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I can find a lot of data about which countries currently have the most net trade with Britain, but I assume that Brexit will hit them unevenly. For instance, if a country (Germany?) mostly buys/sells heavy manufacturing to the UK, you'd expect a lag or a pre-emptive decline in trade ahead of the March deadline, whereas you'd expect a country that traded food with the UK (France?) to experience a more immediate effect.

Assuming that it will be countries that have large daily volumes of trade with Britain or trade mainly in consumable goods, or have large labor populations in/from Britain, which countries will be most immediately affected by Brexit assuming a no-deal outcome?

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    Well, Britain for a start. – Jontia Feb 15 at 6:17
  • sadly, I cannot upvote that comment – brexitquestion Feb 15 at 6:25
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    the U.K. is Ireland's biggest trading partner and the only country that shares a border with the U.K. so would be affected more than any other country in Europe. – Icarian Feb 15 at 6:59
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Ireland

Outside of the UK itself, it will be Ireland. Its trade will be affected the most. Not only does Ireland have just one land border, with that land border with the UK, a lot of its imports and exports physically crosses the UK. From Europe, trucks cross the channel, drive through UK and then take a ferry to Ireland.

After Brexit, the UK will lie between Ireland and the rest of the EU.

  • Not only that but a no-deal Brexit will put the Irish government in a difficult position of having to uphold a EU border (with the UK) while preventing a return to the days before the Good Friday Agreement. This is a reason why the DUP calls a new Irish border a EU bluf. But speaking of the DUP and the Agreement; they have nearly managed to scuttle it anyways: foreignpolicy.com/2018/10/15/… – Fizz Feb 19 at 20:02
  • The DUP seems to want a hard border anyway which is probably why a hard Brexit suits them best. And they couch that in some unusual terms: belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/… – Fizz Feb 19 at 20:06

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