145

In 1800, more than 90% of everyone were farmers. Modernly in the United States, which is a net exporter of food, less than 5% of everyone are employed on farms. That's a reduction of 85%, much higher than 45%. Far from causing the end of capitalism, it launched the industrial age. In short, the capitalist answer is that there is always something else ...


109

The EU does pursue technological independence. For example, it has assembled its own satellite navigation system so that it does not have to rely on GPS and Glonass. The EU develops a lot of military hardware (ships, jets, missiles, you name it). The EU also has its own space programme and the ability to put objects in orbit independently. On the computing ...


76

I think the misunderstanding comes from how conservatives complain about bias in media and tech. Conservatives often don't call for government action, they just want to shed light on the injustices. For example: “Some of us tell the truth about our government, they call us treasonous and say we’re speaking out of line and they’d like to punish us, and I ...


74

People often have the mistaken belief that computers are inherently objective and unbiased – and while they may not hold prejudices themselves, the results that they produce reflect the biases and assumptions of their programmers. This is particularly clear with machine learning systems, where the predictions they give out are dependent on data set used to ...


64

(Caveat: The Republican Party is nowhere near the monolith it works so hard to appear as.) As the Republican party has fallen more and more in-line with Trumpism (which, really, predates Trump and goes back at least as far as Nixon, but definitely surged in visibility with the ascendancy of Trump) vengeance has become more and more of a political value to ...


63

Republicans cannot just "use other platforms" because of the network effect. Everyone is already on Facebook, Twitter, et. al. So say die-hard Republicans all go to Parler. Now they're in a bubble. Who are they convincing in the long-term debate that is public discourse? Everyone on Parler already agrees with them. The whole point behind the ...


50

It's not just US institutions, there are many countries, institutions - including banks - and companies running on ancient software and hardware. There are multiple reasons for that: First, from the business standpoint, replacing software costs money. Why spend money to replace something that already meets requirements? If you have software A that does ...


49

I wonder how we should react to a non-sentient robot claiming to hold a particular set of beliefs and principles. You should bear in mind that it is actually expressing the views of the controllers of the company that manufacturers it (or at least, the views they wish to publicly espouse), and act accordingly - i.e. with a heavy dose of healthy scepticism. ...


44

The answer from a capitalist's point of view is fairly straight forward. As demand for certain types of labor fall, demand for other types of labor will increase and workers will need to gain skills in other areas in order to maintain employment or for their own businesses to succeed. A comment to your question alludes to this. There used to be a huge ...


43

It’s not only EU, there is no such thing as a technological independent state anymore. North Korea is the closest one to be. There are enterprises in US and Asia which manufacture nanotechnology, but they depend on world spanning supply chains. They need equipment from e.g. the Netherlands (ASML). ASML is dependent on components from Germany. So no counties ...


39

Let me set aside, for the moment, the question of whether current facial recognition technology (FRT) accurately distinguishes the facial features of non-whites. There is some evidence that it does not, but that is a technological problem which could (assumedly) be ironed out. The more pressing problem is that technology does not think at all in the sense ...


34

It probably depends on what circle of 'conservatives' you're talking to, but the most legitimate complaint I see get thrown around, is that big tech companies should be forced to abide by one of the two legal frameworks that they currently only take the best parts from. Either they are a platform, in which case they shouldn't be censoring anything not ...


29

The Republican Party Historically the Republican party has been a big tent which deliberately sets out to include a wide range of opinions on the political right. As a result there are, roughly speaking, two main wings in the Republican Party: Libertarians, who oppose big government , support tax cuts and gay rights, want to see an end to the drug war, cut ...


28

Blockchain-based cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin aren't actually that untraceable, because the transfer history of every wallet is public. When cryptocurrencies ever become economically relevant, you can expect law enforcement to put all those currently hyped big data analysis and machine learning technologies to use and data-mine the blockchains for ...


25

Because it's hard to do, prone to failure and very costly. And because the newer alternatives aren't always a big improvement. Very costly in the sense that failure costs in the multiple 100M$ are frequent and could easily become an election issue (which makes it a political issue). Take a look, for example, at Canada's revamped payroll system. $1B+ and ...


25

Every new technology used for policing is thought to lead to racist results, because it is assumed that policing as currently practiced leads to racist results. Here's a blog post from 4 years ago that discusses a number of technologies that law enforcement was considering using in Northern California: https://www.aclunc.org/blog/together-we-can-put-stop-...


25

Allow me to preface this by noting that breaking up or regulating large social media companies might in fact be a good idea. It's patently unwise to leave major social and political issues to be resolved by a handful of individuals who own or work for private organizations. I'm not suggesting that Republicans are taking such a high-minded philosophical view, ...


21

It doesn't have one. Full automation in a capitalist society will naturally evolve towards a dystopia without intervention from outside the economy. When a machine is smart enough, and can do the job of a human at lower resource consumption than the human, there is simply no reason to employ a human. So far, machines have not been smart enough, and people ...


21

Technological independence is a strategic military goal, not an economic one. One of the basic principles of economics is comparative advantage, which says that trade will benefit both parties if there is a difference between the relative costs of producing different items (so if bread and biscuits cost X and 2X respectively in country A, and Y and 3Y in ...


20

So I'm on the libertarian side with some leftist and some rightist reservations, so I am not a conservative, but I think there are a few points to be made. I think I should note that I don't buy the second point completely, but I have heard the argument be made, so I might not be the best at arguing it. First, expressing dislike about how the market ends up ...


19

A full answer would probably take several books. But in part it's a combination of economics and politics. On the economics side, manufacturing is too expensive in Europe (just like in US), due in large part to high labour costs, but also other costs. Which is why your phones and computer parts are mostly physically made in Asia. On the political - and as ...


17

Why some countries are poor and others are rich is one of the fundamental questions in economics, going all the way back to Adam Smith. There is a whole wealth of literature on the subject, but to simplify greatly the three main sources of economic growth are resources, technology, and institutions. Mexico has a reasonably large quantity of of natural ...


16

I'm not sure if Tim Burton is a Capitalist or not, but he gave a really good illustration of what tends to happen over time in his version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Charlie's father works capping toothpaste tubes The factory buys a machine to cap the tubes. Charlie's father is fired At the end of the movie, Charlie's father is the man who repairs ...


15

The Republicans are reacting logically to their de facto leader being banned from Facebook and Twitter. If a top Democratic leader managed to get themselves banned from Facebook and Twitter, then you can bet there'd be a ton of pressure to put FB back in its place. Start with the idea that FB is often seen, on all sides of the political spectrum, with less ...


14

Capitalism doesn't have an answer, and doesn't need an answer. What people always forget when they worry about automation is that prices for things get less. At the turn of the century, people would pay 43% of their income on food, just to stay alive! That has gone down to about 5% now due to automation! (I can't find a source chart for before 1920's.) ...


12

I would like to address the underlying misconception that was expressed in the note: I am not thinking about big leaps, but at least to work with languages and frameworks that are at most 20 years old, not 60 years old. Yes, COBOL is a pretty old language and new systems are likely not made with it anymore. However, FORTRAN is even older (63 years) and ...


12

In addition to the other answers, there's also the issue of using facial recognition to predict criminality of an individual. For example: this The Intercept article. For clarity, the research paper was specifically published to highlight these fears, not as a serious attempt to predict criminality, but still serves to highlight the origin of fears around ...


12

In the best scenario, a government won't regulate an industry until there is a clear and distinct problem that requires regulation. First, a demonstrable public ill related to the activities of the industry must come into evidence. Second, the industry itself must show an inability or unwillingness to address that public ill. Then (and only then) will ...


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