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I voted in one prairie Canadian city for mayor and city council.
In the country I was born, every mayor and counsellor is announced and supported by a party, which is known publicly.
However, in this election I couldn't find anywhere such information: neither in their candidate profile, nor on internet.
So, in Canada, are the city candidates supported by parties and if so, is this known publicly or how can one find out?

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    In general (not sure about Canada specifically), it is not an uncommon practice to have candidates for administrative elections not to be officially backed by a party, especially for smaller cities. Notice that they might still be somehow linked to a party, though. – o0'. Feb 24 '13 at 16:56
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The answer is: it varies.

For example, Canada's largest city (Toronto) runs its municipal politics on a non-partisan basis, where neither the mayor nor the councillors are formally members of parties. Other major cities such as Ottawa and Calgary do the same. That isn't to say that party politics is absent from the process, and mayors often have associations with some party or other.

On the other hand Montreal mayors are typically members of political parties. The current mayor is an exception as he took office after the previous mayor resigned during a corruption investigation. (EDIT:The mayor I just mentioned has now also resigned as part of a corruption scandal. Oh Montreal.) These parties are specific to Montreal municipal politics. Vancouver also works this way (i.e. with political parties - not with multiple corruption scandals).

  • If you would like more details, I suggest asking another question. – DJClayworth Jul 27 '13 at 18:04
  • Do you mean vancouver has lots of scandals or vancouver has local political parties involved? – Dale Jul 27 '13 at 20:59

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