-5

In the UK there are two explicitly nationalist political parties, Plaid Cymru and the SNP, that curiously advocate handing sovereignty to the EU.

Are there nationalist parties anywhere else in the world that advocate for something similar?

  • 4
    These are probably better described as sub-nationalist parties. And they don't advocate handing sovereignty to the EU, they advocate maintaining the status-quo of being in the EU. – Jontia Jun 26 '19 at 10:42
  • @jontia they seek independence for countries that are not members of the EU and even if that was the case being a member of the EU means ceding sovereignty over significant areas of governance. – user1450877 Jun 26 '19 at 10:57
  • 3
    My point was that those areas of governance are already controlled by the EU, so they are not advocating "handing" over anything they currently control. By any measure, an independent Scotland or Wales within the EU would have more control over their own territory then they do now. – Jontia Jun 26 '19 at 11:08
  • 3
    The question is flawed. Plaid and the SNP do not consider joining the EU to be ceding sovereignty, they believe that it enhances it. As part of a larger group, with power such a veto, they have more control over their own destiny than they do alone. – user Jun 26 '19 at 11:09
  • 3
    @user1450877 Which definition? Seems more like they are pooling it. – user Jun 26 '19 at 11:24
6

The premise of this question is flawed as one user put it;

Plaid and the SNP do not consider joining the EU to be ceding sovereignty, they believe that it enhances it. As part of a larger group, with power such a veto, they have more control over their own destiny than they do alone.

Even accepting the broad sweep of the Questioners' position then yes, there are a number of similar examples available.

The most obvious direct comparison is Catalonia, the El Periodico poll table includes one poll that specifically asked for support for independence if it meant exclusion from the EU, it showed support dropping by 10%.

Other similar groups exist in Kosovo, a number of the sub-parties within the ruling Alliance for the Future party are described as nationalist, and Kosovo wants to be an EU member.

Looking further afield, the logic in the question would apply to the Six Californias proposal in the US. In this case the "nationalist" groups no longer want to be controlled by the state of California, but would be handing sovereignty to the US.

| improve this answer | |
2

The question is flawed. Plaid and the SNP do not consider joining the EU to be ceding sovereignty, they believe that it enhances it. As part of a larger group, with power such a veto, they have more control over their own destiny than they do alone.

| improve this answer | |
  • How is the supremacy of EU law and the EU courts over National law and courts not ceding sovereignty. It's fiction to think otherwise. – user1450877 Jun 26 '19 at 14:19
  • 3
    Well A) is it really ceded if the decision to leave can be taken unilaterally, and B) it's felt that on balance the overall effect is a net gain. – user Jun 26 '19 at 14:23
  • 1
    @user1450877 No EU law comes into effect without approval of Parliament, Commission and Council, the latter being composed of representatives of all currently 28 sovereign national governments. Consensus is an important principle in the council and thus compromises are typically found that most states agree on. In addition, each country appoints a commissioner and elects members of the EU parliament so I thoroughly fail to follow your fiction argument. – Jan Oct 29 '19 at 8:45

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .