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5

No, negotiation requires the authority of the United States. The Logan Act states: Any citizen of the United States, wherever he may be, who, without authority of the United States, directly or indirectly commences or carries on any correspondence or intercourse with any foreign government or any officer or agent thereof, with intent to influence the ...


12

TL;DR: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Afghanistan Every few decades since 1500 B.C. some great military nation tries to take over Afghanistan and loses. India, Mongolia, China, Middle East, Britain (3 times), Russia and now the US. The trick for when the aliens invade is get them to start with Afghanistan. This might be a flippant answer but they ...


0

They are not the same Taliban. In all these years many of the attacks against NATO troops that were attributed to the Taliban by the media were actually carried out by local rebel groups. Different insurgencies different militia groups some funded by Pakistan some seeking shelter from the Pakistani army, criminal organisations funded by the opium trade, they ...


67

TL;DR: The Taliban has lasted for so long because it has a durable organizational structure and safe haven in Pakistan. Undercutting the Taliban is more complicated than rooting out its network of poppy cultivation. Yes, the sudden removal of its drug funds would likely hurt the group, but the organizational structures, recruitment networks, and other ...


5

The numbers need to be taken into perspective. To cite a 2020 BBC article about withdrawals: In Iraq, the number of US troops will be cut by 500 to 2,500, while the number of service personnel in Afghanistan will fall from 4,500 to about 2,500. So at most we are talking 4500 soldiers, hardly anything to influence inner politics. You may have other ...


58

The Taliban are not just a drug-running organization, not even predominantly a drug-running organization. The US-led coalition invaded Afghanistan because the Afghan government at the time sheltered terrorists. For all the cost of the longest war, it never did spend enough effort to really reconstruct Afghanistan. Instead it went to Iraq, and elsewhere. The ...


0

The legislative branch is in charge of deciding the rules. The executive branch is, as the name says, in charge of executing those rules. If Congress wishes to end a war, they can simply pass a bill doing so. This would be subject to the president's veto power, so if the president is determined to continue the war, Congress would need 2/3 majority in both ...


12

There's quite a lot of verbiage about POTUS war powers, but it's otherwise unclear exactly how Congress stops a war, even if is the one that has to declare it. If it was considered urgent enough that Matt's defunding solution would be too slow, Congress could impeach the President, though that would be stretching the definition of high crimes and ...


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Congress controls funding for the military. In an extreme situation, Congress could choose to defund the military budget entirely. In practice, this will probably never happen because members of Congress have numerous incentives to keep the military funded.


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