62

Nationalism today is mostly associated with ethnic nationalism, which the SNP as a center-left party does not wish to be associated with. Nicola Sturgeon, the leader of the SNP, has expressed displeasure with the name because of this: Nicola Sturgeon has admitted she wishes she could change her party’s name because of the “hugely, hugely problematic” ...


46

In the UK, two fingers is an insult much like the middle finger in the USA. Done in a palm-out orientation it is the victory sign, as done by Winston Churchill. The other way around, palm inwards (knuckles out) it is just like the middle finger.


24

In the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the two fingers (sometimes also two-fingered salute) is a sign whose meaning can approximately equated to the middle finger which is used in North America, Europe and probably other places. Both are a hand gesture with the palm facing inwards and fingers streched out: index and middle finger in the case of two fingers. ...


24

In the UK system, the speaker is politically neutral, and this requirement of neutrality has been taken seriously by generations of speakers. Moreover it is quite common for the speaker not to be from the majority party. The speaker is not a governmental position, and it is quite common for the speaker to come from a minority party. The current Westminster ...


18

The SNP's long term goal is independence for Scotland. During the last referendum on the subject, the issue of which currency Scotland would use was an important point of contention. The legal situation is somewhat unclear and, possibly as a tactic to convince voters to remain in the UK, the UK national government suggested that they would not want to share ...


10

YouGov covered this territory at start of 2020. There isn't as much of an obvious Indy+Remain/UK+Leave split as you might imagine, but it is substantial. Do note that this poll covered votes in the previous referenda, and despite the column heading the Scottish Independence referendum was first. There is no reason why an individual might not believe an ...


10

I'd like to start by making a distinction between the Scottish government and Scottish public. As you said, only one MSP voted in favour of Trident. But the Scottish public are more balanced, with slightly more in favour than not. The Scottish government are presently dominated by the SNP, who have been anti-nuclear since their inception. Initially they ...


7

they would be obliged to join the Euro as soon as the necessary economic conditions were met? The second part of this sentence is doing a lot of work. The criteria are quite onerous and many of the current Eurozone members no longer meet them; they are also fairly easy to game if a country does not want to join the Euro. The reason so much effort is being ...


5

It is one method of defusing the ability of the opposition of calling them ethnonationalists - and being able to present the SNP as an alternative in Scotland to the Tory (and Labour too) party without being branded antisemitic for example. I believe that Scotland, due to the oil industry, has a number of ex-foreigners who after, say, 30 years see ...


5

🖔 U+1F594 although todays meaning is more or less "fuck off you twat." But it mostly lost that appeal: If asked, most people would gloss the meaning as ‘Fuck you’ or something similar, and it was certainly a very potent offensive gesture until recent years when it seems to be losing its ability to offend. –– Jacqueline Simpson & Steve Roud: "A ...


4

This is an example the SNP's Scottish spelling: It simply mean the same as deputy: a person appointed or elected as assistant to a public official, serving as successor in the event of a vacancy. As Wikipedia says: A deputy leader (in Scottish English, sometimes depute leader) in the Westminster system is the second-in-command of a political ...


3

There is no way for the Scottish Parliament to call a legally binding referendum Referendums are not legally binding. Under any circumstance, the UK parliament would have to approve the breakup of the Union. The UK has a tradition of "government by consent" (as least a relates to home nations) In the event of a clearly and consistently expressed will of the ...


3

The SNP sailed into power on a flagship policy of total independence for Scotland. The weight of this overarching proclamation was easily invoked against a particularly strong national identity such as Scots - and to a considerably enlarged sector of populace regardless of other policies. The Scottish people nearly sleepwalked/stumbled into total ...


3

Polling companies have been heavily criticised recently for their methodology, and the site you mention has provided further information, though not explicitly. The graph from whatscotlandthinks.org , from which your observations flow, provides background information in the linked 'Notes and methodology'. The question posed by the pollsters, actually or ...


3

Two reasons: (1) That is not its name, and (2) it doesn't like to be reminded of its history. Its correct (English) name is the Scottish National Party, not "Nationalist." It was founded by the merger of the center-left National Party of Scotland and the center-right Scottish Party. Until the 1960s the SNP did not have a clear ideology, beyond the vague ...


2

The SNP's seat total fell to 64 seats on 23 September 2014. However, due to seat vacanies, it still had a majority of voting members at the end of the Parliament. The events that led to the reduction of SNP MSPs are as follows: 11 May 2011: Tricia Marwick (Mid Fife & Glenrothes) elected as Presiding Officer, meaning she cannot take any party whip 4 ...


2

The SNP leadership hadn't intended the currency question to be "a big thing" at the conference. The original intent was just to ratify their Growth Commission report. However, the policy was changed, through an amendment proposed by some of the membership, to move to a new currency as soon as possible. This raises two questions: Why would the membership ...


1

The SNP do not believe that Scotland would have to join the Euro. The other answers are correct. However, I thought I'd add an interview which Nicola Sturgeon, leader of the SNP, gave within the last week which clearly answers this part of the question. How are they resolving this obvious conflict, if at all? https://youtu.be/gNFKII1C8gI?t=150 This is a ...


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