74

Outside a small fringe group, there is a broad consensus in Germany that starting WW2 was wrong. That is not incompatible with the idolization of German soldiers who fought in the war, though. For a long time (I would say roughly after the war until the 80s), many Germans blamed the political leadership (i.e. Hitler and the other Nazi leaders) essentially ...


52

Yes, in September 2009, at an occasion to mark the 70th anniversary of the outbreak of WWII, then-President Lech Kaczyński gave the following speech: Two generations have passed but the Second World War still requires reflection; Poland’s participation in the reduction of territory of Czechoslovakia was not only a mistake – it was a sin, and Poland ...


46

Yes Pacta sunt servanda, agreements must be kept. The Treaty of San Francisco is 70 years old which is young compared to many older treaties. Agreements have a few "outs," neither of which are valid in Japan's case: Duress: Agreements signed under duress can sometimes be nullified. Japan could perhaps be said to be under duress from the United States. As ...


39

The holocaust took place to some extent within Germany, and German Jews/gypsies/homosexuals were taken to extermination camps. There was no equivalent within Japan itself. Japanese war crimes took place in China and Korea, a long distance geographically and cognitively from people in Japan. The holocaust was separate from war. The Nazis wanted to exterminate ...


31

Is Japan still bound by the terms of its surrender in WWII? Yes, but... Can the Japanese legally build an offensive military force to counter those threats? In other words, are they pacifists by choice, or are they still bound by their terms of surrender and the treaties they signed? Japan recently announced it was working on revising its constitution, ...


26

You are completely misjudging the intention of these memorials. In one of the articles you linked, a politician talks about the placement of one of these memorials: Es mache Sinn, dass Passanten das Denkmal sehen könnten. "Es soll ja ein Mahnmal sein, damit die Leute sich Gedanken machen." Translates to (see PS notes about "Mahnmal".) It makes sense ...


22

Neither. Germany surrendered at the beginning of May 1945. The Trinity test was conducted in July 1945. The US dropped Little Boy without testing its design (it was simpler and there was much less doubt about whether it'd work), but it was completed in July as well. By the time the US had nuclear weapons, Germany had surrendered, and it's considered in poor ...


19

Somewhere around a 70/30 split, I would say. The exact numbers depend on just what sentiments are classed as not feeling sorry. I think a majority is truly sorry. There is a minority who is only sorry that Germany lost WWII, not that they started it. Others admit that starting WWII was wrong, but either blame the Versailles treaty or the Nazis in ...


18

In short, yes the information presented in that graphic is well sourced and appears generally reliable. The creator of the graphic is Olivier Berruyer who is French political blogger. His source is IFOP, a well established French polling company, with a history dating back to 1938. Olivier includes in his blog an image of a 1944 newspaper containing the ...


14

An important factor is the posture of German versus Japanese leaders. For instance, when he was sentenced to hang at Nuremburg, Hans Frank, a leading Nazi opined: "A thousand years will pass and still Germany's guilt will not have been erased." On the other hand, in his radioed "surrender announcement" to the Japanese people," the Emperor Hirohito said, "...


12

Here's my best shot at answering your question: Since the bombing was a military act carried out during wartime, it's highly unlikely that any legal action could have been taken. Nuclear bombs were a brand new weapon, and thus there were no existing rules regarding their use. But legal hypotheticals aside, the reality is that public opinion was firmly ...


12

Basically, as the article you mentioned explains further, it's part of the Putin-era effort to [re]glorify the Stalinist legacy, and in particular the WWII aspects thereof. Also, the trend appears to have been exacerbated by the post-2014 events (standoff with the West over the Crimean annexation etc.) The re-evaluation of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact ...


11

As the other answers already say - yes the majority of germans are truly sorry about what Germany caused by starting WW2 - Of course there are some people still claiming the war was inevitable due to Versailles treaty - and that Germany was given full guilt for WW1 even though Austria was the one that initiated/ orchestrated it. The view on these events - ...


11

Czechoslovakia was occupied by both Nazi Germany and Poland. Wrong. Actually this little area has been occupied by Czechoslovakia since 1920 as they needed a railroad placed there. During the 1920-21 Polish-Soviet war, Czechoslovakia even actively collaborated with Soviet Union in order to make Poland weaker and catch an opportunity to conquer this land ...


10

Surprisingly International Law is much less clear than one would think, but this doesn't seems to be the case. For one Russia did not exist at that time and so it cannot be at war with anybody since World War II. This also explains why, however you look at it, the Korean War is the longest active war. But the main reason is that while Soviet Union and Japan ...


10

There is indeed a disconnect between these monuments honoring German soldiers and Steinmeier's apology to the victims of German tyranny, and that disconnect is very much a representation of how Germans have dealt and continue to deal with the German past. To state the obvious: The Wehrmacht was intrinsic to the Holocaust and committed systematic war crimes. ...


9

Because by 1940, the Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies became imminent. These colonies were rich in oil, so such an invasion would ruin the energy stability of Europe and the U.S. The Japanese invasion of China started in 1937 and cost about 30 million lives; it was associated with use of chemical weapons, forced labor camps, medical experiments on ...


9

Unlike Germany, Japan didn't undergo a similar procedure of de-nazification after the defeat. Due to urgency to fight off communism, US allowed many of previous fascist elements continue to play vital role in post war re-construction and Japanese politics. Naturally, these former fascist elements have grown a stronghold in modern right wing Japanese politics....


8

This answer has 3 parts, the first two answering the question in the title, the 3rd tackling the issue of glorification/(in)compatibility of memorials. Steinmeier as president represents the Federal Republic of Germany. From a legal point of view, Germany is an international legal person (Völkerrechtssubjekt) and this international legal person is still the ...


8

This is a point of significant contention. It would be inaccurate to claim that there exists consensus among scholars, Jews, or even, occasionally, within individual sources. To provide an idea of the controversy, the English Wikipedia has the following definition: The Holocaust, also known as the Shoah, was the World War II genocide of the European Jews. ...


7

Schools In Germany, what should be taught is regulated in what is called Lehrplänen or Bildungspläne. These are different for each state and type of school, and they change over time. Additionally, teachers have some autonomy on what they will teach, so even when a topic is not mentioned, it could still be taught. Most plans focus on teaching methodology ...


7

can the Japanese legally build an offensive military force to counter those threats? No. But it's trivially easy to build a large defensive force to protect yourself, your friends and your interests, even if it far away from your home territory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_9_of_the_Japanese_Constitution#Reinterpretation_in_2014 In July 2014, ...


7

Jimmy Carter has visited Hiroshima. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_visitors_to_the_Hiroshima_Peace_Memorial_Museum This Forbes article mentions Carter but no-one else, suggesting he's the only one.


7

Correct. The state of war between Japan and Allied Powers was terminated at the signing of San Francisco Treaty of 1951. USSR refused to sign the treaty, due to dispute over Kuril Islands (which were promised to USSR during Yalta Conference, but not Potsdam, and the treaty was based on Potsdam for reasons discussed on Wikipedia) The U.S. maintains that ...


7

Speaking as an American whose only connection to Germany is that I had a great-grandfather who was German ... One can respect the courage of a soldier and honor his sacrifice without approving of his nation's goals in the war. I recall about 30 years ago a movie came out called "Das Boot" that was about a German U-Boat crew during World War 2. As an ...


6

I would have preferred to post this as a comment, but alas, I don't have enough reputation. There are a few other things to consider: Germany is a member of the European Union, and before that other political treaties with western Europe. They were therefore held under much more scrutiny by their former enemies. The US were concerned about a communist ...


6

Short answer is "China" It's therefore an internal matter for China to sort out. It just happens that there are two governments that have opposing claims to be the "Government of China", and neither one looks likely to cede the Chinese territory that it holds to the other any time soon. A matter in international law is "determined" if all relevant parties ...


5

To add to @bytebuster's excellent answer, Japan was threatening (with addition of Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere) to turn into a geopolitical powerhouse, spanning a large geographic area and commanding lots of natural resources AND human ones. It's never in the interest of established geopolitical powers (in this case, Western allies) to allow such ...


5

Trump is just saying that the Kurds are rather irrelevant to US interests, in his view. Or perhaps that they are only relatively recent allies, so the US shouldn't feel too attached to them. He is not literally complaining that the Kurds could have but didn't help in Normandy. Later in the same press conference Trump draws an analogy between Turkey vs ...


5

The proper noun "Holocaust" in that day's title seems to confine the answer within the boundaries of that instance of genocide. But other genocide remembrance days, which vary both in scope and adoption, include: Genocide Memorial Day International Day of Commemoration and Dignity of the Victims of the Crime of Genocide and of the Prevention of this ...


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