111

Basically Bernie Sanders used the wrong term and it stuck. For some unfathomable reason, he refers to himself as a socialist while espousing policies that are clearly social Democrat in line with most European states. He has done himself no favors. If he had said social democrat, he wouldn't have received as much McCarthy-ist style attacks. He is definitely ...


81

In short, because Democratic Party in USA is roughly split between two factions (I'll label them "progressive" and "establishment" just for the sake of labeling). FiveThirtyEight covered this split in great detail in the last couple of months (as well as a split in Republican party); but for the purposes of this question, Sanders represented the "...


66

The idea that the DNC "rigged" the primaries is false. I voted Bernie in the primary, too, but it is very important not to take the claim in the WikiLeaks graphic at face value. This July 2016 New Republic article debunks the claim: No, the DNC Didn’t Rig the Primary in Favor of Hillary: Wikileaks’s tweets conjured dark and menacing conspiracies, ...


65

Unfortunately, the answer is probably yes and no. Every state & territory has different rules & procedures governing who can appear on a ballot and how they qualify to be there. Some, if not most, states have "sore loser" laws that prevent a candidate who lost in a primary election from appearing on the ballot as an independent (or presumably the ...


63

Why is it that Bernie Sanders always called a "socialist"? I think getting a quick history lesson to get some context might help explain how "socialist" is used in US media. First, I want to highlight the long history of anti-(anti-capitalism); second, show how anything anti-capitalism is generally conflated; and third, how this is the case in the ...


56

It seems likely that people call him a socialist because he's self-identified as one on multiple occasions. and When he first won election to the House in 1990, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) embraced his political identity. "I am a socialist and everyone knows that," Sanders said, responding to an ad that tried to link him to the regime of Fidel ...


42

The simple answer is there was more competition. In 2016, it was mostly Sanders vs Clinton for the Democratic Primary. She had several potential scandals brewing (her private email server, questions about the Clinton Global Initiative, etc) and Sanders was the only outlet for people who did not want to see Clinton win. Sanders had plenty of healthy ...


34

Bernie Sanders tweeted the graphic below in April of 2019, it was accompanied by the following text (emphasis mine): Every other major country has made health care a right for all. Anyone who says the United States cannot do the same is selling the American people short. #MedicareForAll While not a definition, the examples speak for themselves. Indeed, ...


32

The number of Declared Republican Candidates in 2016 was 17 according to Ballotpedia. Donald Trump and Jeb Bush Ben Carson Chris Christie Ted Cruz Carly Fiorina Jim Gilmore Lindsey Graham Mike Huckabee Bobby Jindal John Kasich George Pataki Rand Paul Rick Perry Marco Rubio Rick Santorum Scott Walker Also listed are another ...


31

The joke is referencing Sanders fundraising strategy. His campaign targeted small donors, and managed to raise an unprecedented amount from online contributions. 27$ is a reference to the average online donation in January, a month when the money raised (~20mil) came almost exclusively from these online contributions.


30

The controversy is mainly focused on the validity of his statement when it comes to whites and blacks in poverty, not necessarily racism. There are actually far more poor whites in the U.S. than poor blacks. These are the statistics on Americans living in poverty from 2014, the most recent data from the Census Bureau: Whites (Non-Hispanic): 19.7 million ...


28

You can expect truth in campaign speeches, but not scientific definitions. For an approximation of major countries, try the G7. Of course the G7 misses China, India, Russia, Brazil, which are quite important in the 21st century world. Canada: Yes. France: Yes. Germany: Yes. Italy: Yes. Japan: Yes. UK: Yes. Those "yes" are never absolute. Some procedures ...


28

It likely has something to do with who he was running against in 2016. It's hard to make a "head-to-head" comparison when the opposition was different.


25

It should also be mentioned that Bernie Sanders is not a Democrat. He ran for the Senate as an independent. While he caucused with the Democrats, he never claimed to be one before running for president. For that matter, while running he barely claimed to be a Democrat. He joined party leadership, but now he's back to declaring himself an independent. ...


25

This is absurd. It will never happen. That said, Bernie Sanders would have to do one of Get appointed Vice President. This requires the VP slot to be vacated (by death, impeachment, resignation, etc.) and for someone to pick Bernie for it. Then the President has to leave. Get appointed to the cabinet. Then everyone ahead of him has to vacate. Get ...


24

First let's consider the question "What's so revolutionary about Bernie Sanders"? Sanders has political positions which are unusually social-democratic for American politics. When you compare the United States with European countries, the US policies were always favoring a smaller state and a more capitalist system with fewer transfer payments and fewer ...


23

At the heart of it, it is an inaccurate statement that presupposes all white people are wealthy. This ignores the multitude of white individuals that are poor. According to The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, there are more white people beneath the poverty line than black people beneath the poverty line. 19,796,700 > 10,145,200 In its full context: &...


19

That story is from 2 days ago before it passed and is no longer a relevant point. The issue was that 4 republican senators stalled the bill to try to weaken unemployment benefits. Sanders made a counter-threat to stall the bill if they didn't withdraw their objections, to prevent the Senate from giving in to their objections. Sanders objected to an ...


17

How many Americans are uninsured? According to the Bureau of the Census, in 2016 there were 27.3 million uninsured people in America. This was based on the American Community Survey, which is conducted regularly by the Bureau. Table S2702 of the 2017 data release (the most recent that appears to be available) says that about 28 million people were ...


17

Folks who support the view that Sanders is actually socialist sometimes point to this quote from him way back in 1987: Democracy means public ownership of the major means of production, it means decentralization, it means involving people in their work. Rather than having bosses and workers it means having democratic control over the factories and ...


17

In addition to the "sore loser" laws mentioned in the other answer, candidate filing deadlines rarely allow a candidate to do this. For example, the deadline for filing to run as an independent in Texas was Dec 9, months before the primary elections started. If Sanders tried to switch now, he wouldn't be able to put his name on the ballot. Some other ...


16

There are more candidates at this point in the race, so votes are going to be more split. Expecting % differences to remain constant doesn't make much sense when at least 4 candidates got non-negligible support in most places. In Minnesota, an endorsement of one of Sanders' opponents by a popular senator and former presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar, as ...


14

The basic mechanism of a political party is to reward loyalty and create a unified front. Clinton had some 40+ years of favors to call in from various democrats, and anybody in the party who threw in for her could expect some obligation if/when she finally won. Meanwhile Bernie was an independent his whole political career and not a member of the ...


14

(This answer assumes right-wing as in: individualist / small-government / pro-business, not right-wing as in authoritarian or royalist) This has to do with the history of the USA. A complete answer would take an entire book, so this answer is not complete, but two important contributing factors for Americans with a protestant white European migration ...


12

Note: The earlier version of the question when I answered specifically accused the DNC of being "rigged." I'm not really interested in playing chase-the-goalpost (the OP has an agenda). The current revision also still tries to indirectly suggest the process was somehow rigged, so it's mostly still relevant anyhow. The idea that the DNC somehow ...


12

According to the FEC the Sander 2016 campaign raised 237.7 million and disbursed 233.0 million, leaving 4.7 million cash on hand as of Dec 2018. I can't imagine that he gave it to the DNC, as Sanders is not a Democrat. According to Investopedia funds remaining at the conclusion of a campaign are: Permissible Uses The contributions can be used in ...


11

I think there's an important distinction to be made in the examples you noted. The left-of-center news outlets actually make an effort to call him by his chosen name of "Democratic Socialist." The Hill (left-center) The Nation (left) It's the right-wing sources that conflate the terminology. Daily Mail (right, questionable source) Newsmax (right) Fox ...


10

During the CNN debate, on the 8th Feb 2017, Ben Shapiro tweeted "Bernie Sanders WANTS HIS PUDDING AND HE WANTS IT NOW". The "joke" being that Bernie Saunders (aged 75) is old, and so likes soft, slightly sweet food. It's not a subtle joke (and explaining any joke makes it even less funny), pudding doesn't represent anything else. Ben Shapiro is a journalist ...


10

Probably First, even if he wasn't campaigning in Rome, he was campaigning where he was before and after the trip. So he could argue that the travel was campaign related from that alone. Second, he may well have received a campaign benefit from going to the Vatican. It certainly got him a lot of "free" media before, during, and after the trip. Third, ...


10

Currently, the United States spends $3.2 T/yr on healthcare, of which $2 T/yr is spent by the government and $1.2 T/yr is spent by individuals and businesses. Under Medicare for All, all of that spending would be moved to the Federal Government. The proposal, however, suggests that reduced administration costs and negotiated discounts on pharmaceuticals ...


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