hormuz. This is a terrible human tragedy. Our sympathy and condolences go out to the passengers, crew, and their families. The ...


12

Here's my best shot at answering your question: Since the bombing was a military act carried out during wartime, it's highly unlikely that any legal action could have been taken. Nuclear bombs were a brand new weapon, and thus there were no existing rules regarding their use. But legal hypotheticals aside, the reality is that public opinion was firmly ...


10

Bernie Sanders wanted to in 1974, but later retracted his position, urging instead for funding cuts and reining it in. During the 2016 Democratic Presidential Primary, Hillary Clinton and surrogates attacked this old position for its radicalism. From what I can find online, no politicians currently serving advocate the termination of the CIA.


9

ISIS is not a member of the ICC, therefore it can't appeal to it. Intentionally killing journalists would be a war crime. However, if journalists are killed by an attack aimed at a legitimate target, it is not (otherwise armies would include journalists in every fighting unit).


8

Actually NO! According to wiki : The event triggered an intense international controversy, with Iran condemning the U.S. attack as a "barbaric act." In mid-July 1988, Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati asked the United Nations Security Council to condemn the United States saying the U.S. attack "could not have been a mistake" ...


8

Why is there no universal standard procedure for military intervention when it comes to genocide ? Actually, there is. The United Nations has a specific international law for Genocide called the "UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide". This international law binds all signatories and requires them to intervene in genocide incidents... ...


7

Ron Paul spoke about the Gulf of Tonkin incident and referred to it as a metaphor for a ruse to start a war with Iran while speaking to Congress about the perils of the Iraq war. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fRB3UBz1KEQ


7

Her father was a diplomat and she may be able to claim immunity. Her father may have committed criminal conspiracy, but he is dead and can't be prosecuted for anything. Nayirah is living in Kuwait. It is generally impossible to try foreign citizens living abroad. The testimony was not given under oath, so perjury cannot apply. There are laws of "filing ...


4

In a state where rule of law prevails, the only forum which has the authority to judge if a certain action was legal or illegal is a criminal court.


4

For the ICC to consider a case it would have to be satisfied: That a crime had been committed that it was competent to judicate on. Murder is such a crime. If a civilian had been targeted by coalition soldiers that would be a murder and so would be within the remit of the court. That the crime occured in a country that was a signatory to the ICC, or the ...


3

The countries where the government is dependent on support of the populace don't do it because their populace doesn't demand it. Homo Sapiens didn't evolve to be altruistic to those outside one's tribe (naturally, 150 people closest to you; but you can socially hack that to enlarge the group - see Crusades being sold to people as "Fellow Christians suffering"...


2

Why is there no universal standard procedure for military intervention when it comes to genocide ? What you are talking about is often called "Humanitarian Intervention" and is a very complex field of study. It has a varied history, but to cut a long story short what you have to remember is that for it to be just, it should really be multilateral - that ...


2

There are very few international courts that can hear criminal cases, and every single one of them has extremely strict limits on what sorts of things it can handle. This is because unlike sovereign states, international bodies have no inherent authority to enact criminal laws, to arrest people, or to imprison people. The only authority they have comes from ...


2

What legal accountability, if any, was available regarding the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki around that time? None. Who could request an investigation into the incident? Could people who weren't US citizens request that the US government or other body investigate the incident? Would those investigating the incident be free to ...


1

Yes, from The Guardian: Dutch arms trafficker to Liberia given war crimes conviction Guus Kouwenhoven convicted of selling weapons to ex-president Charles Taylor during wars that involved mass atrocities An international timber trader who used his business as cover for smuggling weapons into West Africa in defiance of a UN arms embargo has been sentenced to ...


1

Are reports of Human Rights Watch reviewed by external authorities before they are published? They probably try, but it's often not possible to determine if testimony is authentic or not. The New York Times has an article in which the founder of Human Rights Watch, R.L. Bernstein, explains the difficulty: But how does Human Rights Watch know that these ...


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