84

Technically speaking, an oligarch is a member of an oligarchy: a system in which political governance is given to a cadre of wealthy, propertied individuals in society. The archetypal example is the Republic of Venice, which lasted from the 7th century to the 18th, and was ruled by a council of businessmen and aristocrats. We could also look at Athenian ...


76

For many countries, the decision to attend or not is deferred to the national football association. The countries that you mention don't require exit visas, so it would require an exceptional act to prevent the football players from attending the World Cup in Russia. The government can attempt to influence the football association, but it is not a matter ...


66

Part of it is going to be that the region (HK, Singapore, SK?, China) was hit much harder during the 2003 SARS epidemic so spent more time getting prepared. Also, it has long been the expectation that the next epidemic would come out of China, both due to population density and proximity to livestock/wild animals, so those countries could expect another "...


44

I think these countries are in fact approaching this as a problem that has an obvious solution, as you suggest. The issue lies, however, with convincing their populace to work these seasonal jobs, and the inherent nature of seasonal agricultural work. Firstly, the levels of unemployment are not necessarily going to be as bad as you might think, at least in ...


38

There is no single conclusive "why" other than the boring and inane "because nobody enacted such laws... Because there is not enough political support compared to opposition for such a thing". However, it's worth looking into the plausible arguments against such a program, of which I can list several: Some people objectively can't work. They are ...


34

FIFA has very strong policies against government interference. If a government would pressure its football association to boycott the world cup, the result would be immediate suspension. So not only the decision itself would be unpopular, but it would result in further unpopular consequences (teams not allowed in other country and team international ...


30

It's difficult to do apples-to-apples comparisons between countries in these matters. Here's an excerpt from a recent CNN article (March 17) contrasting South Korea with Italy and delving into why the comparison (in terms of outcomes) is made difficult by confounding demographics factors: In South Korea, the rate of testing has been quite high (3,692 ...


22

There are significant efforts to recruit unemployed or underemployed locals for seasonal farm work. In many cases seasonal farm work is actually skilled work, at least if it is to be done quickly and correctly (i.e. pick only the ripe fruit, not all of it). While that can be learned, teaching requires formal or more likely informal instruction. It won't be ...


21

There's no better answer than Thern's, I'm afraid. Some governments have effectively boycotted the 2018 World Cup... by not sending governmental representatives to the official acts. But they haven't done anything to prevent the national teams to compete nevertheless - the only exception being the USA, who boycotted the World Cup by not qualifying. :p ...


21

There were many preexisting diverging views on international law. The open disagreements about e.g. the NATO intervention in Kosovo don't constitute the main problem, because in such a case the disagreement is made explicit, everyone knows what the differing views are, problems can then be prevented. The main issue are the many cases where Russia believes ...


18

First, let's get some insider information from the man on the ground: I live in Algeria, a North African country. I don't know about the Middle East, but there's no North African islamic government. Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt; none of these are Islamic. Some of these have dealt with problems, some are dealing with problems as I write these ...


17

The day after lockdown measures were implemented in the UK, YouGov conducted a poll of 2788 adults testing whether they supported or opposed the imposition of the measures. They found that 76% of respondents strongly supported the measures, 17% somewhat supported them, and only a combined 4% opposed them in any way. Just over two weeks later, on April 9th, ...


15

Western powers (or any powers in fact) do not just support a side in war because they like their ideology. War is business. As a person or a party, showing public support for one side in a war can increase your political power, or mean political suicide. And if you bring in military support, you start bleeding money very quickly. Assad has been vilified ...


15

Political thinking Current western political thinking tends to be in favour of free market economics and austerity as general principles. from this perspective the following issues arise with job guarantee it is only possible to create so many jobs before either interfering with the free market too much or creating pointless non-jobs Job guarantee schemes ...


15

I think your first premise is wrong; here are some counter-examples. The recent attack on a Mosque in New Zealand is being widely referred to as a Terror Attack. The murder of worshippers outside a Mosque in the UK was quickly associated with a 'Right wing terrorist' and now referred to as a Terror Attack. Anders Breivik was convicted of terrorism. When ...


15

Are there oligarchs in Western countries? No. Though it might depend which countries you consider "western" - it is a vague term. A definition of oligarchy is: a small group of people having control of a country or organization. However in relation to "Eastern European" countries, the term is usually applied to countries where the government of the ...


14

1. The countries who had most interest in a boycott failed the qualification. England (Skripal affair), Ukraine (East Ukraine split), USA (hostile because of Syrian/Ukraine situation) and the Netherlands (MH 17), they all failed the qualification and were therefore unable to boycott the WM. 2. Sport boycotts don't achieve anything except increasing ...


12

This is debatable, of course, depending what precise definition one attaches to "oligarch". If you consider a stricter one, RedGrittyBrick's answer is essentially correct. On the other hand, Berlusconi has been called "Italy's oligarch". Wikipedia's page on Berlusconi cites a Foreign Policy article titled "Now the Czechs Have an Oligarch Problem, Too" ...


11

Except to the extent that "national security interests", immigration policy, or the enforceability of tax laws are involved, a major theme of U.S. law is that the legal standing of a person should not depend on who that person is. This concept is related to the ideas of "equality under the law" and "rule of law". This theme of U.S. law encourages people to ...


11

You are partly right: A politician can make almost any claim, unless libel laws apply. There is no onus on the opposition to prove him wrong because a politician has no right to be believed by the public. The opposition would only try to prove him wrong if there are people left who believe the lying politician. Most lies will be judged in the "court of ...


11

To be honest, I doubt that your basic assumption is correct that Asian countries are handling the crisis much better than European countries. I will focus on Germany in this answer as I have first hand experience ;) If you are watching media coverage, it indeed seems like everything is out of control. One restriction is following another and as of today ...


11

Lower Salary requests: Seasonal workers at the end of the season might go back to their country where there's a lower cost of living (at least for now). Furthermore, if they have to support a family, or save to buy a home, it is probably still at the prices of the country of origin, and therefore they are probably willing to accept lower salaries. Lack of ...


9

Because by 1940, the Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies became imminent. These colonies were rich in oil, so such an invasion would ruin the energy stability of Europe and the U.S. The Japanese invasion of China started in 1937 and cost about 30 million lives; it was associated with use of chemical weapons, forced labor camps, medical experiments on ...


8

The "when" is simpler and better understood than the "why" part. First articles expressing complete surprice at the turnaround started comming out around 2006-2007. tl;dr (skip to the last paragraph for the summary) Putin's political party created a youth organization whose name NYTimes translated as "we". It was reported to be a party-sponsored ...


8

There are thee main reasons why we started having strong anti-Western sentiments in XXIth century: NATO intervention in such countries as Iraq, Libya and Syria. Please don't tell me about oppression of human rights in these countries, as in that case some Western-supported regimes in the Persian Gulf should be also overthrown. Western-supported overthrowal ...


8

The problem with narratives is that they mix facts with subjective interpretations, usually with a political motive. This question is ambiguous because it embraces a narrative (unequal treatment of Muslim vs non-Muslim terrorism), itself based on another narrative (Islam is a threat and leads to violence). Both these narratives offer a very distorted view ...


8

I'm going to offer several answers, since they can all conceivably answer your question, depending on the kind of answer you're looking for. First answer: Asian countries reacted more drastically than Western countries You can see this in the different responses they had to people entering their countries. From China to the UK: I live in China, where a ...


7

This subject is examined in the "How Polarized are Citizens? Measuring Ideology from the Ground-Up" paper from 2018. Of interest to this specific question is Figure 8: Polarization by Country on page 39, which indicates that Denmark and Iceland have the least amount of polarization of the countries listed. The paper goes into quite some detail on their ...


7

There is a spectrum of oligarchy which is defined by distribution of wealth and despotism/autocracy. Oligarchs completely control police, military, banks, newspapers, television and law courts. Western elites also control those things, only partially and secretly. They are LESS above the law than oligarchs. Oligarchs dictate the law, western elites lubricate ...


7

I would dispute all the premises of the question. Until now, there are no unprecedented levels of unemployment due to COVID19-related measures across the Western world. The only country where I have heard that the lockdowns resulted in immediate massive unemployment is the US. By contrast, many European countries had higher level of unemployment (as defined,...


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